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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I own a 2009 Honda Pilot Limited 4WD and when I hit 75 plus M.P.H. I get a vibration both in the seat and steering wheel. If I have a bottle of water on the console, it shakes fairly badly. I had 4 new Goodyear Fortera tires installed and had them balanced twice by 2 different tire shops but still have the vibration. I had the tires rotated, had them put 2 new tires on the front, and had new front rotors installed, but still have the vibration only at 75 plus M.P.H. Other than driving slower, does anyone have any ideas? The Honda dealer's service manager took it out on the highway and confirmed it has a vibration that it shouldn't have, and made an appointment for it to come in. It goes to the Honda dealer next Wednesday.:confused:
 

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Been there. And it always came back to the tires.

What worked for me is when the wheels were balanced I would insist they remount it and spin it to make sure it zeros out before they put it back on Pilot. Nearly every time, we'd fine one or two out and go thru the process again until they zero after removing and replacing on the machine. It worked every time. And even though the techs were frustrated and felt like an a-hole we could not dispute the out of balance findings....and the results.

The problem seems to be the tolerance of some machines, even the Hunter Road force machines, because shops can alter (increase) the tolerance range. The Pilot seems to be very susceptible to mild wheel imbalance, that's most puzzling of all.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I can try the balancing again, but both of the shops balanced them twice, in other words they were balanced a total of 4 times.
 

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I can't tell you how many times I have seen this. Find a shop that has a road force balancer and just don't do a spin balance.
The GSP9700 Vibration Control System includes Hunter's exclusive Road Force Measurement System to help detect potential tire uniformity causes of vibration that are not balance-related. This system utilizes a "road roller" which applies up to 1,400 pounds (635 kg) of force against the wheel and tire assembly to measure their combined uniformity. This simulated road force test helps verify if the assembly is "round" when rolling under load.
 

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. I had the tires rotated, had them put 2 new tires on the front, and had new front rotors installed, but still have the vibration only at 75 plus M.P.H. Other than driving slower, does anyone have any ideas? The Honda dealer's service manager took it out on the highway and confirmed it has a vibration that it shouldn't have, and made an appointment for it to come in. It goes to the Honda dealer next Wednesday.:confused:
As an anecdote, new tires should always be placed on the rear axle. Other than for a general tire rotation, most tire shops won't place new tires on the front end. Has anyone checked front end components, such as tie rod ends and the other components? We have a 2003 Honda Element for our daughter that has 154,000 miles and noises and front end vibrations/shimmying that began at 60mph were quite evident. She works 2 mi away and had not been on the freeway/expressway in several weeks, so it took a freeway drive to discover the front end vibration issues. $1,000 later, after replacing the front axles/boots, tie rod end, strut mounts, and having everything else looked at for wear/replacement recommendations, it drives and handles like new and all the noises and vibrations are now gone. We had replaced a compliance bushing at 110,000 mi on 1 side and the untouched side was still in good condition. I hope your problem is found and dispensed with so you can enjoy a comfortable ride again.
 

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I own a 2009 Honda Pilot Limited 4WD and when I hit 75 plus M.P.H. I get a vibration both in the seat and steering wheel. If I have a bottle of water on the console, it shakes fairly badly. I had 4 new Goodyear Fortera tires installed and had them balanced twice by 2 different tire shops but still have the vibration. I had the tires rotated, had them put 2 new tires on the front, and had new front rotors installed, but still have the vibration only at 75 plus M.P.H.
Was the 75mph vibration occurring before the 4 new tires were installed or did it only start happening afterwards?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It had some vibration but with the new tires it is worse. It rides nice and smooth until you hit 70 M.P.H. and gets worse as speed increases. The steering wheel shakes a small amount but you can see the console and cup holders vibrating. Put a bottle of water in the cup holder, and at 70+ there are ripples in the bottle as the console shakes. Someone suggested that it might be bad lower control arm bushings. :confused:
 

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It had some vibration but with the new tires it is worse. It rides nice and smooth until you hit 70 M.P.H. and gets worse as speed increases. The steering wheel shakes a small amount but you can see the console and cup holders vibrating. Put a bottle of water in the cup holder, and at 70+ there are ripples in the bottle as the console shakes. Someone suggested that it might be bad lower control arm bushings.
It could well be bad bushings.

If you want to confirm/eliminate the tires as the source of the vibration, find a shop with a Hunter GSP9700 wheel balancer.

You can locate one by entering your zip code here: Hunter GSP9700 Wheel vibration Control System solves wheel vibration and tire pull problems that balancers and aligners can't fix

It could be that your tire shop and/or local Honda dealer already has one.
If possible, try the tire shop first.

