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How do you know if any Honda service department actually changes your water pump and timing belt when you take it to them after the first 100,000 miles? Maybe they just hold your Pilot there a day then give it back to you charging you the entire amount for a timing belt/water pump service and doing nothing. My neighbor has a 2011 Pilot 3.5 and it has 135,000 miles on it and she hasn't bothered with the timing belt service.
 

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You would have to remove the timing cover to see if the belt is new.

My dad actually got shafted like this with his (now my) Accord. He asked a popular chain shop to replace his timing belt + water pump. They said they did it and sent him on his merry way. When the job was due again at around 200k miles, our indy mechanic showed us the parts and said they were original. We knew that chain shop would not have used OEM Honda parts. We looked at everything and they still had the factory paint marks and looked quite old. Moral of the story: You won't know unless you remove the timing cover. Ask the shop to give you the old parts back as well.
 

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Tangent: Way back when, I bought a new Honda motorcycle at the local dealer. At the time they insisted that they do the first few services ($$) to maintain the warranty coverage. The list of stuff they were going to do was pretty extensive, stuff like cam chain tensioning, valve adjustment, clutch inspection and adjustment. For grins I put fingernail polish witness marks on some of the fasteners critical to access, out of plain view of course. When I picked it up, none of the witness marks had been disturbed. We Had A Discussion. Service manager made a point of verbally berating the "mechanic" who'd charged the time on it. Then offered a 25% discount on the labor costs, which I declined along with the rest of the bill. They couldn't establish that they had actually changed the engine or gearbox oil. We agreed to disagree. They offered to send the bill to collections. I offered to open a claim and case against them with the state department of consumer affairs. I ended up taking it to another dealer, where i explained what had happened already so it wouldn't happen again. They offered to let me watch the work being done, and all was well in the Honda universe again.

That said, and to the OP's situation, I have negative faith in the abilities of wrench-holders at most chain repair shops. They flat-rate the work and have a huge $$ incentive to under-perform if they can get away with it. At this point I still send wheels to get tires mounted, and do pretty much everything else mechanical except automatic transmission work myself. I know if it's done right, and know who to blame if it isn't. Good News is that the Pilot has needed virtually nothing beyond normal services and cleaning. Recall items were handled by the local dealer rather painlessly, so again all is well in my Honda universe. I use factory-style paint pen marks on critical stuff for the same reasons the factory does -- so I know everything that's been torqued correctly on assembly. More importantly, the stuff that hasn't.

Cynicism: Most owners don't keep a car long enough to find out if PM stuff was done correctly. Less-than-scrupulous repair artists know this and might be willing to play those odds. They guy working at the chain repair place will be three shops gone by the time you might discover something not done.
 

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Tangent: Way back when, I bought a new Honda motorcycle at the local dealer. At the time they insisted that they do the first few services ($$) to maintain the warranty coverage. The list of stuff they were going to do was pretty extensive, stuff like cam chain tensioning, valve adjustment, clutch inspection and adjustment. For grins I put fingernail polish witness marks on some of the fasteners critical to access, out of plain view of course. When I picked it up, none of the witness marks had been disturbed. We Had A Discussion. Service manager made a point of verbally berating the "mechanic" who'd charged the time on it. Then offered a 25% discount on the labor costs, which I declined along with the rest of the bill. They couldn't establish that they had actually changed the engine or gearbox oil. We agreed to disagree. They offered to send the bill to collections. I offered to open a claim and case against them with the state department of consumer affairs. I ended up taking it to another dealer, where i explained what had happened already so it wouldn't happen again. They offered to let me watch the work being done, and all was well in the Honda universe again.

That said, and to the OP's situation, I have negative faith in the abilities of wrench-holders at most chain repair shops. They flat-rate the work and have a huge $$ incentive to under-perform if they can get away with it. At this point I still send wheels to get tires mounted, and do pretty much everything else mechanical except automatic transmission work myself. I know if it's done right, and know who to blame if it isn't. Good News is that the Pilot has needed virtually nothing beyond normal services and cleaning. Recall items were handled by the local dealer rather painlessly, so again all is well in my Honda universe. I use factory-style paint pen marks on critical stuff for the same reasons the factory does -- so I know everything that's been torqued correctly on assembly. More importantly, the stuff that hasn't.

