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Hi!
I have a 2012 Honda Pilot touring. I have 82K miles and the dealership is telling me I should do my timing belt. They told me to do it at about 70K. I noticed my manual does not say when to change the TB, just to use the Maintenance minder, or 60K if drive in 110 degrees or higher. I am in Orlando area and I don't think we hit that temp, but we are hot most of the year. I addressed with the dealership that my MM is not telling me I need to change my timing belt, but the rep said I have had my car for over 7 years so it is recommended. I can't find where 7 years is recommended either. SO do I trust them? Do I trust my MM? Or just be on safe side and change? The rep did mention that the tensioner goes bad first. If true will that kill my engine like a a bad timing belt? Or if it starts leaking I can just take it in and fix, so no big deal? Or is the tensioner just as important as the Timing belt.
Also have any of you had your MM tell you its time to change the timing belt? at what mileage did it? Did anyone not do it when dealership told you and ended up destroying your engine? Thank you for any and all advice!!
 

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Not sure on the Pilot. I did mine myself on my 2010 Ridgeline. I ask my service people about it at about 105k and they told me since I didn't tow I wouldn't have to worry about it until at least 150k. I did it around 143k I believe. Nothing was leaking and all seemed fine, but I opened it so I did it anyway. I would normally trust the manual, but if you don't listen to service and it breaks you'll kick yourself. See what others here say about it. If you have the money it may be safer to do it. Not sure how you drive or if you tow etc. I think they can go longer than recommended anyway, but better safe than sorry.
 

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Perspective:
For a different collector car in the fleet that has a seven foot long timing belt, the support family's consensus is that seven years is a good practical interval for the belt. It's similar to the "limitation" placed on rubber tire age, where it's tough to find a tire store that will mount or even repair a tire older than seven years. Consider also that the pre-MM cars included the "...or seven years" service interval recommendation. I suspect that the MM doesn't consider that only because it can't see a calendar. There are more than a few discussions in history here about exactly this subject.

Actual belt "life" is determined by a matrix of factors and effects. If there were a way to look at total engine revolutions, times a K factor exponentially related to engine RPM's, with another K factor curve based on belt temperature, it would offer a more accurate estimate of service and replacement life that just looking at miles. Consider also that the service interval includes the life of other components like tensioners, water pump bearings and seals, rollers and idlers, drive sprockets. It also needs to be at the very bottom of the failure-probability bell curve, such that there are virtually no failures if you follow the guidance, no matter what the operating conditions might have been. Perhaps the easiest MM reminder might come after NNN gallons of fuel have been burned, .or. a time limit like seven years, whichever comes first. The MM still can't see a calendar though.

----

Mine is coming up on seven years since first sold, so would deserve a new belt if I were following the older guidance. With less than half the mileage-based belt life showing on the odometer, I'm not quite ready to just pop in a belt and service kit. I have my own metric hammers and screwdrivers and do the service work myself, and could probably get the whole job done easily in an afternoon, working at a learning pace. The parts-kit cost is a tiny fraction of what the German cars run, trying to keep some of this in perspective. Between uses, the cars live in a climate-stable garage (60-70º year round) with no smog and low humidity, I drive it like an old white-haired guy because, well... Average fuel consumption is at about 23 mpg calculated at the pump, so it's leading a pretty easy life as far as engine and belt duty. The belt and kit will be replaced well before 100k, but likely a year or three past seven years. If ever there were a really good time to suggest that "your mileage may vary" this may be one.
 
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I have a 2012 Honda Pilot touring. I have 82K miles and the dealership is telling me I should do my timing belt. The rep did mention that the tensioner goes bad first. If true will that kill my engine like a a bad timing belt? Or if it starts leaking I can just take it in and fix, so no big deal? Or is the tensioner just as important as the Timing belt.
You could argue a tensioner failure can potentially be as bad as a timing belt failure since a slipped belt can also result in valve damage. Typically the fluid leaking out of a failing tensioner should be visible and/or you may notice a squealing sound.
How long are you planning to keep this vehicle and are you willing to possibly spend $1K+ now in preventive maintenance to keep it going for up to another 7-years/105K-miles?
 

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I'll be at the 7 yr mark come January, but will only be at ~70k miles if I keep driving the way I do.

$1000+ for the timing belt job is a tough pill to swallow. The Pilot is a decent car but I'm kinda getting bored of it. If I get the belt done I'm gonna end up being married to the car for longer lol. If there any enticing new car deals in the dead of winter I just may end up jumping ship...
 

