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What did you do today to your 2003-2008 Pilot?

162609 Views 2523 Replies 97 Participants Last post by  plplplpl
4
Replaced NGK Laser Platinum spark plugs with NGK Ruthenium HX plugs on my 03'. Oil change with Amsoil 0w-40 Signature Series oil and Amsoil EA filter. Why 0w-40 instead of the recommended 5w-20? The 0w will flow a little faster on cold starts in the winter and the 40 will protect much better on 90F+ (outside air temp.) summer days.

Also, I called NGK and verified that sparkplugs.com is an authorized distributor/seller (they didn't have them listed on their website) so, I get real plugs and not counterfeits. Yes, there is a whole world of fake/counterfeit auto parts out there and I would recommend not buying auto parts off of Ebay. If you're not buying directly from the stealership, definitely go to the manufactures website and look up their authorized distributor/seller's and if they don't have this information posted give them a call.

Here are some fun for the whole family spark plug pics:

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Man.... you must live up north some where. If in the south- welllll.... you are tougher than I am!! How did you confirm the compressor is shot? I鈥檓 wanting to learn something here 馃槈馃憤
Currently, I live in SW Missouri. It definitely gets hot here, but my car has always been the one only I drive, and the wife's car is the one with AC. I bought this Pilot specifically to use as a traveling car for us and 3-4 kids, so now that it's warming up again I need to make it cool inside. I won't mind driving a car with AC though, don't get me wrong.

I haven't specifically diagnosed the compressor as being faulty, but I've replaced all the fuses and relays for the AC system and the compressor still won't kick on. Whether the R-134a in the system is good or not I couldn't tell you, but the system maintains pressure. There aren't too many things it can be at this point, so I'm replacing the compressor, the expansion valves, and the drier dessicant and fittings. We're going to blow out the lines and the condenser, so any debris should be gone for the most part. I don't think the compressor blew up or anything, it spins freely and makes no noise or anything. Once we recharge the system, if it still doesn't kick on, I think there might be one or two more things to check, but I'd be surprised if that doesn't fix it.

I kinda debated this before (on these forums, btw) and decided that I'd pretty much just go ahead and replace the bulk of the system due to the 2006 having over 200k miles on it. If it's good now, it might still crap out in another month and I'd have to replace the parts anyway. I kinda see it like the timing belt...might as well just go ahead and make sure. Hopefully it will last a good long time after I fix it.
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Finally got around to swapping out my power steering o-rings, replacing the AC compressor and condenser, charging the system and enjoying the cold air. Also installed a 2" receiver hitch to tow with.

I love my Pilot!
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From the bottom. I also replaced all the O-rings I could reach, but didn't go inside the cabin to do any yet. I left the expansion valves alone, too. It seems to be fine, but if it starts leaking slowly I may go back and finish the rest of the O-rings and recharge it.
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Sorry, thought I answered this already...lol

I used two cans of straight R-134a from Walmart and shot in a couple of ounces of this stuff to finish off the amount needed:
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I figured a tiny bit of the UV dye from this would be handy, just hope this doesn't have too much goo in it that doesn't need to be there. I bought that kit to find the leaks, if I had any, but the old compressor never activated to put enough pressure on the system to tell. I have a slight niggling doubt about the low side schraeder valve, time will tell on that one though.

So far, it's too cold on the lowest setting, so I think I'm in good shape. Just gotta get the rear AC blowing now!
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For the past days and for my first time...
  • I changed the Engine oil (Honda OEM) but plan to change it again with 0w-40 because here in Yukon it goes easily below -50c in winter.
  • Changed the Differential fluid (Honda VTM-4)
  • Changed the Transmission fluid (did 2times, waiting for a box of Maxlife being shipped, for a 3rd time) & via the dipstick method (I highly recommend)
  • Changed the Cabin Air filter
  • Changed the Engine Air filter
=> My plan is to clean the EGR port (if very dirty change the EGR valve but not probably myself, I don't feel confident enough... I think I could "possibly" do it if I did not need my car running everyday to pick up the kids, etc).

=> I am debating with myself on the idea of changing to new headlight assembly as mine are quite yellowish. 2 years ago, I polished them to clean them up, it looked good after however it soon became yellowish again... I wonder how tricky it is to do that job? Will I run into trouble (to align the assembly / will the headlight will be correctly adjust for the road or will it take forever to adjust them on my own...) It might not be worth as this is just cosmetic (and I am probably the only one who notice it anyway...haha :p)

Take a look at this, I think all you needed to do was clearcoat the headlights. Might save you a bundle if you wanna clean them up again.

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I'm a bit ticked off today. My wonderfully cold AC stopped blowing cold and reverted to the same outside temp air (with all the humidity) I had before replacing the compressor and condenser. I'm also hearing a loud hissing noise which sounds distinctly like a leak of some sort under my dash on the passenger side.

