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This last snowy winter, while in the snow mode, I stopped at an intersection and when I took off all wheels spun and I think the traction control light came on. Weird thing was when I gave it the gas nothing happened.
no response. I think I put the transmission in neutral and finally things seemed to go back to normal.

Any one have any experience with this type of issue?
 

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Check the link below (it's a Ridgeline but same drive modes). Snow mode reduces the amount of throttle you think your giving the truck to start. It also starts in 2nd gear to reduce the torque. If it sees wheel spin it kills your throttle more to try and get traction. Owners manual covers some info and also says to turn off traction control if needed so you can actually give some throttle and spin tires if needed. Many people never do this or even know about it. Next time try mud or sand mode (but know that other safety things are reduced).

Here's How The 2017 Honda Ridgeline's Trick Off-Roading Modes Work

I helped a lady stuck at an intersection (in a Camry) just by pushing the traction off button so she could actually spin the tires some. She was amazed and said she never know what the button was for (she owned the car for at least 5 years). I explained about it and referred her to the manual.

I think Tirerack had on one of their videos about traction control and snow tires. Not positive on the exact number but most traction control systems try to limit slip to like 8-10% and will stop throttle to try and gain grip. Most real winter tires have grip up to like 60-70% slip so even spinning they clear the tread and still have some grip to get you moving (or stopping).

My old Sequoia, driving on highway, if you hit a plowed bump would kill the throttle and take a couple seconds before throttle would respond again. Almost got rear ended a couple times. Only traction shutoff on the Sequoia was to lock the center differential while in AWD (making it old school 4WD and no tight turns or stability control)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Check the link below (it's a Ridgeline but same drive modes). Snow mode reduces the amount of throttle you think your giving the truck to start. It also starts in 2nd gear to reduce the torque. If it sees wheel spin it kills your throttle more to try and get traction. Owners manual covers some info and also says to turn off traction control if needed so you can actually give some throttle and spin tires if needed. Many people never do this or even know about it. Next time try mud or sand mode (but know that other safety things are reduced).

Here's How The 2017 Honda Ridgeline's Trick Off-Roading Modes Work

I helped a lady stuck at an intersection (in a Camry) just by pushing the traction off button so she could actually spin the tires some. She was amazed and said she never know what the button was for (she owned the car for at least 5 years). I explained about it and referred her to the manual.

I think Tirerack had on one of their videos about traction control and snow tires. Not positive on the exact number but most traction control systems try to limit slip to like 8-10% and will stop throttle to try and gain grip. Most real winter tires have grip up to like 60-70% slip so even spinning they clear the tread and still have some grip to get you moving (or stopping).

My old Sequoia, driving on highway, if you hit a plowed bump would kill the throttle and take a couple seconds before throttle would respond again. Almost got rear ended a couple times. Only traction shutoff on the Sequoia was to lock the center differential while in AWD (making it old school 4WD and no tight turns or stability control)
Appreciate your reply.
 

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I don't mean to veer off topic but we don't have snow where I live but it did rain really hard yesterday. This thread inspired me to go out and test the traction limit of our Pilot in a downpour on rain-soaked roads. It wasn't very scientific. I just tried flooring it from a stop a couple times to see what happens.

I never was able to get the wheels to squeal. I never even got a traction light to turn on. The Pilot just took off like the road was dry as a bone. Though not very thrilling, it is comforting to know that wet weather traction is good.

In the interest of full disclosure, our Pilot is AWD and has new tires that are only about 2000 miles old.
 
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