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It seems like a no brainer for me. While $1,000 seems like a lot, compared to all the cost and hassle of a new car, or a new engine, it’s nothing. I see it as a necessity and honestly if you were going to sell it, nobody who knows anything about cars will buy it if it hasn’t had the timing belt done anyways.
Completing this service gives you another 4-5 years of life in the car. Of course other things could fail, but that’s just part of car ownership.
 

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Why not do the job yourself ? I did mine with extra stuff done including oil pan oil crank shaft seal for under 500. The full kit online is about 200 ? Could be wrong it's been a while.
 
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Tahoefever --

Can you expand a little on the front crank seal replacement, and share how much time you invested in the whole effort? I have another DD available for the next month, so this may be the right window of opportunity to do the work. If the crank and/or cam seals deserve attention, there's really no better time than with the belt and pump.

TIA!
 
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Tahoefever --

Can you expand a little on the front crank seal replacement, and share how much time you invested in the whole effort? I have another DD available for the next month, so this may be the right window of opportunity to do the work. If the crank and/or cam seals deserve attention, there's really no better time than with the belt and pump.

TIA!
The Front crank shaft seal on mine "06" was located in the same area as the water pump when you are swapping out the pump it's actually right there pull the bugger out.
Now if you have the oil pump seal leaking ..same place BUT deeper in you must remove the oil pan thus removing the exhaust to get access to the seal .. I had a pit to use and it helped out
big time. add about maybe 20 minutes more on what your doing for the Timing belt job for the crank shaft seal... it took me another 2 hours extra since i had to "dig deeper" into the beast to get the oil pump seal.. at that point i purchased an oem gasket since I was not going back in for that stupid thing. The job is a lot easier if you have someone willing to help .. you need an extra pair of hands to hold crap up due to gravity ...

Hope this helps
 

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Thanks!

I have a lift that makes access a whole lot easier, plus a collection of over 11 metric hammers and screwdrivers, so should be OK. Mine is 40-ish kmiles and dry right now, so no need for the oil pump seal I hope. The crank seal is stupid-simple with the drive stuff off, so that may make it onto the project list. No second set of hands though.

It takes a few minutes to pull the whole wheelhouse liner for easy access; I wonder why the yeaux-tooobers don't seem to do that. (scratches head...)
 

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Thanks!

I have a lift that makes access a whole lot easier, plus a collection of over 11 metric hammers and screwdrivers, so should be OK. Mine is 40-ish kmiles and dry right now, so no need for the oil pump seal I hope. The crank seal is stupid-simple with the drive stuff off, so that may make it onto the project list. No second set of hands though.

It takes a few minutes to pull the whole wheelhouse liner for easy access; I wonder why the yeaux-tooobers don't seem to do that. (scratches head...)
damn good question on the wheel housing ....the only real time i needed a second set of hands is when i needed to put the oil pan back and the exhaust . I used the HONDA stuff to seal the pan back on as recommended in the SM ..BUT forewarn you have only 5 minutes to monkey around with it before it sets....if you only got 40k-ish your golden .. mine started to fail at 180 k -ish and i still ran with it for another 20k just kept an eye on the oil levels ..middle of winter is when i found the leak :p
 

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Hi!
I have a 2012 Honda Pilot touring. I have 82K miles and the dealership is telling me I should do my timing belt. They told me to do it at about 70K. I noticed my manual does not say when to change the TB, just to use the Maintenance minder, or 60K if drive in 110 degrees or higher. I am in Orlando area and I don't think we hit that temp, but we are hot most of the year. I addressed with the dealership that my MM is not telling me I need to change my timing belt, but the rep said I have had my car for over 7 years so it is recommended. I can't find where 7 years is recommended either. SO do I trust them? Do I trust my MM? Or just be on safe side and change? The rep did mention that the tensioner goes bad first. If true will that kill my engine like a a bad timing belt? Or if it starts leaking I can just take it in and fix, so no big deal? Or is the tensioner just as important as the Timing belt.
Also have any of you had your MM tell you its time to change the timing belt? at what mileage did it? Did anyone not do it when dealership told you and ended up destroying your engine? Thank you for any and all advice!!
I have a '12 Pilot touring that was new in February 2012. I bought it as a CPO in October 2012. I just had the dealer do the 105K service (timing belt, water pump, tensioner, plugs, and so on) last week. We were right at 105k when I made the appointment, at 106K when it was done.

I'm across the state from you above Tampa. Dealer never suggested doing it sooner.
 