Have the tires (re)balanced and find out what the value of “road force” is for each tire – the lower the value the better. The GSP9700 can show the technician how to (re)position the tire on the wheel so that any irregularities in the tire and wheel tend to cancel out – this is called "match mounting” and minimizes the amount of net road force. The GSP9700 also has a “match maker” function that compares all four tires to determine which tire should be mounted on which wheel to achieve the lowest net road force across the set of four tires/wheels. Ask the shop personnel up front if they understand how to do this – if not, find another shop that does.

To eliminate detectable vibration, the net road force should be on the order of 15lbs, or less – 10lbs or less would be even better. The pass/fail setting on the GSP9700 is usually about 25lbs – so the fact that the road force measures “OK” may not be sufficient. If the road force is too high, all you can do is keep trying different tires until you find one that measures better/lower.

In over 30 years of Honda/Acura ownership, I’ve never had a set of Goodyear tires that was vibration free. Michelins, OTOH, are almost invariably perfect. Tires from Bridgestone, Yokohama or Toyo, that were made in Japan, seem to exhibit good uniformity, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Update on vibration problem

Well I took my Pilot to the local Honda dealer for the vibration problem. They replaced the right "axle" assembly which includes the CV joint. I than road tested it, and the vibration was a lot less, but still somewhat there. I brought it back to the dealer where they replaced the left axle assembly. Road tested it again, and the vibration was pretty much gone. Luckily, I have the extended warranty! ;)
 

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I can't tell you how many times I have seen this. Find a shop that has a road force balancer and just don't do a spin balance.
The GSP9700 Vibration Control System includes Hunter's exclusive Road Force Measurement System to help detect potential tire uniformity causes of vibration that are not balance-related. This system utilizes a "road roller" which applies up to 1,400 pounds (635 kg) of force against the wheel and tire assembly to measure their combined uniformity. This simulated road force test helps verify if the assembly is "round" when rolling under load.
A road force balancing might help. Had a problem with my former 2001 Ford Explorer. Discount Tires, where I bought the tires, balanced the wheels twice, but I still had a vibration. I took it to the Ford dealer for a road force balance and it turns out there was an out-of-round tire. Discount Tire replaced it under warranty, with tread wear reduction in the cost. As I don't like one new tire on an axle with a tire at about half tread life, and really don't like two new tires and two half-worn tires, I replaced all four.

I was a little upset that Discount Tire didn't find the problem initially as they were able to verify it when I came back with the results of the balancing by the Ford dealer. However, overall, we've been happy with Discount Tire's products and service: free rotation, balancing and road hazard coverage that lasts as long as the tread warranty on the tires (extra cost, but here in AZ with lots of unpaved roads, and roads with nails on them, well worth it).

My wife had a similar problem with her 1995 Volvo 850 Turbo. It turns out that in that case, the balancing machine at Discount Tire had a worn bearing, so the balancing wasn't accurate. They had fixed the machine, so the balancing after that did the trick.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Most of the vibration is gone now, but I notice that when I apply engine power at 70 - 80 MPH the vibration increases, when I let off of the accelerator it decreases. The shop's service manager says that it is good as it gets, that that is normal with the Pilots. I can put up with it now, but am wondering if that is "normal"?:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Fluids changed a little over a year ago which is about 20,000 miles ago. I just set up an appointment for the Hunter Force balancing, guess I'll see if they are out of balance.
 

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Fluids changed a little over a year ago which is about 20,000 miles ago. I just set up an appointment for the Hunter Force balancing, guess I'll see if they are out of balance.
The ultimate test in my experience has been if the tech can balance the wheel/tire, remove it from the machine, then remount it and spin it again...if it zero's, you know you're good. I found it was 50/50, and once we got to 100%, my vibes were gone.

It was related to balancing machine tolerance, which is able to be changed, but few shops will lower it just for you.

Why the Pilot is so sensitive though, is beyond me. I have yet to understand.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I just set up an appointment at a local repair shop that has the Hunter Road Force equipment. He is going to re-balance the tires, and if that does not work, will try and pinpoint the problem. More to follow!:confused:
 

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Could the driveshaft be out of balance or damaged? If a weight fell off the shaft or if it was ever dented or slightly bent, that could cause your vibration.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Not sure if the rear drive shaft is the problem but both front drive shafts were replaced. Going to shop with Hunter Road Force balancer tomorrow.
 

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So I ended up taking this not even a week old 2011 EX Pilot back to the dealer and told them it was vibrating all over the place. They did a inspection and found that I was right, the thing is vibrating down at the gas pedal/brake pedal and it is caused by leaking and broken engine mount. Evidently the mounts are filled with oil. However this vehicle only has 19K miles on it and was a previous lease and is certified. So it is very strange to me, someone that has owned all sorts of Hondas that this happened.

Anyone else clue into this issue?
 
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