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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just bought a used 'as is' Pilot from a dealership, and I am looking for the original owner's manual so I can check service records. Did not see it in the glove box or center console. Does the Pilot have a tucked away stash spot for the owner's manual like some vehicles do? Thanks!
 

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If the original owner didn't keep the books, it would normally be found in the glove box. Any service performed by the dealership will be in their records in the service dept.
 

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Congrats on the purchase and welcome to the forum.

I’m guessing you have also checked the storage areas in the center console, behind the third row, and where the jack is stored. It’s doubtful it will be there, but worth looking.
 
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I would postulate that "as is" means there are no service records or the seller doesn't want you to see them. :(
 

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I would postulate that "as is" means there are no service records or the seller doesn't want you to see them. :(
I bought my BMW "as is." Got books and complete service history.
 

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I would postulate that "as is" means there are no service records or the seller doesn't want you to see them. :(
Actually around here "as is" means it has not been certified if it is from a Honda Dealership. Other dealerships it's anybodies guess.
 

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Actually around here "as is" means it has not been certified if it is from a Honda Dealership. Other dealerships it's anybodies guess.
In my case, at BMW, it meant..
137908

Even if it broke on the way home.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Go here.... Honda Owners Site | Tips, Tools & Benefits for Honda Owners Put in the vin and you will see what Honda knows about the vehicle, Also you can download the PDF version of the owners manual.
Thank you! Very Helpful. My Pilot's got 143K miles and my biggest concern is that the timing belt etc. got changed when that should have. I entered my VIN and a record was there for 90,000 mile service. Daltongang, do you think that timing belt would be part of a 90,000 mile service? I could take it somewhere for a post purchase inspection, just want to make sure she is getting the love she deserves and I really appreciate your advice, Cheers!
 

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Probably not. Timing belt is usually 105000 or 7 years which ever comes first. That is one of those things that if you don't know and can't determine if and when it was done then you are best off doing it. Frankly, if it was me I would change out all of the fluids as well, unless you know that some or all of them were done. Oil, ATF, differential, power steering and brake fluid.

If you can DIY most or all of that you will save yourself a bunch of money. If not the money spent now will in all likely hood be cheaper than the money spent if you have a problem. A broken timing belt will be a $4000 - $8000 job depending on whether you decide to put in a rebuild or a new engine.

A rule of thumb I was raised with was you should plan on spending around $2000 more on a used vehicle than the price paid, unless you are buying a certified use vehicle that comes with a warranty. That is in todays dollars. When I was young it would have been $300 - $500. That money is to address the exact concerns you are expressing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
"As is
Probably not. Timing belt is usually 105000 or 7 years which ever comes first. That is one of those things that if you don't know and can't determine if and when it was done then you are best off doing it. Frankly, if it was me I would change out all of the fluids as well, unless you know that some or all of them were done. Oil, ATF, differential, power steering and brake fluid.

If you can DIY most or all of that you will save yourself a bunch of money. If not the money spent now will in all likely hood be cheaper than the money spent if you have a problem. A broken timing belt will be a $4000 - $8000 job depending on whether you decide to put in a rebuild or a new engine.

A rule of thumb I was raised with was you should plan on spending around $2000 more on a used vehicle than the price paid, unless you are buying a certified use vehicle that comes with a warranty. That is in todays dollars. When I was young it would have been $300 - $500. That money is to address the exact concerns you are expressing.
Probably not. Timing belt is usually 105000 or 7 years which ever comes first. That is one of those things that if you don't know and can't determine if and when it was done then you are best off doing it. Frankly, if it was me I would change out all of the fluids as well, unless you know that some or all of them were done. Oil, ATF, differential, power steering and brake fluid.

If you can DIY most or all of that you will save yourself a bunch of money. If not the money spent now will in all likely hood be cheaper than the money spent if you have a problem. A broken timing belt will be a $4000 - $8000 job depending on whether you decide to put in a rebuild or a new engine.

A rule of thumb I was raised with was you should plan on spending around $2000 more on a used vehicle than the price paid, unless you are buying a certified use vehicle that comes with a warranty. That is in todays dollars. When I was young it would have been $300 - $500. That money is to address the exact concerns you are expressing.
I appreciate the advice thank you! Since I'm not planning to D.I.Y it, will look for the best Pilot mechanic in my area.I think she is good but I agree it's worth it to make sure the essentials have been handled.
 

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I'd still ask the service dept if they have a record of it being done. Surely the original owner knew of the need. I'd exhaust all possibilities 1st before paying a $1000 to soon. Last resort, you could inspect the belt for wear. With 143k miles, it would be easy to tell.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'd still ask the service dept if they have a record of it being done. Surely the original owner knew of the need. I'd exhaust all possibilities 1st before paying a $1000 to soon. Last resort, you could inspect the belt for wear. With 143k miles, it would be easy to tell.
Thank you Nail Grease. I bought it from a Ford Autonation here in Atlanta area, Marietta. Paid Cash and out the door 'as is', so don't think they are are gonna help me solve any mysteries. Is the timing belt check an easy thing for a good mechanic or me with no tools? I was thinking a post purchase check up may be the way to go sense I don't really know what I am doing or what condition she is in.
 

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Thank you Nail Grease. I bought it from a Ford Autonation here in Atlanta area, Marietta. Paid Cash and out the door 'as is', so don't think they are are gonna help me solve any mysteries. Is the timing belt check an easy thing for a good mechanic or me with no tools? I was thinking a post purchase check up may be the way to go sense I don't really know what I am doing or what condition she is in.
You may be able to inspect the thickness through the timing belt cover hole. There is a removable rubber plug. See if you can get a clear photo. Post here.
 

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You may be able to inspect the thickness through the timing belt cover hole. There is a removable rubber plug. See if you can get a clear photo. Post here.
If not through the hole, you might can remove one of the top timing belt covers. 10mm bolts holding them on
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
If not through the hole, you might can remove one of the top timing belt covers. 10mm bolts holding them on
I did some detective work from the carfax service records and found out the timing belt was replaced at 80,000 mile in 2012. The mechanic I spoke with said replace every 100,00 miles or 7-8 years. My vehicle apparently wasn't being driven 2015-2017, maintenance was done in 17 to get a vehicle up and running that had sat for 2 years. I wonder if that buys more time? Gonna see if I can get it inspected through the top timing belt covers and get some photos to post, as you suggested. Thanks!
 

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Use is not the only thing that causes deterioration in components such as rubber, or fluids. Time plays a big factor as well. You are 8 years out and Honda recommends 7 years. As the old adage goes, you can pay for it now or pay for it later.

Now = $1,200 +/- unless you can do it yourself.

Later = $4,000 -$8000 +/- for a rebuilt or new engine. Interference engines and broken timing belts do not play well together ever.
 

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I did some detective work from the carfax service records and found out the timing belt was replaced at 80,000 mile in 2012. The mechanic I spoke with said replace every 100,00 miles or 7-8 years. My vehicle apparently wasn't being driven 2015-2017, maintenance was done in 17 to get a vehicle up and running that had sat for 2 years. I wonder if that buys more time? Gonna see if I can get it inspected through the top timing belt covers and get some photos to post, as you suggested. Thanks!
It's good that it was done once, but yes, as @Daltongang has stated, your past the time interaval of 7 years that Honda recommends. I push service time back on a lot of things, this is not one of them. Your belt is 8 years old with 63k on it. I'd get it done sooner than later.
 
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