Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read the timing belt sticky, and watched Youtube videos on timing belt replacements. l figure if I can resurrect an MG Midget that was unused for 18 years, put a new clutch in it, and rebuild the front suspension, a timing belt shouldn't be too bad. I've got another 20,000 miles to go before I have to worry about it, still debating on whether to farm it out. Then again, I helped my dad pull the engine on an '88 Pontiac 6000 to replace the Iron Duke's infamous plastic camshaft gear that committed hari kari.

I gather the Lisle heavy mass impact socket is the favorite for removing the crank pulley bolt. I won't try the starter bump since my '15 will keep cranking if I don't turn the key off quickly enough. Don't know if my CH air impact wrench will take it off, but I suppose I could dial up the air pressure a bit if it doesn't work. Plan B would probably be use the crank holder (which I'll need anyway to put the bolt on), my longest breaker bar, and possibly heat the bolt with the propane torch to help persuade it.

Is it necessary to replace the idler pulley and tensioner bolts? I know the idler bolt needs some Loctite, but I seem to read mixed opinions on replacing the bolts. I suppose if they're not expensive I'll just get them from the dealer, but I'm curious if dealers usually replace them.

Any idea why the torque specs for the crank bolt changed? Was a fixed number for older model years, but now is a lower number plus an angle. Wouldn't the older torque spec work if I have a calibrated 250 lb-ft torque wrench?

I take it genuine Aisin kits or parts from the dealer are the way to go for the belt, tensioner, and water pump. I'm just nervous about a) getting that crank pulley bolt off, and b) hoping I don't get a defective belt, tensioner, or water pump, or having a catastrophic failure before the next time it's due.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
Don't know if my CH air impact wrench will take it off, but I suppose I could dial up the air pressure a bit if it doesn't work. Plan B would probably be use the crank holder (which I'll need anyway to put the bolt on), my longest breaker bar, and possibly heat the bolt with the propane torch to help persuade it.
The Leslie socket is a great tool. If your crankshaft pulley bolt has never been busted loose, it's likely going to a lot of torque. The jackstand method is doable. It used to be the only way I busted it loose. I learned to use impact grade extensions. You will need a cheater pipe to slip over the breaker bar. The less extensions the better.
Is it necessary to replace the idler pulley and tensioner bolts? I know the idler bolt needs some Loctite, but I seem to read mixed opinions on replacing the bolts. I suppose if they're not expensive I'll just get them from the dealer, but I'm curious if dealers usually replace them.
I don't plan to replace these. I replace if corroded. I live where corrosion is not an issue. Most of the time I reuse.
Any idea why the torque specs for the crank bolt changed? Was a fixed number for older model years, but now is a lower number plus an angle. Wouldn't the older torque spec work if I have a calibrated 250 lb-ft torque wrench?
Your torque wrench is adequate. I've never been one to torque this bolt to specs. Even then, when it's time to do the timing belt again, the bolt is crazy tight again. Some will fret over this torque spec, I never have. The bolt simply can't be over tightened by hand. Stop when it can't turn anymore.
I take it genuine Aisin kits or parts from the dealer are the way to go for the belt, tensioner, and water pump. I'm just nervous about a) getting that crank pulley bolt off, and b) hoping I don't get a defective belt, tensioner, or water pump, or having a catastrophic failure before the next time it's due.
Before you buy your parts, attempt to bust your bolt loose. If you get it broke loose, tighten back knowing you have the means to do it.
I use Aisin kits only. Never had one fail. They always go the distance. Just make sure it's a Genuine Aisin kit. I buy from RockAuto with a 5% discount or buy from the Aisin Store. Sold and shipped by Amazon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
2013 Pilot: The youtube video is helpful. I took off the computer and PS reservoir to give me more room, and I think it made the job easier. The crankshaft bolt was a real challenge!!! I started using the BETOOL 50MM crankshaft holder socket ($14 on Amazon) and a breaker bar with a 7 foot cheater, and another breaker bar on the holder socket...I weigh 180, and couldn't budge it.