Cynicism: Most owners don't keep a car long enough to find out if PM stuff was done correctly. Less-than-scrupulous repair artists know this and might be willing to play those odds. They guy working at the chain repair place will be three shops gone by the time you might discover something not done.
Yes I've been thinking of putting something like nail polish or even some silicon on the bolts that must be removed but even then they may just argue their way out of it.
 

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Yes I've been thinking of putting something like nail polish or even some silicon on the bolts that must be removed but even then they may just argue their way out of it.
I'm thinking they know a new factory timing belt and water pump will last at least 200,000 miles and are willing to take your money for something they don't do since they don't warrant the job for another 100,000 miles anyway.
 

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Yes I've been thinking of putting something like nail polish or even some silicon on the bolts that must be removed but even then they may just argue their way out of it.
Take pictures of your witness marks before they get the car. This gets tough really, because they will likely remove a few covers to see the condition of some parts before they decide to blow off the replacement. You'd need to go in and mark the water pump bolts for instance, and by then you are pretty well into just doing the work yourself.

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With all the cynicism shared, I do want to point out that I use the work on the cars and toys as a form of therapy. It's way cheaper than spending on couch time with an analyst, plus I can add the $$ saved on all the wrench work. For the Pilot, the actual wrench time has been amazingly small, especially compared with the time that vintage Euro cars seem to soak up for no good reason. Everything on the Pilot so far has fallen under the umbrella of "service", with nothing heavier than removing the fill plug on top of the automatic gearbox. The most single-task wrench time so far has been installing the running boards and the LED interior light bulbs. All the originally delivered bits have been really trouble-free. I'm kinda looking forward to some more serious bonding time with the timing belt and related bits.
 

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Dr bob is really Jay leno in disguise
 
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What do you know about your dealer? You trust them? Yes they love to upcharge and may wanna replace things you don't need, but I think the dealer would actually do the timing belt. I wouldn't trust an indie, but I think for the most part the dealer is doing the work.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Take pictures of your witness marks before they get the car. This gets tough really, because they will likely remove a few covers to see the condition of some parts before they decide to blow off the replacement. You'd need to go in and mark the water pump bolts for instance, and by then you are pretty well into just doing the work yourself.

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With all the cynicism shared, I do want to point out that I use the work on the cars and toys as a form of therapy. It's way cheaper than spending on couch time with an analyst, plus I can add the $$ saved on all the wrench work. For the Pilot, the actual wrench time has been amazingly small, especially compared with the time that vintage Euro cars seem to soak up for no good reason. Everything on the Pilot so far has fallen under the umbrella of "service", with nothing heavier than removing the fill plug on top of the automatic gearbox. The most single-task wrench time so far has been installing the running boards and the LED interior light bulbs. All the originally delivered bits have been really trouble-free. I'm kinda looking forward to some more serious bonding time with the timing belt and related bits.
To remove the timing cover I would have to do nearly the whole job. The next time it needs done I will be doing it but at this point in time I don't have the time.
 

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Dr bob is really Jay leno in disguise
Not! We've been seen at the same places at the same time, and each of us casts our own shadow. Mine is taller and thinner, only really noticeable when it's farther from noon local time. ;)
 

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I'm thinking they know a new factory timing belt and water pump will last at least 200,000 miles and are willing to take your money for something they don't do since they don't warrant the job for another 100,000 miles anyway.
I have a 2013 Pilot I bought used. Wondering about the timing belt, I saw that once you go that deep, the water pump is essentially a must do. I get mailers from a couple of local Honda dealers. One caught my eye last Christmas. They had the timing belt/water pump job priced at a bit over $700. I thought that wasn't too bad. With only 54,000 miles, I delayed getting the job done, but will be on the lookout for this price in the future. That particular dealer was in Cumming, GA.
 
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