Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those of you who have done a timing belt on a Pilot (mine is 2012) when you installed the crank bolt did you tighten it to Honda specs (48 lb. ft. then an additional 60 degrees)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,501 Posts
For those of you who have done a timing belt on a Pilot (mine is 2012) when you installed the crank bolt did you tighten it to Honda specs (48 lb. ft. then an additional 60 degrees)?
Never have.
I give the bolt a couple of turns by hand to get it started, then with full speed use my air impact to drive it on until tight. Never had a problem. Funny thing is when it's time to do the TB job again, it's back tight as it ever.
This is not a recommendation. Just saying that my crankshaft pulley has never come off doing it this way, without checking the torque.
I now have this with the Lisle socket which broke it loose. You figure it's tightening with the same force.
142292
 

·
Registered
2016 EXL AWD Nav with sensing , 2008 Corolla SE
Joined
·
869 Posts
I have always torqued that bolt using a pulley holder that fits in that large hex recess.
I think the torque spec for the J35 engine was 180 ft-lbs if I remember correctly. I would never use an impact gun on a crankshaft bolt as the hammering action can damage the internal rod bearings. I have a long 1/2 drive flex handle that I use to break that nut loose and they can be really tough to loosen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,501 Posts
I would never use an impact gun on a crankshaft bolt as the hammering action can damage the internal rod bearings.
Maybe Honda has a reason for torquing this bolt to this insane degree, but not even a wheel hub nut is torqued to this spec, which I find to be much more critical. The bolt is holding a pulley on that is not being put under stress. IMO it's ridiculous. I've never had rod bearing problems nor have others that I know that use an impact. Is the advice against using an impact on a crankshaft pulley bolt written about somewhere?
 

·
Registered
2016 EXL AWD Nav with sensing , 2008 Corolla SE
Joined
·
869 Posts
Maybe Honda has a reason for torquing this bolt to this insane degree, but not even a wheel hub nut is torqued to this spec, which I find to be much more critical. The bolt is holding a pulley on that is not being put under stress. IMO it's ridiculous. I've never had rod bearing problems nor have others that I know that use an impact. Is the advice against using an impact on a crankshaft pulley bolt written about somewhere?
I agree about the torque being ridiculously high but you definitely don't want that pulley coming loose. I was advised by several engine rebuilders and mechanics years back never to use impact wrenches on engines, specifically crank pulleys as the hammering action can damage bearings when there is no oil pressure. I figure, why take that risk when there are other tools to do the job. I don't even use an impact on my wheel lug nuts. There is lots of info online on many auto forums supporting both sides of this but not enough to persuade me to use an impact.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,477 Posts
I haven't done the belt on the Pilot yet. On other cars, I'm religious about using the torque wrench. If somebody went trough the trouble of specifying the correct torque for me, why not use the tool that will let me achieve that correct torque?

A both that has a torque-plus-angle requirement is intended to have a specific amount of bolt stretch, almost undoubtedly to keep the harmonic balancer (torsional vibration dampener) hub sit securely on the nose of the crank. If it isn't tightened correctly, the torsional vibrations will gall the junction and risk crank and bearing failures.

OK to use the impact gun for removal? Maybe, with the correct holding tool. Else there's risk of hammering some bearings. Worst will be on rods not 90º to the throw axis. If the bearing is missing the pressurized oil film that only happens with the crank spinning, the risk is greater. Big bar and counterhold the crank for removal. Torque wrench for tightening.

I've learned that using the just-right method on tightening things saves a ton of aggravation especially in aluminum assemblies like our engine and other driveline pieces. It's been a few years since I've hooked up the air supply to an impact gun. I confess that I do use the little Makita electric impact once in a while, usually as a nut-runner. Lug nuts, for instance, get loosened part of a turn with a long handle, wheels touching the floor but unloaded. Then raise the car, impact driver spins the nuts off. A couple of the other cars have magnesium or aluminum lug nuts, and get a plastic-lined socket. No impact used on them, ever. Too often the nut and the wheel become one with an impact, notwithstanding the damage to the outside of the nuts.


