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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Folks
I love the site and my pilot with 236k miles! Got new tires and the young grease monkey that put them on said he didn’t have every size torque “stick” so he put 100 ft-lbs on my wheel lug nuts. Is this too tight ? What might happen? Thanks very much for any replies. Paul
 

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Owner's Manual says:

Tighten the wheel nuts to:
80 lbf·ft (108 N·m , 11 kgf·m)
 

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I don't know the exact torque spec, but I have been using 90 ft-lbs for my Pilot. I don't think that 100 will be a problem, as long as he worked his way up evenly and in a couple stages, not just one-shot each bolt and walk away. The lugs should be tightened in an every-other-bolt pattern, around and around until you finally hit the spec torque.

i stand corrected by plpl above. 100 is probably too high. This could possibly cause rotor warping, especially if the guy was a hack. Bring it back and have him loosen and then redo to proper torque, in stages.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies. I will get him to redo. When I asked him he said it should be at 94. Don’t know where he got that.
 

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This may be one of those instances to consider learning a basic DIY procedure. My recommendation is to pick up a good torque wrench, learn how to use it and take care of this precision tool. Potential issues caused by over-tightened lugs are never pleasant to discover especially on the road.
 

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Hey Folks
I love the site and my pilot with 236k miles! Got new tires and the young grease monkey that put them on said he didn’t have every size torque “stick” so he put 100 ft-lbs on my wheel lug nuts. Is this too tight ? What might happen? Thanks very much for any replies. Paul
A shop doesn't have an adjustable torque wrench ? I would remove that shop from my list.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes, I certainly could correct the mistake the shop made with a good air ratchet. But what is a shame is I couldn’t trust shop technician to do it correctly from the start. By the way, would my pancake compressor handle a good air wrench?
 

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Use a 4-way lug wrench to try loosening the lug nuts. Follow the lug tightening pattern on post#4 for proper tightening when you pick up/ borrow a torque wrench. Super tight lugs can be loosened with a breaker bar or cheater. Over-tightened lug nuts can damage rotors as well as the studs. Assuming they were tightened to only 100 there's still a good chance everything should be fine since you're correcting the issue.
 

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[QUOTE="PaulCruser, post: 1641676, member: 245073By the way, would my pancake compressor handle a good air wrench?
[/QUOTE]
The small compressor is a poor match for most air powered tools. Try some grunt+muscle and if you're still struggling a 24"-30" breaker bar should do it easily. Harbor Freight has some good inexpensive breaker bars (Pittsburgh pro) under $25 as well as torque wrenches around a hundred with Internet coupons.
 

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Get a extendable handle 1/2 ratchet that extends to 24 inches and you should be able to loosen lug nuts in just about all cases. I like the Titan 12073 - amazon has for $33, I keep one in each car. You will need a 19 mm deepish socket for Pilots of this generation. I like the TITAN 21092 $10 on Amazon. You can also find slightly less expensive impact sockets. I suggest getting an impact rated socket so you have it when you want to use an impact wrench of some type in the future.

The ratchet will work fine for most people. I would avoid an air impact gun unless you have a decent size air compressor. The cheapest way is probably the Harbor Freight “7 Amp Corded 1/2 In. Impact Wrench”. My use says the torque is good enough for wheel nuts. They also sell a Bauer corded electric impact that has more torque, but it is about $100 - I wish I had bought at intro pricing around $50.

I use the hand ratchet mainly when I do my tire rotations. I also have a Milwaukee “mid torque” 18v impact which is use rarely for tough stuff or tight spaces - loosening brake caliper bracket bolts and that stupid ATF fill bolt.
 

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For torquing, get a 25-250 ftlb 1/2 torque wrench. I have been happy with a TEKTON 24340 1/2 Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench (25-250 ft.-lb.). Walmart and Amazon sell them. I dont have any experience with the Harbor Freight ones, but they look suspiciously similar to Tekton.
 

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I have a Ryobi electric impact gun for deck screws (hex chuck not a square end for sockets). I start the lug nuts by hand then zip them on with that until it starts to "hammer". Then I finish them to the correct torque via my torque wrench. Usually this method gets me within half a turn of the final placement for the lug nuts.
 

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Overtorqueing is not good. Especially if it is done with an impact gun/air wrench and Especially if you have a locking lugnut (the one where you have the key nut). The locking lugnut is a hardened steel and may crack/break/shatter the next time someone goes to remove the lugnuts. Then there is the half day or so down time while you wait for them to extract your wheel, replace the lug and the lug nut. Also, the lugs are made of a softer steel as are the threads inside the lugnut. Over torqueing will stretch the threads, may bend the lugs, and will likely cause the lugnuts to bind and gall on the next removal resulting in broken/twisted off lugs. Again, more downtime while waiting for replacement lugs and lugnuts. I learned from experience. Most newbie tireshop personnel have not been trained on what happens when you over tighten the lugnuts.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Great information. Thanks. I took it back the next day and had the shop owner supervise the retightening to correct 80 ft lbs
 

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I've always torqued the lug nuts by hand with the spare tire tool in the back, torquing to a smidge less than all my strength. I've never had any issues.

Is there a reason why I should be taking out my torque wrench and torquing to factory specs? Has anyone actually experienced issues doing it the way I described above?

--Chris N.
 

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I've always torqued the lug nuts by hand with the spare tire tool in the back, torquing to a smidge less than all my strength. I've never had any issues.

Is there a reason why I should be taking out my torque wrench and torquing to factory specs? Has anyone actually experienced issues doing it the way I described above?

--Chris N.
Gotta be honest here, that's what I do and have always done. I have yet to lose a wheel or even have a lug nut loosen. And this despite driving over our afterscape potholed roads.
 

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I've always torqued the lug nuts by hand with the spare tire tool in the back, torquing to a smidge less than all my strength. I've never had any issues.

Is there a reason why I should be taking out my torque wrench and torquing to factory specs? Has anyone actually experienced issues doing it the way I described above?

--Chris N.
I think the danger to this is “a smidge less than all my strength” varies from person to person. One person may be able to achieve only 50 ft-lb while a defensive lineman might break the lug off. Plus you don’t know how uniform the torque applied to the lugs on a given wheel are.

The engineers list a value which guarantees the wheels will remain attached to the vehicle while at the same time not compromising other components. I am a believer that if the engineer took the time to determine the torque spec then I’m going to follow that advice. Just my opinion.
 
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