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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys, I hate to start another VCM thread. Where I live, its 110-120 degrees F in the summer. If I install one of these disablers, do my cooling fans continue to kick on and off at the factory specified temperaures, or is this altered by the disabler. Does this impact when the A/C condenser fan comes on?

I have been reading post after post and I see the guage in the cluster changes, but not sure what is really going on.

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SVCM and VCM Tuner II both have sections in their FAQs covering this. When VCM is suppressed using these, fans are still controlled by (1) A/C activation and (2) ECT2 temps. With these 2 modern DEVICES as an added safety, once the ECT1 temp goes above 205-212isf F then the device releases ECT1 temp to be read as actual by the ECU. With the old style "muzzlers" there is no releasing of ECT1 but fans will still turn on by A/C and ECT2.
 

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To be more specific:

From S-VCM Controller - Disable VCM / deactivate VCM and stop ECO in Honda Acura
QUOTE ///////
How does the S-VCM Controller work?

It monitors coolant temperature on ECT#1, and feeds a compensated signal to ECU (higher temperatures yield lower signal readings). The compensation is not a constant, because on one hand it should be sufficient to keep the reading below 167F (so VCM does not activate) while the actual coolant temperature fluctuates in driving (the coolant sensor’s resistance also changes); and on the other hand, it should allow the gauge on your dash to reflect temperature fluctuations between 120F and 210F while you are driving.

Most importantly, the compensation is cancelled when S-VCM Controller detects engine overheating, so you can see it on the dash and the ECU can do whatever necessary in response to the true coolant temperature.

Why does it release control when engine overheats? Wouldn’t ECT #2 deal with overheat situations?

ECT #2 will do its part of the job, but it cannot replace ECT#1 on which the VCM deactivation mechanism is being applied. Tests on Honda/Acura vehicles showed that when ECT#1 temp. reading alone is increased to a certain level, the radiator cooling fan kicks in – regardless of the reading on ECT#2. This means that the ECU also relies on ECT#1 to respond to coolant temperature changes. The S-VCM simply lets the ECU handle engine overheating in different scenarios.

The S-VCM Controller is designed to be effective and precisely on target. The design concept is to minimize and control the impact on the cooling system in delivering the required function, and limit interfere with factory settings.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
To be more specific:

From S-VCM Controller - Disable VCM / deactivate VCM and stop ECO in Honda Acura
QUOTE ///////
How does the S-VCM Controller work?

It monitors coolant temperature on ECT#1, and feeds a compensated signal to ECU (higher temperatures yield lower signal readings). The compensation is not a constant, because on one hand it should be sufficient to keep the reading below 167F (so VCM does not activate) while the actual coolant temperature fluctuates in driving (the coolant sensor’s resistance also changes); and on the other hand, it should allow the gauge on your dash to reflect temperature fluctuations between 120F and 210F while you are driving.

Most importantly, the compensation is cancelled when S-VCM Controller detects engine overheating, so you can see it on the dash and the ECU can do whatever necessary in response to the true coolant temperature.

Why does it release control when engine overheats? Wouldn’t ECT #2 deal with overheat situations?

ECT #2 will do its part of the job, but it cannot replace ECT#1 on which the VCM deactivation mechanism is being applied. Tests on Honda/Acura vehicles showed that when ECT#1 temp. reading alone is increased to a certain level, the radiator cooling fan kicks in – regardless of the reading on ECT#2. This means that the ECU also relies on ECT#1 to respond to coolant temperature changes. The S-VCM simply lets the ECU handle engine overheating in different scenarios.

The S-VCM Controller is designed to be effective and precisely on target. The design concept is to minimize and control the impact on the cooling system in delivering the required function, and limit interfere with factory settings.
///////
Thank you! I read this post prior but was perplexed at his use of the word "should".
 

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Thank you! I read this post prior but was perplexed at his use of the word "should".
Fair enough. That is an odd sentence.

Reality is, without using one of these devices, the dash gauge stays locked in the middle with a wide "dead zone" between ~170F and 210F. If you've ever overheated a modern car you know that gauge shoots up rapidly once it reaches a certain point, but is rock solid below that, even as your temps obviously fluctuate with normal stop and go driving. That is what he is alluding to.
 

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2020 Honda Pilot EX-L AWD, 2017 Honda CR-V EX-L AWD
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For where the OP lives, I wish we of the SVCM controller will be disabled most of the time due to the heat. I don’t know eBay thing about engine temp reaction to ambient temps btw. Just curious.


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For where the OP lives, I wish we of the SVCM controller will be disabled most of the time due to the heat. I don’t know eBay thing about engine temp reaction to ambient temps btw. Just curious.


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Typo. I wonder if the SVCM controller will


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Typo. I wonder if the SVCM controller will

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I doubt it. The stock radiator and fans are highly effective at keeping temps in the normal range.

If someone in the hot SW is curious what coolant temps are under normal driving, they could log it with a generic OBDII reader. I bet you'd be surprised just how effective the stock cooling setup is. If I recall from people's driveway tests, the fans kick in at around 190F.
 

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I live in Vegas and just installed the S-VCM recently. I am still gaining confidence in the unit but all seems well. I towed with it too granted ambient temps are still low in the desert. The S-VCM will allow for normal function at 230F which technically should be SUPER safe, but I am considering emailing the owner to see if he can sell me one that will release at 210F for an added cost since I saw a custom section.

In the meantime, I plan to add a switch in-between the battery terminal and the S-VCM so I can disable on the fly. Maybe that will take away my worries of running on the hot side. I have been monitoring my engine temps with a Scan Gauge II scanner for about a year now and in the summer I have seen engine temps in the 210F+ range. Maybe 220F, can't recall but a lot of thermostats are 220F now a days so it is technically ok, they are designed to run at those temps. Often around town the Pilot is about 170-190F in the winter without the SVCM and assume the same with it enabled.

