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Discussion Starter #1
Why is there a difference between the tow rating of a FWD Pilot and a 4WD Pilot because when you're towing both vehicles are operating on the FWD mechanics.
 

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How did you come to this conclusion?

I haven't looked carefully at the part numbers but in the past vehicles I've owned there could be suspension differences in AWD vehicles, the fact that as the tongue weight is applied and the front wheels lose traction the rear wheels gain traction and are driven, usually AWD vehicles have more ancillary coolers (trans, power steering, oil, etc.) from the factory, etc.
 

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The Pilot is either 2 wheel drive (FWD), or automatic 4 wheel drive-- the VTM4 system. VTM4 is automatically engaged as needed by a dedicated computer module. The VTM4 system tries to anticipate wheel slip, especially when first starting out, or accelerating. There is a VTM4 button on the dash, but you only need that if you are stuck and want to crawl out of the ditch.

VTM4 is a good thing if you want to tow. The control module automatically shifts more driveline power to the rear wheels as needed.
 

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Thanks for the info. However my Pilot is 4wd and not AWD? Does that make a difference?
The difference there being semantics... Generally (no matter what the manufacturers say their systems are for marketing reasons) I would not consider anything that does not have a low range capability AWD and those that do 4WD.

For instance, my dad's 2011 Yukon XL Denali has AWD since it has no low range capability (GM even properly marketed this) while my 2012 mechanically similar 2012 Silverado had a low range selector which is what I would consider 4WD.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The Pilot is either 2 wheel drive (FWD), or automatic 4 wheel drive-- the VTM4 system. VTM4 is automatically engaged as needed by a dedicated computer module. The VTM4 system tries to anticipate wheel slip, especially when first starting out, or accelerating. There is a VTM4 button on the dash, but you only need that if you are stuck and want to crawl out of the ditch.

VTM4 is a good thing if you want to tow. The control module automatically shifts more driveline power to the rear wheels as needed.
So, if I want to tow I leave the VTM4 button off so the computer does the work. Correct?
 

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Right. The VTM system disengages somewhere around 12-15 MPH IIRC, so it locks things up just for getting un-stuck. I strongly recommend that you spend time with the Owner's Manual, and gain some knowledge about how the AWD, ABS and stability management work together to keep things going in the right direction. VTM is only for the extreme situation, when it doesn't wait for the AWD controller to detect slippage at very low speeds.
 

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Also keep in mind that the 4WD Pilots have transmission and power steering coolers that the FWD Pilots do not. This also increases the towing capacity.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Right. The VTM system disengages somewhere around 12-15 MPH IIRC, so it locks things up just for getting un-stuck. I strongly recommend that you spend time with the Owner's Manual, and gain some knowledge about how the AWD, ABS and stability management work together to keep things going in the right direction. VTM is only for the extreme situation, when it doesn't wait for the AWD controller to detect slippage at very low speeds.
Very good info.....thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Also keep in mind that the 4WD Pilots have transmission and power steering coolers that the FWD Pilots do not. This also increases the towing capacity.
Got it. I knew there had to be mechanical and or suspension differences in order to allow for double the tow rating. Thanks
 
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