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Is there a plan to rotate all 5 tires on the Pilot? The 5th matched full-size spare is a good idea but tends to become an unused and aged tire after 5-7 years. Putting the 5th matched full-size spare tire into the tire rotation could increase the overall tire tread life by 25%. In the jeep forums there is usually a debate on potential drive train damage from running one matched full-size spare with the other three worn tires.
That is the plan - since all 5 tires are new, I'll begin the "5-tire AWD rotation pattern" regime every few thousand miles.
 

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I'd not because it can't be mixed in without changing tire rotation direction. I only rotate front to back for that reason.
It's a spare. Mount an Otani on it. 😁
20 years late bud. Keeping tire direction has not mattered for years. True at one time this was true.
Unless of course you run directional tires.
 

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20 years late bud. Keeping tire direction has not mattered for years. True at one time this was true.
Unless of course you run directional tires.
Yep, with non-directional tires you can rotate freely.
 

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20 years late bud. Keeping tire direction has not mattered for years. True at one time this was true.
Unless of course you run directional tires.
So stretching belts in a tire one direction at 75mph and then flipping them around the other way is ok? Since when? Who says it's ok?
Yes, My High Performance Sumitomo HTR AS P02s are directional :p
138598
 

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So stretching belts in a tire one direction at 75mph and then flipping them around the other way is ok? Since when? Who says it's ok?
Yes, My High Performance Sumitomo HTR AS P02s are directional :p
View attachment 138598
:cool:
It has been industry standard for many years that rotation does not effect the performance of the tires.
Changing direction does not cause belt separation in this day and age. And NO this tire is not directional, it is Asymmetrical. I was in passenger, Commercial tire service for over 30 years, so I do know a thing or two. How long were you in the tire field for, you seem to have a wealth of knowledge.
 

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:cool:
It has been industry standard for many years that rotation does not effect the performance of the tires.
Changing direction does not cause belt separation in this day and age. And NO this tire is not directional, it is Asymmetrical. I was in passenger, Commercial tire service for over 30 years, so I do know a thing or two. How long were you in the tire field for, you seem to have a wealth of knowledge.
What I do know is the Sumitomo HTR AS P02 tire needed to be put on my rims a certain direction. It's marked on the side of the tire. In my book, that's a directional tire. My tires on all 9 of my vehicles will only ever roll one direction. I will forever believe it improves your chances of not having blowouts. Rotating them every other oil change has kept me buying 4 tires at a time. Never 2. I pride myself in avoiding professional tire salesmen.
Thank you Tire Rack, Simple Tire, Tire Easy and Amazon .com .
 

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What I do know is the Sumitomo HTR AS P02 tire needed to be put on my rims a certain direction. It's marked on the side of the tire. In my book, that's a directional tire. My tires on all 9 of my vehicles will only ever roll one direction. I will forever believe it improves your chances of not having blowouts. Rotating them every other oil change has kept me buying 4 tires at a time. Never 2. I pride myself in avoiding professional tire salesmen.
Thank you Tire Rack, Simple Tire, Tire Easy and Amazon .com .
Just to put this out, in no way am I starting a pissing contest. I hope you do not think I am.
It is your ride so if that is how you like it done, more power to you. I was just clarifying myths that you are spreading.
Blowouts are normally caused by very low inflation, the tire heats up then when it gets so hot it just disintegrates.
Tread separation is normally caused by rock drilling or improper repair, where as the steel belts start to rust then break apart. Normally felt at slow speeds, then not as noticeable as speed increases. And Hell no, I was never a salesman.
I did road service for commercial trucks, and if I was slow I would help the passenger boys out. :D
 

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On a lighter note, this is a picture of my Son showing off with a backhoe tire. Probably around 16 years ago.
He always enjoyed coming on service calls with me. Then he became a teenager and, well you know girls were more important. lol
 

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Just to put this out, in no way am I starting a pissing contest. I hope you do not think I am.
It is your ride so if that is how you like it done, more power to you. I was just clarifying myths that you are spreading.
Blowouts are normally caused by very low inflation, the tire heats up then when it gets so hot it just disintegrates.
Tread separation is normally caused by rock drilling or improper repair, where as the steel belts start to rust then break apart. Normally felt at slow speeds, then not as noticeable as speed increases. And Hell no, I was never a salesman.
I did road service for commercial trucks, and if I was slow I would help the passenger boys out. :D
Yes, I know about low tire pressure. Even more so about these light weight touring tires that come as OE that Honda wants you to inflate to 32psi on a 4200lb curb weight vehicle. The tire is incapable of holding a 60mph rated turn/curve, much less a 70mph one. My 37 years experience has been not only keeping my own work van trouble free, logging 50k miles a year, but as manager and business owner of commercial vehicles, you have to know a thing or 2 about tires, especially what not to buy. Glad you were not a store front tire salesmen. Lol
 

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What I do know is the Sumitomo HTR AS P02 tire needed to be put on my rims a certain direction. It's marked on the side of the tire. In my book, that's a directional tire.
That Sumitomo tire has an asymmetrical tread pattern, but not a directional tread pattern.
The tire is marked on the sidewalls with either "inside" or "outside".
All four tires get mounted the same way, and they can be run in either direction and/or cross-rotated.





