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Are you insinuating that my vehicles are old. 馃ぃ
Not as old as the owner, but I bet it is getting harder these days to get new brake pads for the car you bought from Fred down at the quarry. ;):ROFLMAO:

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Toyota and Hyundai, and some local industrial players, and the gov't. There's already a station in Quebec City, and a couple more are expected to be operational by March, including in Montreal.

If you read French... https://www.journaldemontreal.com/2021/01/18/quebec-injecte-15m-dans-la-filiere-hydrogene

If not... Hydrog猫ne Qu茅bec


And it's one thing to start building a network of stations, but you also have to supply them.



I was a voice crying in the wilderness years before.



Still keeping my Pilot for a good while, though. :)
How long before you'll be able to make a road trip across Canada in your hydrogen-fueled vehicle?
 

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You will experience about a 35% loss of fuel mileage going from no ethanol in the fuel to E85. You will notice some loss of power as well. A few years ago, I drove a motor pool vehicle that we had to fill with E85 when it was available. The Jeep got 16 mpg with regular unleaded and 11 with E85.

The less ethanol the better your mileage and power will be.

Ethanol has less energy available per unit volume than regular unleaded. Less energy density. The more dense the fuel, the more energy available.

By the way, octane is basically a measure of volatility, or how easily it will vaporize or evaporate, not density although the higher octane fuels generally are more dense.
 

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2016 CRV Touring AWD, 2005 Pilot RIP.
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What @jaussiln says. If you look at the EPA MPG numbers the E85 MPG numbers are definitely far worse than "normal" gas...

Never tried E85 but have tried Ethanol free, but not long enough to notice any difference.
 

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How long before you'll be able to make a road trip across Canada in your hydrogen-fueled vehicle?
Maintenance, rustproofing and accident-avoidance willing, by the time my Pilot goes to that Great Service Center in the Sky.
 

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Are you saying you're ready to let go of your cream puff, low mileage, dealer pampered syn-blend/dw-1 2003 Pilot EX? It's possible your Pilot may not qualify as a "clunker" unless the rules have changed.
I'd like to see some photos of this pampered 03. Hopefully those rear subframe mounts are still sound.
 
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Thank heaven. I could tell you some horror stories of what can happen with vehicles that use pressurized flammable gasses. Many years ago our entire fleet were converted to propane for a few years.
I'd rather carry around that pressurized gas than that lithium battery. Those catch fire as well.
 

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OK, I can be convinced that EVs are the near-term future, and hydrogen will remain a niche until another Henry Ford builds a technologically superior and cost-efficient hydrogen car so that BEVs are once again supplanted.

Welp, better keep my Pilot extra well maintained because it may be awhile. :)
 

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<- Imagine if we could harness that energy.

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In any case, if and when any of us do decide to go electric, I hope your electricity rates compare favorably to mine.

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Thank heaven. I could tell you some horror stories of what can happen with vehicles that use pressurized flammable gasses. Many years ago our entire fleet were converted to propane for a few years.
Battery electric vehicles are so much safer.
Alert: All Chevy Bolt Vehicles Recalled for Fire Risk
I'd rather carry around that pressurized gas than that lithium battery. Those catch fire as well.

As for safety, I dunno, six of one, half a dozen of the other? Toyota really seems to want this, they're aware of the safety issue, and what Toyota wants, it often makes happen.

 

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You know this one of my pet peeves so I'll throw in my 10 cents here (2 cents after taxes) - While I am the cheapest SOB you'll ever meet, I never understood the logic of not using premium gas in your car - yes, it's more expensive but not that much more expensive, and the benefits far outweigh the additional cost. The current average cost of gas across the country is $3.27 for regular and $3.89 for premium, so $0.62 more per gallon x avg. 18 gallons refill = $11.16, so for a couple of 6-packs you get a much better running vehicle and the wife appreciates the bit of loss in girth around our middle right.
 

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You know this one of my pet peeves so I'll throw in my 10 cents here (2 cents after taxes) - While I am the cheapest SOB you'll ever meet, I never understood the logic of not using premium gas in your car - yes, it's more expensive but not that much more expensive, and the benefits far outweigh the additional cost. The current average cost of gas across the country is $3.27 for regular and $3.89 for premium, so $0.62 more per gallon x avg. 18 gallons refill = $11.16, so for a couple of 6-packs you get a much better running vehicle and the wife appreciates the bit of loss in girth around our middle right.
If you vehicle was not designed to run on premium, what benefits are you thinking you get?
 