I've read several posts here mentioning the hissing, but I just replaced my cabin air filter. Coupled with the sudden crappy air temps, I'm assuming I have a leak in the system. I'm going out in a few to check the pressure in the high and low sides to see if I've lost any...which I expect to see. I'm going to look under the dash and check everything, though my handy-dandy UV pen light to check for AC dye doesn't seem to be functional. Grr.
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Diagnosed my AC problem, turns out it was a leaking schrader valve on the low pressure side. Makes sense now why the vacuum leak test went perfectly (held solid at -29 psi for two hours with no vacuum pump started), because the hose and gauges set I used to read said pressure kept the system sealed. New valves on order, hopefully will have this straightened out in a few days.

I also got rid of my random misfire and specific cylinder misfire codes, though. I replaced the coils and injectors, as well as the gasket/filter screen for the VTEC solenoid.

My test drive ran pretty nice, except the CEL came back on during the trip, still got the P2646 code saying the Rocker arm oil pressure switch circuit has low voltage. From what I've read, the clogged filter screen on the gasket is the most common culprit, but since that's replaced I might need to swap out the switch itself. I read that it also may be a connector or wiring issue as well, but I am inexperienced and underequipped to start testing all the electrical connectors and wiring. I might just replace the switch and see what happens.

Gotta rest up though, I also received new KYB struts and shocks for all 4 corners, the timing belt kit is on the way (already got the motor mount), and I also got the compressor/condenser set for my old Infiniti I'm giving to my son. Gotta swap out and clean that entire AC system and then replace all the seals on the power steering pump and rack and pinion and the thermostat. And I also just ordered new ignition coils and sway bar end links for the wife's Elantra.

BRB, gonna take a nap for two days straight. 馃檮
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Got my AC system working again, turns out the schrader valves were shot. Replaced those and vacuumed/recharged the R-134a, so now we wait to see if the system leaks again. I'm pretty sure that was the only problem since the vacuum test held at -29 for two hours. Makes sense why that wouldn't have shown up last time though, since the schrader valves are actually open during the test. That's the only point not checkable by a continuous vacuum hold.

Air blows too cold again, had to turn up the thermostat slightly. Good problem to have, lol.

Next up is the V-TEC switch, the struts and shocks, and the timing belt (finally).
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Got my AC system working again, turns out the schrader valves were shot. Replaced those and vacuumed/recharged the R-134a, so now we wait to see if the system leaks again. I'm pretty sure that was the only problem since the vacuum test held at -29 for two hours. Makes sense why that wouldn't have shown up last time though, since the schrader valves are actually open during the test. That's the only point not checkable by a continuous vacuum hold.

Air blows too cold again, had to turn up the thermostat slightly. Good problem to have, lol.

Next up is the V-TEC switch, the struts and shocks, and the timing belt (finally).
Got in the Pilot after work, and...no cold air.

I guess there's nothing for it but to go through and replace every damn o-ring now. I really hoped I wouldn't need to do that.
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I have a set of KYBs for all 4 corners sitting in the garage right now, but I'm too busy fixing my wife's Elantra and my old Infiniti Q45 that I'm gifting to my stepson.

The Elantra's trunk won't open, either with the fob or the latch inside the car. The seats are going to have to come out on one side for me to get into the trunk and open it, and I'm not looking forward to this. I looked at her manual and I think I can get the seats unbolted without toooooooo much hassle. We'll see. Also, her CEL finally came on, first time in 227,000 miles: Cylinder 2 misfire and the cam position sensor. I just put new coil packs on all four and that didn't do it, so I'm going to toss in a new injector too and see if that clears it up.

The Q though...sigh. New AC comp/condenser kit, new O-ring set, I have to rebuild the power steering pump to hopefully avoid buying a new one, and maybe replace some hoses for the PS system. I need to figure out the tapping coming from the valve area, hoping it's just an adjustment. Doesn't sound bad, but I don't want to screw around with it. That car only has 177,000 miles and looks/drives very well still. Parts are SCARCE for it. Can't even find front struts in the USA, at any price.
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Ouch!! I sincerely hope it didn't bork your valves.

Good luck!

Btw, how did you rebuild your rear blower motor? I don't want to spend $100+ on a new one right now.
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Post # 36, & 37.
Thanks a million! I think I can afford that, if I can't get one from the boneyard, that is. Time is almost as valuable as actual money these days, lol....
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Maaaannnn..... you got your work cut out for ya!!! Let us know how it goes!
Okay, so...I was finally able to unbolt the rear seats from the Elantra and reach up behind one to release the latch holding it in place. Then I could get into the trunk. Once inside, I quickly had the chilling realization that the emergency trunk release was not working, either. If I were to be kidnapped in my wife's car, I'd have been well and truly screwed.

