Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Not sure when it happened but someone side swiped my rear fender on passenger side.

Its pretty scratched up and there are chunks of paint missing and flaking off. The door looks fine but the portion where the fender and the door meets definitely do not line up anymore. I'm thinking about sanding the damage down and respraying it myself. Does anyone know where I can get a spray bottle of white diamond pearl for a decent price? Also whats a good clear coat brand to use?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
355 Posts
Does anyone know where I can get a spray bottle of white diamond pearl for a decent price? Also whats a good clear coat brand to use?
With all respect, your question suggests that you should practice on an easier job before tackling a respray on a nice car. If you want the repair to look like white diamond pearl, I recommend paying someone to paint it for you. If the car is already a beater, just knock the flakes off, spray the bare metal with some gray etching primer and use any white that's fairly close.

Matching a pearl finish takes quality materials and some skill. Primer, paint and clear will be well over $100 for enough to do a panel. Using a spray can makes the job even harder. By the time you buy the supplies, consumables and a respirator, it will probably cost more than a pro would charge.

Parts-store touchup paint will be cheap, but it won't look the same and it won't wear well.

If you're just going for "pretty good", go to an auto paint store and get a single-stage paint. Sherwin will package it in spray cans, even. It won't have the depth, but if you do a good job spraying and buff it out well, you'll get a decent gloss and color match that will be hard to see from 5 or 6 feet away. Just make sure you use the respirator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,555 Posts
With all respect, your question suggests that you should practice on an easier job before tackling a respray on a nice car. If you want the repair to look like white diamond pearl, I recommend paying someone to paint it for you. If the car is already a beater, just knock the flakes off, spray the bare metal with some gray etching primer and use any white that's fairly close.

Matching a pearl finish takes quality materials and some skill. Primer, paint and clear will be well over $100 for enough to do a panel. Using a spray can makes the job even harder. By the time you buy the supplies, consumables and a respirator, it will probably cost more than a pro would charge.

Parts-store touchup paint will be cheap, but it won't look the same and it won't wear well.

If you're just going for "pretty good", go to an auto paint store and get a single-stage paint. Sherwin will package it in spray cans, even. It won't have the depth, but if you do a good job spraying and buff it out well, you'll get a decent gloss and color match that will be hard to see from 5 or 6 feet away. Just make sure you use the respirator.
I have to agree with this one ..unless you already have the spray gear on hand it's better off having it done pro.

for small rock chips you can get the paint from the dealership for a few bucks .. its touch up paint only ..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Check with your Honda’s used car manager. I bet they have a guy who does all their touch up. They can work pretty good miracles for relatively little money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,914 Posts
I'll add some endorsement to Tacoma03's recommendation.

Getting any "interesting" color matched is a chore. Getting it matched in a spray can is a bigger chore. Using that spray can to paint a repaired panel is virtually impossible. Virtually any non-solid color is going to need some serious blending into adjacent panels to look right. Getting the prep correct, the color on correctly, and the clear on correctly over that is no place to practice your beginning Picasso skills, even with the correct color and the right equipment.

Recommendation: Visit your favorite local body repair place, and make a deal for the repair and paint work on a cash basis. You'll be a lot happier with the results.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
I'll add some endorsement to Tacoma03's recommendation.

Getting any "interesting" color matched is a chore. Getting it matched in a spray can is a bigger chore. Using that spray can to paint a repaired panel is virtually impossible. Virtually any non-solid color is going to need some serious blending into adjacent panels to look right. Getting the prep correct, the color on correctly, and the clear on correctly over that is no place to practice your beginning Picasso skills, even with the correct color and the right equipment.

Recommendation: Visit your favorite local body repair place, and make a deal for the repair and paint work on a cash basis. You'll be a lot happier with the results.
I 100% concur but if you want to try go ahead. The body shop won't charge you extra for repair, from if you didn't touch it, if you screw it up.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top