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Discussion Starter #1
This discussion comes up at times with family and work associates who drive our vehicles and it usually ends in a disagreement. I just can't come to grips with Honda recommending a 32 psi (cold) for my 2017 EX-L Pilot (18in rims), a vehicle that weighs 4200lbs. I can't stand the squishy bogged down feeling I get at this setting. Not to mention the need to slow down to 60 in a 70 mph curve because your drifting and your sidewalls are on the pavement. I'm currently running a Sumitomo tire that can be inflated to a Max of 51 psi and I run at 44 psi hot. I'm not an engineer, but 32 psi cold will put a loaded Pilot in the wall.
 

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For "normal", unladen driving I usually do the chalk test. That's how you know when the tire is at its happiest pressure on a given vehicle. And it may be different for the front and rear. It's almost always different than what the manufacturer recommends.

For towing, if inflation charts are posted online I use them, otherwise I'll air up to a couple pounds shy of max. You can always call your tire manufacturer to determine what pressure for what you are towing.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
For "normal", unladen driving I usually do the chalk test. That's how you know when the tire is at its happiest pressure on a given vehicle. And it may be different for the front and rear. It's almost always different than what the manufacturer recommends.

For towing, if inflation charts are posted online I use them, otherwise I'll air up to a couple pounds shy of max. You can always call your tire manufacturer to determine what pressure for what you are towing.
I guess my point is, I fear for anyone driving a 4200lb vehicle (loaded or not) at 70+ mph with 32psi in their tires.
 

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YMMV but I would expect some unusual tire wear on the Pilot when running 44 psi as well some harsh ride complaints from the back seat drivers lol
 

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Discussion Starter #5
YMMV but I would expect some unusual tire wear on the Pilot when running 44 psi as well some harsh ride complaints from the back seat drivers lol
No one has complained (40 cold). The Sumitomo HTR A/S PO2 does have a stiffer sidewall than the OEM Bridgestones I took off. They give me a much safer feeling when corning at 70+ mph.
 

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There is a LOT of engineering that goes into the recommended pressure on the door tag. It is not a WAG, but your pressure is a WAG.

Use the door tag, unless you have a chalk test.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
There is a LOT of engineering that goes into the recommended pressure on the door tag.
Shouldn't have to slow to 60 in a 70mph curve to feel safe. Something is not right in the so called "engineering." It's a 4200lb vehicle. This is my argument. Am I the only one complaining? I'm beating it with my current set up.
 

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I'll just reiterate that you need to do a chalk test to confirm you are at the appropriate pressure.

The manufacturer spent time determining the correct tire pressure with the OEM ties. You have clearly replaced them, possibly with a higher load range tire. There are too many variables at play here for me to confirm your 40 PSI cold is appropriate, you either need to consult Sumitomo or do a chalk test.
 

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Shouldn't have to slow to 60 in a 70mph curve to feel safe. Something is not right in the so called "engineering." It's a 4200lb vehicle. This is my argument. Am I the only one complaining? I beating it with my current set up.
Without being in your vehicle we can't validate your seat of the pants feeling. I agree the factory tires on most 3 row crossovers are going to lean in the "comfortable ride" direction which means more sidewalk flex and poor characteristics during hard cornering.
 

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the factory tires on most 3 row crossovers are going to lean in the "comfortable ride" direction which means more sidewalk flex and poor characteristics during hard cornering.
When I "upgrade" to more aggressive AT tires on my Pilot I expect to lose some of the comfort ride and cornering speed while gaining more durability + traction during off-pavement encounters.
 

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What do the largest online and local tire retailers say?


What about the largest tire manufacturers?


Compare the measured psi to the psi found on the sticker inside the driver’s door of your vehicle or in owner’s manual. DO NOT compare to the psi on your tire’s sidewall.

Look on the driver’s side door jamb or your owner’s manual to find the recommended cold tire PSI for your front and rear tires.

Goodyear recommends that tires be inflated to the vehicle manufacturer's recommendations as found on the Vehicle Tire Information Door Placard or the Vehicle's owner's manual. The placard can be located on the door edge, doorpost, glove box, or fuel door. The recommended PSI should not be confused with the maximum cold inflation pressure that the tire is rated to hold, which is found on the sidewall.