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....if you only got 40k-ish your golden .. mine started to fail at 180 k -ish and i still ran with it for another 20k just kept an eye on the oil levels ..middle of winter is when i found the leak :p
At the rate I'm piling the miles on the Pilot (~4k/yr the last few), 180k-ish oil seal life expectancy might just barely exceed mine. Maybe get it at around 100k, when I'm doing my third or fourth age-based belt replacement. ;)
 
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2012. Had mine done at 105. It was still in good shape. I changed the plugs myself at the same time and they looked brand new. I went ahead and replaced them, but it appears they would have lasted 100 more. Iridium plugs rock.
 

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The dealer CSR is probably trying to make up for a loss on the last job. My mechanic has said he has never seen a timing belt issue under 105000 mile manufacture rec. Best to do the plugs and water pump then too.
 

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Perspective:
For a different collector car in the fleet that has a seven foot long timing belt, the support family's consensus is that seven years is a good practical interval for the belt. It's similar to the "limitation" placed on rubber tire age, where it's tough to find a tire store that will mount or even repair a tire older than seven years. Consider also that the pre-MM cars included the "...or seven years" service interval recommendation. I suspect that the MM doesn't consider that only because it can't see a calendar. There are more than a few discussions in history here about exactly this subject.
You hint at frequently but don't generally give away what the others in the fleet are... This is fun, I'm gonna guess Testarossa, those flat 12's must have a long timing belt since they require the rear suspension and the engine to be removed to service it... Only reason I know is I've helped my wife's uncle with his. You should spill the beans on what exactly the fleet is... I like knowing what cool cars people have so I can be suitably jealous and enthralled.

On topic: knowing the 7 years, 105k is quite conservative and since our vehicle is not subjected to extreme conditions or usage, I will be replacing ours at whichever comes firts. Being a '15 with 55k on it, I'm going to guess it will end up being the 7 years (sold in 2014 so 2021 is the year). Maintenance minder is great for people who can't or don't care to remember their service intervals. I am the opposite so the maintenance minder for me serves as an oil change reminder and everything else I do is either mileage based (most fluids) or time based (filters/blades once a year, etc.).
 

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The TR cams appear to be belt driven but with separate belts. My seven-foot timing belt car is a performance and period contemporary to the TR. In fact, more than a casual bit faster than the TR in the real world, based on personal experience. ;)
 

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The TR cams appear to be belt driven but with separate belts. My seven-foot timing belt car is a performance and period contemporary to the TR. In fact, more than a casual bit faster than the TR in the real world, based on personal experience. ;)
Faster than a TR? Gotta be Diablo... pre VT? Unless you are hiding a McLaren F1 on us! Or a 959? I can't see any 911, 928, Esprit, Aston Martin, Maserati, etc. of that vintage being faster. I'd guess NSX but on paper it's down almost 100 hp, I know they were shockingly quick but more for the 348 than a TR... I'd guess ZR1 or even early Viper but IDK if the LT5 got belts in its DOHC mod or if the Dodge V10 had belts instead of chains...
 

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I would go with what the manufacturer recommends. They designed the engine after all, and know best.
I replaced the TB on our 2007 Pilot, last year, at 103K miles. The old belt was in a great shape. The only failing part was the belt tensioner - having a small leak.
 

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Hi!
I have a 2012 Honda Pilot touring. I have 82K miles and the dealership is telling me I should do my timing belt. They told me to do it at about 70K. I noticed my manual does not say when to change the TB, just to use the Maintenance minder, or 60K if drive in 110 degrees or higher. I am in Orlando area and I don't think we hit that temp, but we are hot most of the year. I addressed with the dealership that my MM is not telling me I need to change my timing belt, but the rep said I have had my car for over 7 years so it is recommended. I can't find where 7 years is recommended either. SO do I trust them? Do I trust my MM? Or just be on safe side and change? The rep did mention that the tensioner goes bad first. If true will that kill my engine like a a bad timing belt? Or if it starts leaking I can just take it in and fix, so no big deal? Or is the tensioner just as important as the Timing belt.
Also have any of you had your MM tell you its time to change the timing belt? at what mileage did it? Did anyone not do it when dealership told you and ended up destroying your engine? Thank you for any and all advice!!
Hi, Just 2 weeks ago I heard strange noise inside my engine, a 2010 Honda Pilot @ 95k and was worried, so I went to different mechanics I know and ask them their opinion about the noise, it's like going to a different doctor asking for second opinion. Most of them recommend to change the TB and all it's component, so I decided to post through for the replacement of the TB and after 5 hrs. and $982.00, the noise disappear and my problem as well.
 
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