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If you vehicle was not designed to run on premium, what benefits are you thinking you get?
Well, a recent Car & Driver test on a 2019 Honda CR-V did show +7 hp and a bit of better mpg, but I just think it burns a little cleaner resulting in a cleaner engine, but like anything, to each his own right.
 

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You mean this article?


鈥淗onda CR-V
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MARC URBANOCAR AND DRIVER
Even as it's sucking down as much as 18.5 psi of boost, the CR-V's 1.5-liter inline-four isn't interested in 93 octane. Honda asks for 87 octane and makes no claims that raising the fuel octane will lift performance. Based on our testing, premium fuel might as well not exist in the CR-V's world.
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MARC URBANOCAR AND DRIVER
We could see this coming. During a similar Car and Driver test 18 years ago, an Accord powered by a 3.0-liter V-6 made more power and accelerated quicker on regular fuel than on premium. The modern CR-V, with half the displacement but rated at just 10 fewer ponies, makes the same argument: don't waste your money on premium. Switching from 87 octane to 93 yielded a 7-hp gain on the dynamometer, but that advantage was lost in the noise at the track. There, the CR-V's zero-to-60-mph and quarter-mile times both tracked a tenth of a second slower on the expensive stuff. While fuel economy at 75 mph ticked up from 27.3 mpg to 27.6 mpg on premium, that's a 1 percent improvement for a 21 percent higher cost.
Honda built its reputation on a line of unassuming, egalitarian motorcycles in the '60s. Nearly 60 years later, the company's identity is still predicated on the same sensible and modest ethic, right down to the fuel that you put in the tank.鈥

Another good article.

 

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I like this explanation on the use of high octane gasoline! Thanks!

The only guaranteed result of using premium gasoline in an engine designed for regular-grade fuel is that you will spend more money on gas. As far as any tangible benefits to filling up with pricier gasoline, the chances are slim to none.

If your engine runs fine on regular, filling it with premium is unlikely to boost acceleration or fuel economy by more than insignificant amounts. No matter what you鈥檝e heard, premium-grade gasoline won鈥檛 do more to clean deposits from your fuel injectors or other parts of the fuel system because today鈥檚 regular gas contains the same detergent additives.

The main difference with premium is its octane rating 鈥 91 or higher compared with 87 for regular octane. The higher octane gives premium gas greater resistance to early fuel ignition, which can result in potential damage, sometimes accompanied by audible engine knocking or pinging. Higher octane allows engines to have higher compression ratios (for a more energetic explosion), more advanced ignition timing or forced-air induction like turbochargers or superchargers. They perform best when fed premium fuel.

But if the vehicle manufacturer says your engine needs only 87-octane regular, that is what you should use. The higher octane of premium gas won鈥檛 make your car faster; in fact, the opposite is possible because higher-octane fuel technically has less energy than lower-octane fuel. It鈥檚 the fuel鈥檚 ability to be compressed more without pre-igniting that results in more power when used in the appropriate engine. Premium gas is not 鈥渟tronger鈥 gas.

If you burn premium because you think it makes the engine peppier, that is probably psychological: 鈥淚鈥檓 paying more for gasoline, so I must be getting more.鈥 Some motorists claim they get better fuel economy with premium, but some of that could be due to favorable weather conditions (such as warm weather instead of cold) or other factors.

If you use premium fuel because your engine knocks on regular, you are treating the symptom, not the cause. Something else might be causing the knock, such as carbon deposits or hot spots that should be diagnosed and treated by a mechanic.

Premium gas can cost 20 to 60 cents more per gallon depending on where you live. Paying more to pump premium gas into a car designed for regular gas will have a low return on investment.

Cars.com鈥檚 Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com鈥檚 long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don鈥檛 accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com鈥檚 advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.
 

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I'm seeing a lot of gas stations now with the unleaded 88 octane (15% ethanol). It's quite a bit cheaper. Has anyone put this gas in their Pilot? I have a 2004. I've read that any car produced after 2001 can run on it. My questions are, 1) is there an advantage? 2) is there a disadvantage? 3) is there a milage hit that would make up for the cheaper cost? 4) do you get better mileage? 5) Do you notice any change is the way the engine runs, harder or easier starting?

Thanks in advance
Ron
I thought the manufacturer's put that to rest?
 
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