Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Should I just go ahead and change the timing belt etc. when I hit 105000 miles? Or should I wait for the maintenance minder light? TIA
 

·
Registered
2008 Piot SE FWD, 2015 Pilot LX 4WD. 2005 GSX-R1000
Joined
·
2,063 Posts
F that MM light thing- IMHO

Go with the miles/years for the belt, tensioner, water pump

IMHO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,437 Posts
Should I just go ahead and change the timing belt etc. when I hit 105000 miles? Or should I wait for the maintenance minder light? TIA
I do my TB WP job at 90k for peace of mind.
I recently did a 2014 Accord for a family member who had 104k miles. Unknown to him, the tensioner was failing. The belt was stretched and could have failed at any time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: briantii

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
I would and did it already on my 2013 based simply on the belt getting old. 7 years is old enough. Ours only had ~65k miles but was 7 years old. The tensioner on mine was in fact leaking and BAD. I'd do it now if I were you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,256 Posts
After spending a little time looking at statistical methods for failure prediction in an industrial environment, I'll suggest that the MM and 105k guidance from Honda is a combination of 'just before the failure line slopes up' section of the bell curve, the lawyers full employment act, some blind prediction of the run conditions the belt has seen, and the square root of the time of day and air temperature on any given day. In the end, Honda wants you to change the belt and be happy that it didn't break. They don't want it to break, because that would make you unhappy and they don't want that!

My 2013 car (October 2012 production date) is now past eight years, but has barely 50k on the odometer. Like briantii, I'll end up doing mine in the spring, the second in a series of timing-belt-festival projects that will likely start in April or so when the state stops using deicer slurry here and it's safe to drive the other cars.

I drive mine a lot easier than he drives his, so I've got to be good for a few extra months before the tensioner gives up. ;) I hope so anyway.

FWIW, timing belt intervals should be related to the amount of fuel that's passed through the engine. Fuel consumption is an OK determining factor for wear and tear on the driveline pieces. I'm not quite ready to test my hypothesis yet though. I do have the 4Runner (timing chain) as a parts-getter if I decide I'm bored and need to attack the Pilot for a belt kit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I would and did it already on my 2013 based simply on the belt getting old. 7 years is old enough. Ours only had ~65k miles but was 7 years old. The tensioner on mine was in fact leaking and BAD. I'd do it now if I were you.
I can ask my hubby hes a mechanic is that allowed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,256 Posts
Sure! ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: plplplpl

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
After spending a little time looking at statistical methods for failure prediction in an industrial environment, I'll suggest that the MM and 105k guidance from Honda is a combination of 'just before the failure line slopes up' section of the bell curve, the lawyers full employment act, some blind prediction of the run conditions the belt has seen, and the square root of the time of day and air temperature on any given day. In the end, Honda wants you to change the belt and be happy that it didn't break. They don't want it to break, because that would make you unhappy and they don't want that!
Using just the square root of the time of day and air temperature will yield and answer 12.435 liters of gasoline short of a month unless you include the relative humidity using a dry/wet bulb hygrometer spun 22.1654 times in a full 363 degree arc on a 12.45' wire rope with a tangential acceleration no less than 13.4 g's. The diameter of the wire doesn't matter as long as you're wearing shoes. I'm surprised you didn't know that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
695 Posts
2-3k miles either way is no big deal, IMHO. I went for service when my MM was already showing '0% oil life' recently, car was at like 98k. They had a package deal on timing belt + other belts at the time, so I went for it. For piece of mind, I would do timing belt on the last maintenance visit before 100k. But if you do it on the first after (i.e. 100-105k) that should be fine as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,256 Posts
Using just the square root of the time of day and air temperature will yield and answer 12.435 liters of gasoline short of a month unless you include the relative humidity using a dry/wet bulb hygrometer spun 22.1654 times in a full 363 degree arc on a 12.45' wire rope with a tangential acceleration no less than 13.4 g's. The diameter of the wire doesn't matter as long as you're wearing shoes. I'm surprised you didn't know that.

There's a potential flaw in your reasoning. Caused by mixing imperial and metric units. Recalculate and resubmit...

Plus I should have simplified to "air density" so it includes thermometer in degrees Kelvin, barometer in inches HGa, and actual moisture content in g/l. These integrate with fuel mass and fuel BTU/kg.

:geek:
 
  • Like
Reactions: plplplpl

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
There's a potential flaw in your reasoning. Caused by mixing imperial and metric units. Recalculate and resubmit...

Plus I should have simplified to "air density" so it includes thermometer in degrees Kelvin, barometer in inches HGa, and actual moisture content in g/l. These integrate with fuel mass and fuel BTU/kg.

:geek:
Every time I start accidentally setting a torque value on the metric side of the torque wrench (N-M) I'm reminded of the NASA Mars Orbiter flight where the enroute flight corrections were based on pound-seconds on the spaceship computer and newton-seconds on the ground. It ended up about 100 miles too low at orbit insertion and didn't have the power to recover. $720 million and 15 years of work .... SPLAT! I was at Lockheed at the time but wasn't on that program. The stuff I launched is still up there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,256 Posts
Amen my brother! My consulting gigs used to take me to different parts of the world, and it often took a few days of mental gymnastics before the brain settles into local units conventions. Truth be told, imperial units and US conventions make no sense in almost all engineering disciplines. No fixed conventions yet in space. Hopefully "give an inch" never gets a toehold. ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: plplplpl

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
Amen my brother! My consulting gigs used to take me to different parts of the world, and it often took a few days of mental gymnastics before the brain settles into local units conventions. Truth be told, imperial units and US conventions make no sense in almost all engineering disciplines. No fixed conventions yet in space. Hopefully "give an inch" never gets a toehold. ;)
Yep metric at work, Imperial at home ... it's enough to keep your mind from getting flabby ... to add to the confusion, men measure theirs in inches, while women in childbirth dilate in centimeters. You'd think mating parts would ... well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Should I just go ahead and change the timing belt etc. when I hit 105000 miles? Or should I wait for the maintenance minder light? TIA
If you know you're going to get it done, it may pay to get to the dealer just before 100k. I took mine in (tensioner was making noise) at 97,000. Because I was still under 100k, they replaced joints under warranty for me as well. If I had waited until after 100k... wouldn't have been covered. They're under an extended warranty for 7yr/100k. It was a $350+ job done for free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,437 Posts
If you know you're going to get it done, it may pay to get to the dealer just before 100k. I took mine in (tensioner was making noise) at 97,000. Because I was still under 100k, they replaced joints under warranty for me as well. If I had waited until after 100k... wouldn't have been covered. They're under an extended warranty for 7yr/100k. It was a $350+ job done for free.
Wow, Now I know why they recommend the timing belt water pump job at 105k. It used to be 90k years ago.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top