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I have a lot of hand tools and a 1/2" and 3/4" air impact but no air compressor. I have other air tools too from when I was a mechanic 10 years ago. Should I buy an air compressor (not sure which one would do the trick) or buy an electric impact?

I plan to buy the Aisin timing belt kit soon from Rockauto. Spark plugs have been replaced and VCM disabled. What else should be done at the same time?
 

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I gather the Lisle heavy mass 19mm impact socket is a popular choice (Amazon, about $30) when used with an impact wrench. The idea being it doesn't flex like a standard socket, so the impact does a better job of jolting the bolt loose. Douse the bolt with some penetrating oil over a couple days before you try it, but try to keep it off the serpentine belt. Since the serpentine belt has to come off anyway, might as well replace it. You'll still need the crank holding tool to tighten the bolt back on, but be aware the heavy mass socket won't work with the crank holding tool, too wide to fit.

Electric impacts can do the job too. Probably cheaper than a new compressor. I have to cross the bridge of timing belt replacement in the not-too-distant future myself.

I don't know what year the starter became controlled by the ECU, but the trick of bracing the wrench against the lower control arm and bumping the starter isn't a good idea with newer ones, unless you can turn the key to off quickly. I know my '15 keeps cranking until the engine starts even if just bump the key.

Checking valve lash isn't a bad idea at that mileage.
 

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I have a fairly serious set of tools, I first used a 1/2 24" Proto breaker bar with 19 mm 6-point socket, and the balancer immobilizer tool on another ratchet. Nothing moved. The car was on the ground/jack, maybe on a lift getting underneath with a cheater bar might have worked, I don't know. I've easily removed axle nuts with this bar previously; these are usually torqued to well over 200 ft-lbs.

Then I used my Milwaukee Fuel M18 1/2 impact with a standard impact socket. Hammered it good - no movement.

Then I got the big Lisle socket, put it on the Milwaukee and the bolt buzzed off like a lug nut. The Milwaukee maybe hit 5 or so blows before the bolt came out.
 

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I consider a compressor as a necessity. Just to keep all my tires aired up.
If you would like to bust a crankshaft pulley bolt with just what you have, you need a Crankshaft pulley bolt removal tool. This holds the crankshaft pulley in place. My local O'Reilly parts store has a loaner tool program that with a deposit you can use and return for free. You will need a 19mm socket, about 2ft of 1/2 inch good quality extensions (to get past the fender well), impact grade preferably no cheap stuff. A long breaker bar to attach to it, a 4ft cheater pipe that will slip over the breaker bar handle, and a jack stand.
Fun stuff! Take pride in busting this bolt the manly way, knowing you have entered a club of the few who can beat their chest in triumph.
146365
 

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The Lisle socket with a 1/2 inch impact and ~150 feet of hose @ 90psi took mine off just like it was a standard torqued lug nut. First time the pulley had been off. Zero issues or drama. Mine came off just like shown in SMA's video:

 

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I consider a compressor as a necessity. Just to keep all my tires aired up.
If you would like to bust a crankshaft pulley bolt with just what you have, you need a Crankshaft pulley bolt removal tool. This holds the crankshaft pulley in place. My local O'Reilly parts store has a loaner tool program that with a deposit you can use and return for free. You will need a 19mm socket, about 2ft of 1/2 inch good quality extensions (to get past the fender well), impact grade preferably no cheap stuff. A long breaker bar to attach to it, a 4ft cheater pipe that will slip over the breaker bar handle, and a jack stand.
Fun stuff! Take pride in busting this bolt the manly way, knowing you have entered a club of the few who can beat their chest in triumph.
View attachment 146365
Do you have to heat the bolt? Not sure how much heat the crank seal can take. I've heard that the impact method isn't good for the crank bearings. I dunno, seems combustion forces are pretty "shocking" to them and they hold up.

The setup used to hold the propeller on the prop shaft is about foolproof and easy to get off. There's a washer with tabs that's keyed to the splined shaft and you bend the tabs up around the nut so it's not possible for it to loosen. To get it off you just bend the tabs down and the nut comes off. Nothing depends on friction or torque. The SS four blade prop weighs more than the Honda crank pulley and is subject to more rotational shock in both directions by the clutch dog setup on the lower unit. The 200 plus ft-lb setup on that crank bolt is dumber than VCM, IMO. I guess they don't want you changing your own TB.
 

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The Lisle socket with a 1/2 inch impact and ~150 feet of hose @ 90psi took mine off just like it was a standard torqued lug nut. First time the pulley had been off. Zero issues or drama. Mine came off just like shown in SMA's video:

Will it work with only 95 feet of hose? :rolleyes:

More importantly, happen to know how much breaking torque your 1/2" can generate with 90 psi and any hose that reaches the car ?
 

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Isn't there a fuse or relay you can remove on the 2012 - 2015 to use the "bump the starter" method to keep the engine from starting? If so...which one is it?
 

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Do you have to heat the bolt? Not sure how much heat the crank seal can take. I've heard that the impact method isn't good for the crank bearings. I dunno, seems combustion forces are pretty "shocking" to them and they hold up.
Heat on the bolt for a minute won't hurt the seal. If it starts to glow red, your using to much. How hot is the engine when running? But... If you got good extensions that won't twist off, a long enough cheat pipe and a couple 100 lbs of bodyweight, you should be good without heat.
The setup used to hold the propeller on the prop shaft is about foolproof and easy to get off. There's a washer with tabs that's keyed to the splined shaft and you bend the tabs up around the nut so it's not possible for it to loosen. To get it off you just bend the tabs down and the nut comes off. Nothing depends on friction or torque. The SS four blade prop weighs more than the Honda crank pulley and is subject to more rotational shock in both directions by the clutch dog setup on the lower unit. The 200 plus ft-lb setup on that crank bolt is dumber than VCM, IMO. I guess they don't want you changing your own TB.
You hear all the reasons about vibration as being the need for such tremendous torque on this bolt. I to would say it's overkill and a smaller bolt would suffice. I do recall one Piloteer in the last year who gave up trying to bust this bolt and took it to a shop. So there may be some truth to your accusation.
 