Conversely, many winter tires have a directional tread pattern. and the sidewall is marked with the word "rotation" and an arrow that should point forward when it is at the top of the tire.
Tires for the left side of the vehicle get mounted one way and vice-versa for the right side, and they cannot be cross-rotated without dismounting and remounting the tires.


 

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That Sumitomo tire has an asymmetrical tread pattern, but not a directional tread pattern.
The tire is marked on the sidewalls with either "inside" or "outside".
All four tires get mounted the same way, and they can be run in either direction and/or cross-rotated.





Conversely, many winter tires have a directional tread pattern. and the sidewall is marked with the word "rotation" and an arrow that should point forward when it is at the top of the tire.
Tires for the left side of the vehicle get mounted one way and vice-versa for the right side, and they cannot be cross-rotated without dismounting and remounting the tires.


Yes, I understand.
As I explained above, the tire says which way to mount it, regardless which way it can roll. Since the Sumitomo HTR AS P02 has offset lines, it would look odd if you did a criss-cross rotation. It a non-issue for me since any tire I own will only ever be rotated front to back.
 

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That Sumitomo tire has an asymmetrical tread pattern, but not a directional tread pattern.
The tire is marked on the sidewalls with either "inside" or "outside".
All four tires get mounted the same way, and they can be run in either direction and/or cross-rotated.





Conversely, many winter tires have a directional tread pattern. and the sidewall is marked with the word "rotation" and an arrow that should point forward when it is at the top of the tire.
Tires for the left side of the vehicle get mounted one way and vice-versa for the right side, and they cannot be cross-rotated without dismounting and remounting the tires.


Yes, you understand how it works.
People who come on forums and ramble on about myths, that are their idea only, kind of defeat the idea of a
forum. Instead of saying this is how it is, just say this is my opinion and have no real knowledge on the subject.
Of course we are allowed our opinions, just dont spew them off as fact.
 

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Yes, you understand how it works.
People who come on forums and ramble on about myths, that are their idea only, kind of defeat the idea of a
forum. Instead of saying this is how it is, just say this is my opinion and have no real knowledge on the subject.
Of course we are allowed our opinions, just dont spew them off as fact.
Yeah, a lot of that goes on here. Don't be gullible. You might end up like me on the side of the road, unable to change your own tire because the tire shop guy with all the experience, smeared your lugs with his high powered impact wrench using a SAE socket instead of metric.
 

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Yes, you understand how it works.
People who come on forums and ramble on about myths, that are their idea only, kind of defeat the idea of a
forum. Instead of saying this is how it is, just say this is my opinion and have no real knowledge on the subject.
Of course we are allowed our opinions, just dont spew them off as fact.
You might find the following two threads from this forum to be amusing.
Start with the linked post and read through the subsequent exchange of replies.
It takes a concerted effort to convince a few people that certain information, which they believe to be correct, is indeed erroneous. Some have been previously misinformed, while others were simply uninformed.

Tire pressure for long trip

All-Terrain Tires?
 

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You might find the following two threads from this forum to be amusing.
Start with the linked post and read through the subsequent exchange of replies.
It takes a concerted effort to convince a few people that certain information, which they believe to be correct, is indeed erroneous. Some have been previously misinformed, while others were simply uninformed.

Tire pressure for long trip

All-Terrain Tires?
Just checked those two links and you got @Rocky ZZZZZZ ...LOL

There is good info in the links and you have outlasted all of them :unsure:
 

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There is good info in the links and you have outlasted all of them :unsure:
What I find curious is those who are adamant in their (incorrect) position demand proof that they're wrong, while providing no proof whatsoever to support their (incorrect) position.

It's a challenge to provide the correct information to those who say "I feel I'm right" or "we believe so strongly on something". It must kill them to make statements such as "you do have a valid point" and "I find this tough to swallow, but for now its impossible to refute."

Sometimes, I wonder if it's really worth it trying to outlast them.
But, if it keeps even a few drivers from running on overloaded/under-inflated tires, then maybe it's worth it.
 
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