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I have 117,000K on my vehicle. I've never changed transmission, differential, and transfer case fluid. I would like to change the fluids, but i'm hearing because of the mileage, I should leave it alone. Any Advice on this matter?
 

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No, you are fine changing them. It's a myth that if tranny is overdue then it should be left alone. It is never too late to change the ATF and diff fluids. The transfer case oil can probably wait until the car is under the press as there is nothing going there.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I have 117,000K on my vehicle. I've never changed transmission, differential, and transfer case fluid. I would like to change the fluids, but i'm hearing because of the mileage, I should leave it alone. Any Advice on this matter?
thanks!!!
 

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Note that when you drain and fill the tranny fluid that roughly 2/3 of the old fluid remains in there. If you want to change it all out do a 3x drain and fill driving a few miles between each one. Avoid the flush machine.
 

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I did a drain and fill 3x last year because of transmission noise. The previous year before that, I changed only x1 and the noise remained. The noise disappeared after the 3x drain and fill. But this summer, I had a transmission leak from the radiator transmission line so I replaced the radiator. Then just to be sure, I did another drain and fill x3 (4 total including the one the mechanic did when he replaced the radiator). Flush is not recommended because all the gunk that accumulated over the years will only mess up your tranny. Here is an excerpt: "On the contrary, it can block the valves of the engine by forcing chunks of contaminants in these valves, which, in turn, results in you experiencing rough shifting. It also affects the efficiency of the new transmission fluid. At the end of the day, transmission flush is best avoided, as any damage caused due to it, can come heavy on your pocket, with you having to spend a fortune on repairs."--https://wheelzine.com/transmission-flush-good-or-bad
 

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Here is a better explanation:
https://blog.amsoil.com/transmission-pan-drop-vs-flush-which-is-better/

What is a Transmission Flush?
The benefits of a flush are self-evident: all the old, dirty fluid is replaced with fresh, high-quality fluid. (And, as you can see in the image, new transmission fluid is preferable to old fluid). As a result, your transmission should run cooler and receive maximum protection against wear to clutches, gears and bearings. It should also shift consistently and crisply since the new fluid will provide the correct frictional properties (old fluid loses its frictional properties over time).
Not only that, but performing a flush helps clean the transmission. Sludge and other contaminants can accumulate in the fluid due to extreme heat breaking down the fluid. These contaminants circulate throughout the transmission before lodging in the filter. Before the filter can safely capture the contaminants, however, they can lodge in the narrow fluid passages inside the valve body, leading to poor shift quality.
Performing a flush also allows you to use a flush additive to help clean the transmission and more effectively remove accumulated sludge and other contaminants.
Downsides of a Transmission Flush
For one, it’s more expensive. And some people warn against performing a flush on a transmission using old, dirty fluid. The flushing procedure may direct the fluid in the opposite direction of normal flow, which may increase the risk of dislodging debris and causing it to settle somewhere it shouldn’t. Since the way each shop performs a flushing procedure varies, you can’t know for certain.
What is a Transmission Flushing Machine?
A typical flushing machine uses hoses that connect into the transmission cooling lines. It drains the old fluid and holds it inside the machine while replenishing the transmission with new fluid. Unlike a simple pan drop, a flushing machine removes just about all the old fluid, including the fluid inside the torque converter.
Since the procedure uses new fluid to perform the flush, it requires several quarts of new fluid beyond the transmission’s final capacity. Those extra quarts are where most of the added cost lies.
 
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