So every tire dealer, retailer, distributor, AND manufacturer ALL agree that you should use the pressure rating on the door placard.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
What do the largest online and local tire retailers say?


What about the largest tire manufacturers?











So every tire dealer, retailer, distributor, AND manufacturer ALL agree that you should use the pressure rating on the door placard.
You can repeat it 10 times. My Bridgestones were rolling over in the corners with 35psi, much less 32psi.
 

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This discussion comes up at times with family and work associates who drive our vehicles and it usually ends in a disagreement. I just can't come to grips with Honda recommending a 32 psi (cold) for my 2017 EX-L Pilot (18in rims), a vehicle that weighs 4200lbs. I can't stand the squishy bogged down feeling I get at this setting. Not to mention the need to slow down to 60 in a 70 mph curve because your drifting and your sidewalls are on the pavement. I'm currently running a Sumitomo tire that can be inflated to a Max of 51 psi and I run at 44 psi hot. I'm not an engineer, but 32 psi cold will put a loaded Pilot in the wall.
A 245/60R18 tire inflated to 32 psi has a load limit of about 1900 lbs.
So, a set of four tires can handle up to about 7600 lbs.
Go up to 35 psi and the load limit will be about 1980 lbs., or a little over 7900 lbs for a set of four.
Either way, you're still well above the weight of even a fully loaded Pilot.
Note that the load limit does not increase above 35 psi.

If handling is important to you, then try a sport truck type tire such as the Toyo Proxes ST III.
Performance Truck and SUV All Season Tires - Proxes ST III
 

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Discussion Starter #16
A 245/60R18 tire inflated to 32 psi has a load limit of about 1900 lbs.
So, a set of four tires can handle up to about 7600 lbs.
Go up to 35 psi and the load limit will be about 1980 lbs., or a little over 7900 lbs for a set of four.
Either way, you're still well above the weight of even a fully loaded Pilot.
Note that the load limit does not increase above 35 psi.

If handling is important to you, then try a sport truck type tire such as the Toyo Proxes ST III.
Performance Truck and SUV All Season Tires - Proxes ST III
Thank you.
I'm very pleased with my tire purchase. I can actually leave the cruise control on in a 70 mph curve without freaking out. I may try backing down the pressure a little to appease the forum and the engineers. I do like a stiffer sidewall.
 

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My Bridgestones were rolling over in the corners with 35psi, much less 32psi.
Would you rather have the tires roll over or risk having the entire vehicle roll over?

As I've pointed out previously, by increasing the inflation pressure (well) above the recommended pressure in an effort to increase sidewall stiffness and thus boost cornering ability, you can create a situation where there is very little safety margin left between maximum cornering speed and overturning speed. This is a particular risk with heavily loaded high CoG vehicles, such as SUVs, if the stability control system fails to intervene in time.
 

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Would you rather have the tires roll over or risk having the entire vehicle roll over?

As I've pointed out previously, by increasing the inflation pressure (well) above the recommended pressure in an effort to increase sidewall stiffness and thus boost cornering ability, you can create a situation where there is very little safety margin left between maximum cornering speed and overturning speed. This is a particular risk with heavily loaded high CoG vehicles, such as SUVs, if the stability control system fails to intervene in time.
Did the Pilot pass the infamous "Moose Test"?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Would you rather have the tires roll over or risk having the entire vehicle roll over?

As I've pointed out previously, by increasing the inflation pressure (well) above the recommended pressure in an effort to increase sidewall stiffness and thus boost cornering ability, you can create a situation where there is very little safety margin left between maximum cornering speed and overturning speed. This is a particular risk with heavily loaded high CoG vehicles, such as SUVs, if the stability control system fails to intervene in time.
I've got a problem with the quality of OEM tires under performing factory specs. Having the foresight to get off the accelerator in a 70 mph turn can prove difficult for many, even though the vehicle itself is very capable of doing so with the right tire and preasure. Rolling a tire over on the sidwall could prove disastrous in a 70 mph turn. 40 psi is not (well) over inflated for a 51 max psi tire. I have lots of tread on the pavement. A chalk test can prove that, but it can't prove tire stability in a turn.
 

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Perhaps a more performance oriented tire would give you the high-speed stability you seek in the Pilot. I'm not familiar with the Sumitomo HTR tires but it seems like you appreciate the improvement over the the cushy all-season OEM tires.
 
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