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2008 Pilot with 117,000 miles. I bought the Pilot a month ago. Based on asking the previous owner and the Carfax report and that there isn't a sticker, I think it still has the original belt and pump.

I am looking at Timing belt kits on Amazon. They range from $80 to $300+. Unless told otherwise, the sub $100 kits are not worth the risk. What belt kit do you recommend, Gates, AC Delco, Aisin, etc.

I have fair mechanical skills. I have done a lot of front end work, changed plugs and coils, etc. I have basic tools, air tools and a compressor. I watched a video of a women mechanic replacing the belt and pump. It doesn't look too difficult. However, she used a lift and a six foot(?) breaker bar. Over the years, I have started too many jobs only to get stuck with a broken bolt or some other PITA. Any input on the difficulty of the job would be appreciated.

It seems to make sense to change the serpentine belt at the same time. Anything else?

Thanks
 

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Aisin kit, and yes to the breaker bar and the serpentine belt. Good luck and keep us posted.
 

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The pulley bolt is a real bear. You need a pulley holding tool and a strong breaker bar setup. I have sheared off 1/2 inch drive breakers, and now use 3/4 drive with a 5 foot long pipe. I then put my full weight of 200 lbs on the pipe to free it. Do the math, that's 1000 ft-lbs to break the bolt loose. Set up carefully, be safe.
If you have a powerful air tool setup, there is a special heavy socket made for impact guns. Lisle 77080. You need a big compressor and a high torque gun.
 

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That pulley bolt will be your nemesis-Access to it isn't get either. Good luck!
 

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I saw a video of the Lisle socket breaking the bolt loose easily. I do not have a heavy duty compressor. I am thinking about taking the money I would use to pay a mechanic and buying a Milwaukee M18 Fuel Impact Wrench. I hear they are pretty amazing.
 

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I saw a video of the Lisle socket breaking the bolt loose easily. I do not have a heavy duty compressor. I am thinking about taking the money I would use to pay a mechanic and buying a Milwaukee M18 Fuel Impact Wrench. I hear they are pretty amazing.
I would be interested in how the M18 does on the pulley bolt, and I bet everyone else on the forum would be as well.
 

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Read my recent write-up here on TB replacement. Exec summary:
1. Never turn the engine by the bolt - do it with the Honda tool by the pulley only.
2. Remove the passenger engine mount from the chassis.
3. Take the PS pump hose off.
Then it is pretty easy and can be accomplished in one day if you have tools. Plastic rivet puller helps immensely (I did not have it). Careful with threads in Al block!!!
 

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besides loosening the crank bolt, the other issue I had was rear cam alignment, the first time I changed the belt the rear cam was 1 tooth off, it ran fine until cold weather - below 40F I had start issues. Check the alignment carefully. I used the Aisin kit as well.
 

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I saw a video of the Lisle socket breaking the bolt loose easily. I do not have a heavy duty compressor. I am thinking about taking the money I would use to pay a mechanic and buying a Milwaukee M18 Fuel Impact Wrench. I hear they are pretty amazing.
Or you can save the money and buy a 3 1/2' 3/4" drive breaker bar and either 1x 16" extension and 1x 12" extension or 2x 12" extensions.
You only need it to break the bolt. Works wonders on the hub nuts, subframe bolts, LCA bolts etc. For a fraction of cost of M18 which I grant you is an amazing product especially when coupled with the XC5.0 batteries.
 

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I just did this job on my '04 pilot at 198K miles. I got the Lisle tool but it wouldn't take the crank bolt out. I ended up using a breaker bar, at least two half inch extensions or a 20" long extension. Put a jack under the end of the extension opposite the pulley bolt for leverage and used a 3 ft cheater on the breaker tool. pull like a madman and it will come loose.

Mark the belt and pulley teeth before removing and when set in TDC position so you can mark the exact same points on the new belt by lining up old and new when the old is removed, and you know the exact placement on the pulleys.

If you don't have the bolt to release the tensioner tension to remove the tension pulley, you can use a piece of wood from under and up against the tensioner pulley and use a jack on the wood to pin the pulley against the belt and should allow the tensioner and/or pulley to be removed unloaded.

The grenade pin in the AISIN kit is not strong and will likely bend during the pull and won't come out. I used a shank end of a broken small drill bit and set it up where i could get some vice grip on. You don't want any of the drill bit flutes, it'll break there. Even the nails i had would bend under the load.

when installing the new belt wrap it onto the front cam pulley first then the rear cam so that all the slack goes towards the tensioner. You will likely need to maneuver the the cam pulleys slight forward to engage the proper belt tooth then maneuver back to vertical. Do not use a socket for this, only use a 17mm box wrench.

Be aware that at TDC on the rear cam the valve is teetering on the valve spring load, plus if you don't pull the plugs there is compression. Even moving it forward by one belt tooth is going to make it want to spring over to about the 2 o'clock position. This the reason for the wrench and not a socket. If for some reason it does spring to 2 o'clock , it's ok, Nothing got hit. Just use the wrench and rotate the pulley counterclockwise back to position, not forward because you'll feel a valve hit. your not moving pistons at this point, only cam.

No matter if you drain coolant from the radiator or not, there is coolant going to gush from the water pump. put the oil dip stick back in before releasing the water pump so coolant doesn't go into any of your oil. Some hot water squeezed from plastic bottle in the area will help evaporate the coolant and then blow dry it with air before installing the new belt.

Have fun..
 

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I did not have any of these problems. Aisin pin came out easily and instead of goofing around with the bolt or jack I used the advise given here and simply removed the lower bolt of the tensioner, and then loosened the top bolt. The tensioner pivoted and released the tension. Also you are supposed to put the belt onto the crank gear first, then the front cam and lastly the rear cam. My cams did not move at all with this approach. I did not remove the oil dipstick at all.
 

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I've done this job several times, and the Aisin tensioner pin has been a problem every time. Last time I grabbed the pin with a long nose vice grips and pulled it that way. The pin will deform before it will pull out of the tensioner.
 

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I did not have any of these problems. Aisin pin came out easily and instead of goofing around with the bolt or jack I used the advise given here and simply removed the lower bolt of the tensioner, and then loosened the top bolt. The tensioner pivoted and released the tension. Also you are supposed to put the belt onto the crank gear first, then the front cam and lastly the rear cam. My cams did not move at all with this approach. I did not remove the oil dipstick at all.
Yes, the crank bolt first and then go in the direction of the front cam first. I thought about the tensioner bolts and decided i didn't want to load the side of the threads on the bolt taking it off for fear of stripping threads. That was why i unloaded the tension by pinning the pulley to the belt. I took the dipstick out because i wanted it out my way and i put on a new oring.
 
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