After much cursing and swearing and foul-mouthedness I managed to get the trunk latch unbolted after I figured out it was inoperable. That allowed me to open the trunk and get a better idea of the magnitude of the issue, a busted latch assembly. Turns out the latch assembly sells on RA for a measly $35 or so, so I have one on order. It took me a good hour+ to get the rear seats all re-bolted in place and everything tucked in. Before I finished though, I literally removed the seat fold-down latch that is only accessible from inside the trunk, so one side of the fold-down back seat will not latch. Then I took some heavy gauge wire and tied the crap out of the trunk lid from the inside. Now everything's back in place and the rear seats are still usable. Trunk too, but you have to load and unload it from the rear of the passenger compartment, lmao...

In a few days I'll have a nice, FUNCTIONAL latch installed back in the trunk and all will be right with the world.

Oh, and the part of the trunk latch that broke? A small plastic arm that held tension via a small spring, holding the arm out of the way once the trunk is unlatched, and moving over when latched. Literally a cheap little plastic part breaking caused me 7 hours of sweaty grief. I'm not a huge fan of Hyundai Motors right this second.
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So I finally, FINALLY did my timing belt/water pump/motor mount replacement. The Pilot has 217K on it currently, and I bought it a year ago at 206K with no assurances that any maintenance had been done at the correct intervals, so this has been a nagging worry for me until now. I finally took a Friday off work to give myself a long weekend just in case, and I was glad for it. I started Friday morning and finished it up Saturday afternoon with no major issues. I did buy a 48" section of galvanized pipe at Lowe's to give my breaker bars that extra oomph, and I'm happy I did.

To loosen the crankshaft bolt I used a trick I'd read about on here that worked like a charm: I attached the hefty and highly recommended 19mm air socket https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00RGNCV1U/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 to my breaker bar positioned down and to the rear of the Pilot, then cranked the engine a quick bump. I heard it crack loose like a quiet gunshot (lol), and was super happy to see that it worked perfectly. As in the several videos I've watched, once that bolt was loose it spun out easily by hand. When I was finishing up the install I used the regular 19mm socket inside the special tool https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000TMLWQ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 that fits into the machined hex of the balancer (connected to my breaker bar in about the same position as when I loosened the bolt) and used another breaker bar with the pipe for leverage. I believe I have it to the correct torque, but it's definitely ridiculously tight. I used the 60 ft-lbs plus 60 degrees method.

So far, so good...the engine is running much more smoothly and sounds great. It seems a little peppier, but that could just be my imagination.
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So I finally, FINALLY did my timing belt/water pump/motor mount replacement. The Pilot has 217K on it currently, and I bought it a year ago at 206K with no assurances that any maintenance had been done at the correct intervals, so this has been a nagging worry for me until now. I finally took a Friday off work to give myself a long weekend just in case, and I was glad for it. I started Friday morning and finished it up Saturday afternoon with no major issues. I did buy a 48" section of galvanized pipe at Lowe's to give my breaker bars that extra oomph, and I'm happy I did.

To loosen the crankshaft bolt I used a trick I'd read about on here that worked like a charm: I attached the hefty and highly recommended 19mm air socket https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00RGNCV1U/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 to my breaker bar positioned down and to the rear of the Pilot, then cranked the engine a quick bump. I heard it crack loose like a quiet gunshot (lol), and was super happy to see that it worked perfectly. As in the several videos I've watched, once that bolt was loose it spun out easily by hand. When I was finishing up the install I used the regular 19mm socket inside the special tool https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000TMLWQ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 that fits into the machined hex of the balancer (connected to my breaker bar in about the same position as when I loosened the bolt) and used another breaker bar with the pipe for leverage. I believe I have it to the correct torque, but it's definitely ridiculously tight. I used the 60 ft-lbs plus 60 degrees method.

So far, so good...the engine is running much more smoothly and sounds great. It seems a little peppier, but that could just be my imagination.
Almost forgot this little bit of fun...

I had decided to go ahead and bite the bullet to do the timing belt partly due to what sounded like my valves tapping really hard all of a sudden. While I know the belt wouldn't fix that, I wanted to make sure that was as good as possible since I figured I needed to adjust the valves again. I had just done this last summer and didn't expect there to be any issues this soon after, but noises don't lie, right?

Wrong!!

When I was under the Pilot inspecting everything before tearing into the timing belt, I happened to see a vertical slat that comes down behind the radiator, right in the center below the hood latch components. The very bottom of it bolts into the crossmember down low, and the bolt had come loose and fallen out. I popped a spare 10mm hex bolt into it and tightened it down snug. The noise went away immediately, so I breathed a heavy sigh of relief.
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For both fixes, you get a double dose of the Piloteers Dancing Banana of Success.

View attachment 159030
Woohoo!!

NGL, I felt pretty successful when the Pilot started right up and purred like a kitten. I'd worried about screwing it up for a long time, part of why I delayed, I guess.
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