So then I tried power tools. I turned up the pressure to 160 on my air compressor, used high flow fittings, etc...No joy. Bought a heavier duty 1/2 inch impact wrench from Harbor Freight (yeah, I know...but I didn't have the coin for a good one!) still no joy. Returned that and bought a corded electric one with 1150 Lb-Ft breakaway advertised - still no joy.

Finally I called my son who's a body tech (hesitated to do that because I'm the one who taught him how to be a mechanic, but as they say, the student has become the master). He came over with his battery powered 1/2 inch Milwaukee M18 with 1400 LBF breakaway, and I couldn't hold the thing steady enough to get the torque, but he crawled inside the wheel well and got a good grip, and the bolt finally came right off. Wow- having the right tool always helps! Other than that darn crankshaft bolt, it was fairly straightforward after that. I did use the 45 LBF + 60 degrees method for re-tightening the crank bolt, since that method is more technically correct, and I had two breaker bars.

Agree on the AISIN kit. Also might as well do the accessory serpentine belt kit while you're in there. My dealer quoted me $1,700 for the timing belt job, and the service writer couldn't tell me if that included the water pump!! I did the timing and accessory belt with new pulleys, and tensioners for under $300. Parts guy at the dealership said they don't replace the timing belt pulley bolt, the only reason it is recommended is because it has locktite on it. I did it anyway - $8 for a bolt!

Bottom line is this - there's always that one bolt that makes the job take twice as long as it should! In this case it is the crankshaft bolt. If you have a way to deal with that, it can be done in your garage for about $300 and 4 to 8 hours. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, I appreciate it. Silly question, what is the jackstand method? I'm guessing you brace the crank holding tool against the jackstand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
Thanks, I appreciate it. Silly question, what is the jackstand method? I'm guessing you brace the crank holding tool against the jackstand.
 
  • Like
Reactions: sparkydave

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
That looks so familiar!! I twisted the extension into a pretzel! I think I weigh less than those guys, so I must have had a longer cheater bar. I'm guessing I twisted the extension close to 90 degrees. Was afraid to use heat because the crankshaft pully is a vibration dampener and has rubber in it. I also wonder if you use heat - does that mean you should not re-use the crankshaft bolt?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
That looks so familiar!! I twisted the extension into a pretzel! I think I weigh less than those guys, so I must have had a longer cheater bar. I'm guessing I twisted the extension close to 90 degrees. Was afraid to use heat because the crankshaft pully is a vibration dampener and has rubber in it. I also wonder if you use heat - does that mean you should not re-use the crankshaft bolt?
I twisted broke some low quality cheap made extensions. When I got black impact grade, it made the difference. Less flexing, the bolt broke loose.
Heat does help. I've reused bolt and pulley after heating. If it starts to glow red, that's way to much heat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I twisted broke some low quality cheap made extensions. When I got black impact grade, it made the difference. Less flexing, the bolt broke loose.
Heat does help. I've reused bolt and pulley after heating. If it starts to glow red, that's way to much heat.
Yup. I replaced the pretzel with an impact extension. They don't twist as much, so they also transmit the impact torque better. When the youtuber said he was going to get an Oxy-Acetylene torch, It raised a red flag that he was going to overheat the next one he tried! The propane torch he used obviously had the right amount of heat in a small enough area as to be controllable. Agree on the red glow..I would worry that he would twist the head off the next one. Then he's got a bigger problem (maybe!)

I was surprised when I got the bolt loosened that the bolt was so clean - the tightness was obviously due to the tightness, not corrosion or dirt. Once broken loose, it was finger loose.

As an aside, the thick washer and fine threads tell a story. The clamping force of a bolted system is determined by the amount of bolt stretch. Here they are putting a lot of clamping force by stretching the bolt a significant amount. This is likely why they now specify a base torque followed by a degrees of rotation - this gives a more reliable bolt loading (stretch). I once worked at an earthmover proving ground, where we had a tractor that was having failures due to some particular bolts loosening...we solved the problem by putting (much) thicker grade 8 washers under the bolt heads. Simple, cheap, effective.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top