When the SVCM is enabled I am locked at 164F but have been wanting to see if I can get readings for the other sensor as well to check that on the fly. Scan Gauge has not yet responded to my email though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I would love to get coolant temp from a source other than ECT 1/2 on a separate gauge.
 

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I'm still puzzled as why so many are so concerned about this?
It's documented that it's made to show the higher temp readings over a certain temperature- so as to give warning.

It's not like Pilots have a tendency to run hot and over heat either.

Then the Tranny temp thing too.- Jesus- if you tow very heavy loads, and/or hilly terrain- get a tranny cooler!

We're all OCD about some things. We all have our quirks.

Tranny temps- even after I have a tranny cooler, and/or engine temps with the SVCM- just isn't one of mine.

Rant over
 
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IMO you do more damage to your engine running it with VCM while debating whether to deactivate than you ever will running the risk of overheating. Sure, I have the VCMuzzler and am debating switching to one of the others just so I know in the absolute worst case scenario that my vehicle is overheating, but I am still not concerned anything would be damaged at 230F.
 
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I’m reasonably sure the G3 Pilot has 180F t-stat, the same as a G2 Ridgeline. Those of us that monitor ECT see a coolant temp range of about 180F-196F, even in triple digit ambient temp, unless you turn HVAC off. A/C off, vehicle not moving, coolant temp will rise to 205F and efans turn on. A/C on, it’s doubtful coolant temp will reach 205F because A/C on turns efans on.
 

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Starting this response with a "to each their own" but my concern may be for different reasons than others. My Pilot now has 93k miles which is a factor for me. Started towing Oct. 2020 at about 80k miles. We have been towing almost twice a month since October but recently got the larger 3800-4000lbs trailer Feb which is up from out 2000lb one we had.

Prior to owning a trailer I still monitored temps since I do dirt trail driving. I remember one trip back from Utah to Vegas on the 15fwy last summer, about 118F ambient my trans hit 218F as well as engine temps over 200F at times. I had my wife and two 5yo boys in the car along with camping gear for 2 nights w/o food since we were returning. That said, when I knew we were buying a trailer I better get the cooler before I even pick up our trailer. I change my fluids at the factory intervals so it is not like I am on old trans fluid or anything.

Generally trans temps are not a concern and now especially with the trans cooler w/o towing. Winter towing a 3800-4000lb trailer have been in the 190-202F peaks but generally in the 170-190F range. Engine temps about the same range. Mind you, that is 46F-65F ambient temps. So yes, summer temps are very much a concern.

Just today though, leaving an easy dirt trail at about 66F ambient the trans peaked at 202F WITH the factory trans cooler, don't know what the engine was at because the S-VCM but was still at 164F so temps under 230F at least. One odd thing is that the adaptive cruise control would not work for a bit, not sure if the sensor was dirty or something else but maybe 2 miles of driving and it started working again, pulled the fuse on the S-VCM once I had a chance to pull over and engine was 186F, just not sure what it was at when the trans was 202F. By then the trans cooled to about 170F. So moments like that, I would like to flip a switch, check engine temp, then resume with enabled s-vcm.

Another reason I watch my engine temp closely is that we do not seem to have an engine oil temp sensor so if my engine is sitting over 210F for long periods of time, I would like to know it as obviously the engine oil would only be higher. If towing, I might drop to 55mph instead of 65mph for example.

Again, to each their own. Just sharing why I personally am so curious about temps.
 

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I use a VCMTuner II and am considering mounting this temp gauge from Trail Tech in a heater hose. Would be able to monitor actual ECT and the other features of the ScanGauge.


FWIW, I believe the owners manual says 62 mph max when towing and 55 mph max when towing a tall sided trailer.

If a vehicle has a properly functioning 220F t-stat, 220F should be the very minimum operating temp. If it has a 180F t-stat, 220F seems a little toast, maybe not all of the cooling system components are functioning properly together.🤷‍♂️
 
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I use a VCMTuner II and am considering mounting this temp gauge from Trail Tech in a heater hose. Would be able to monitor actual ECT and the other features of the ScanGauge.

Man, that kit seems pretty nice and the price isn't bad. I am going to see if there is an easy access hose to put that on. I was thinking about looking into installing an engine oil temp sensor, maybe an engine oil cooler if needed. In my classic I was able to just get a sandwich plate between the oil filter and block but have not looked into it yet. Summer is around the corner though and not sure what to expect while towing.

My wife needs to just understand the Pilot was a band aid of a tow vehicle. We really need a Tundra/Sequoia. Her Ford Escape lease is up early next year and might need to just pull the trigger on a proper tow vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I use a VCMTuner II and am considering mounting this temp gauge from Trail Tech in a heater hose. Would be able to monitor actual ECT and the other features of the ScanGauge.


FWIW, I believe the owners manual says 62 mph max when towing and 55 mph max when towing a tall sided trailer.
That is slick. I was looking at the same thing except for radiator hoses.
 

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Use the heater hose for the sensor......coolant flows thru the heater hoses the moment the motor is started. No, or very little flow thru a radiator hose until t-stat begins to open.
 
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Man, that kit seems pretty nice and the price isn't bad. I am going to see if there is an easy access hose to put that on.........
Determine the correct heater hose I.D. The sending unit comes in various sizes for various hose I.D. Mount the sending unit in the hose that carries engine coolant TO the heater core......NOT to the engine.(y)
 
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