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Isn't there a fuse or relay you can remove on the 2012 - 2015 to use the "bump the starter" method to keep the engine from starting? If so...which one is it?
I know this method works, but is there a possibility of hurting the starter or worse, breaking a tooth off the flywheel? That would be very costly.
 

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Isn't there a fuse or relay you can remove on the 2012 - 2015 to use the "bump the starter" method to keep the engine from starting? If so...which one is it?
There is but I think the safest way to do this method is to leave the key out of range and use one of those remote start jumper cables where one wire clips onto the battery and the other to the starter with a momentary contact push button. They're used for compression testing where you need to be at the engine, not behind the wheel. Here are some samples of what I'm talking about. Just make sure any body parts you value are not in line with anything that could snap,break off and get flung off when you hit the starter.
Remote Start Switches | O'Reilly Auto Parts
 

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There is but I think the safest way to do this method is to leave the key out of range and use one of those remote start jumper cables where one wire clips onto the battery and the other to the starter with a momentary contact push button. They're used for compression testing where you need to be at the engine, not behind the wheel. Here are some samples of what I'm talking about. Just make sure any body parts you value are not in line with anything that could snap,break off and get flung off when you hit the starter.
Remote Start Switches | O'Reilly Auto Parts
I don't have a remote key thingy. I've done the bump start method before on a Volvo with good results. So I was inquiring as a bail out plan if I cannot get the bolt off another way. If I can find my 19mm socket...
 

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I don't have a remote key thingy. I've done the bump start method before on a Volvo with good results. So I was inquiring as a bail out plan if I cannot get the bolt off another way. If I can find my 19mm socket...
I've done it with regular battery jumper cables, just touching the two clamps together. Use both cables, not one and not touching the end not attached to the starter to the battery. You'll get a spark at the battery which could cause a bad accident if there is outgassed hydrogen in the vicinity.
 

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I've done it with regular battery jumper cables, just touching the two clamps together. Use both cables, not one and not touching the end not attached to the starter to the battery. You'll get a spark at the battery which could cause a bad accident if there is outgassed hydrogen in the vicinity.
Trying to imagine this in my mind. Picture?
 

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I've done it with regular battery jumper cables, just touching the two clamps together. Use both cables, not one and not touching the end not attached to the starter to the battery. You'll get a spark at the battery which could cause a bad accident if there is outgassed hydrogen in the vicinity.
The bolt is torqued at 180Lb. Since its been on there so long, it requires way more force than that to bust loose, I'd really discourage this method, though it does work. 🤦‍♂️
 
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Trying to imagine this in my mind. Picture?
A is one jumper cable A1 clamped to the battery positivee + terminal
B is the other jumper cable B1 clamped to terminal M on the starter solenoid
C is where you temporarily touch the clamps at the A2 B2 ends of both cables away from the battery and the starter.
Notice the starter solenoid is open, so this whole mess is isolated from the sensitive electronics in the PCM and also the ignition system.
Basically you are hot wiring the starter motor independent of any car electronics. The starter will run as long as you hold the clamps together at C and stop the second you break that contact. Touch the clamps like you mean it so the Bendix engages firmly and immediately, reducing the chance of chipped or broken ring gear teeth. If you baby it or keep trying if it fails, you could damage the ring gear or starter gear/bendix.or burn up the starter motor. The goal is to shock the bolt loose, not try to force it loose with the inadequate power of the starter motor.

If you use the remote starter switch with lighter gauge wire, connect one wire to terminal B and the other to terminal S on the starter solenoid. The PCM will still be safely isolated as long as starter cut relay #2 (located in the under dash fuse box) is unpowered. You could unplug it for belt and suspenders peace of mind.

146377
 

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After soliciting some local pricing, it looks like I'll be doing this myself. My hope is that my monster air impact will be able to handle it. From what I understand it sounds like these either come off with no issue or they fight like crazy.
 
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A is one jumper cable A1 clamped to the battery positivee + terminal
B is the other jumper cable B1 clamped to terminal M on the starter solenoid
C is where you temporarily touch the clamps at the A2 B2 ends of both cables away from the battery and the starter.
Notice the starter solenoid is open, so this whole mess is isolated from the sensitive electronics in the PCM and also the ignition system.
Basically you are hot wiring the starter motor independent of any car electronics. The starter will run as long as you hold the clamps together at C and stop the second you break that contact. Touch the clamps like you mean it so the Bendix engages firmly and immediately, reducing the chance of chipped or broken ring gear teeth. If you baby it or keep trying if it fails, you could damage the ring gear or starter gear/bendix.or burn up the starter motor.

View attachment 146377
Ahh....i get it. Thank you.


The bolt is torqued at 180Lb. Since its been on there so long, it requires way more force than that to bust loose, I'd really discourage this method, though it does work. 🤦‍♂️
This is kind of a contradiction. If it does work...then it would not require way more force than it can provide.
 

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After soliciting some local pricing, it looks like I'll be doing this myself. My hope is that my monster air impact will be able to handle it. From what I understand it sounds like these either come off with no issue or they fight like crazy.
The fan club/cheering squad is behind you 100%, all the way. 😁👍
146379
 
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