My too sense...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
I torqued it to the 48lbs (easy enough to hold and torque to that) then marked the bolt and used the impact to get to the correct angle. Call me crazy, but seemed to work just fine.
 

·
Registered
2016 EXL AWD Nav with sensing , 2008 Corolla SE
Joined
·
869 Posts
I torqued it to the 48lbs (easy enough to hold and torque to that) then marked the bolt and used the impact to get to the correct angle. Call me crazy, but seemed to work just fine.
Hopefully you didn't damage anything internally and it would be interesting to hear from some Honda technicians as to how they hold the pulley when torquing it down. I'm willing to bet that they use a pulley holder to stop the crank from turning and use hand tools for the final tightening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,501 Posts
Hopefully you didn't damage anything internally and it would be interesting to hear from some Honda technicians as to how they hold the pulley when torquing it down. I'm willing to bet that they use a pulley holder to stop the crank from turning and use hand tools for the final tightening.
I'm sure they do. With both belts on. The crank barely budged if any. I only give it a second and a half.
 
  • Like
Reactions: briantii

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
Hopefully you didn't damage anything internally and it would be interesting to hear from some Honda technicians as to how they hold the pulley when torquing it down. I'm willing to bet that they use a pulley holder to stop the crank from turning and use hand tools for the final tightening.
I don’t see it hurting anything. Technically the bolt ended up in the same exact spot at the end of the day and the crank didn’t spin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
Air Impact off with lisle socket, impact on with lisle socket. Did the same thing on my pilot twice with no issues. Also did it on my TL with zero issues.
That Lisle socket really is amazing. Worked great for me too.
 

·
Registered
2008 Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
356 Posts
Never have.
I give the bolt a couple of turns by hand to get it started, then with full speed use my air impact to drive it on until tight. Never had a problem. Funny thing is when it's time to do the TB job again, it's back tight as it ever.
This is not a recommendation. Just saying that my crankshaft pulley has never come off doing it this way, without checking the torque.
I now have this with the Leslie socket which broke it loose. You figure it's tightening with the same force.
View attachment 142292
That is the oddest air impact I have ever seen. My air impacts do not have a battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,501 Posts
That is the oddest air impact I have ever seen. My air impacts do not have a battery.
I got both now. The Dewalt is so convenient.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PHM

·
Registered
2008 Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
356 Posts
I have the same electric. It is so convenient.
No need to drag the air hose out.
When I have tough jobs, I use my one inch impact.
Never hurts to have an array of impact guns.
Edit, my neighbour borrowed my one inch gun in the summer.
I think I may visit him when he is done work, I may need it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,501 Posts
When I have tough jobs, I use my one inch impact.
Never hurts to have an array of impact guns.
Crankshaft pulley bolt is nothing for that. 👍
 
  • Like
Reactions: PHM

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,501 Posts
Ok I finally found where it says not to use an impact gun on the crank pulley bolt.
It's in the 3rd gen Honda Service Manual section attached.
Sure nuf.
I'll likely keep using an impact.
 
  • Like
Reactions: briantii

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
Ok I finally found where it says not to use an impact gun on the crank pulley bolt.
It's in the 3rd gen Honda Service Manual section attached.
Yep, I read that just before installing it with an impact. It’s also in the 2nd gen service manual. I suspect the concern is that you can’t be sure it’s torqued correctly and if it comes lose it’s really bad. It also could over tighten it. I came up with a method that ensured the same torque as they called for while using the impact. Torque to 48lbs with a torque wrench, then use the impact ( without the Lisle socket) to get the specific angle required. Seems to have worked well and I didn’t need the crank holder which is the only reason I did it that way - I didn’t have the Honda crank holder handy.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top