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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Watching some youtube videos and reading the FSM, I have a few questions re TB job.


The FSM shows how to use the battery mounting bolt to compress the TB tensioner, while the videos show how they use a generic bolt and it bends. Did anyone use the battery bolt and did it hold up?


And I did not get a pulley shim with the Aisin kit. Does every Pilot need a shim?
 

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I replaced my tensioner with a new one. But, I had to remove and reinstall it when I found I was off one tooth on the rear cam. I used a large c-clamp to compress the tensioner and insert the pin back in.

note: I wore safety glasses during this procedure.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Yes, you compress the tensioner to relieve the pressure before removing the belt in order to avoid skipping a tooth. This is why you have to use a bolt. If you do not, cams might jump if you cut the belt or the engine block threads night get messed up if you remove tensioner bolts.
 

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Loosen/remove one tensioner bolt completely, then loosen the other bolt, and the tensioner will pivot, completely release tension on the belt. Done belts on different make/model cars, and never had to resort any bolt hack suggested by Honda. Always install tensioner last (after belt routed and timed) will make life easier.
 

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It's not really necessary to use the battery bolt method, but if you do, first lube and chase the bolt threads. Battery acid tends to corrode the bolt, and it won't spin in smoothly. Be sure to set all three index marks (crankshaft and both cams) to TDC before you remove the belt. If a cam moves a little after you remove the belt, just reset it. There is a tool for holding the cams, but I have never used it.

One tip that I learned the hard way; after installing the new belt, I turned the engine by hand (clockwise, using a wrench on the crank pulley nut) to check the timing. Then I tried to remove the pulley nut by hand. This reversed tension on the belt, skipped a tooth, and I had to R and R the belt all over. Use an impact gun to undo the crank nut after hand checking the belt timing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Or you could put the pulley on before turning the engine and hold it with the pulley tool.
 

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I did this job on my 07 pilot, and for the life of me, I would not want to go through all the work needed to replace the timing belt and reuse the old tensioner. It can leak and become the trigger component that leads to failure.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Received the Honda pulley tool and the 3/4" drive 17mm socket. Almost ready to start. I do not have access to a lift, so will have to use an extension.

Does anyone know off the top of your head how long of an extension is required to use the "resting the cheater bar on a stand" method? I have a 3/4" drive bar for truck work and a 12" extension, but my gut feeling that I need a longer extension and will have to go buy it.



Out of curiosity I watched this video and noticed that the gal took 1 hour 12 min with all the mistaken methods and explaining. So this is really a 1 hour job if you have a lift and shop tools. How many hours do the shops quote for this?
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Okay, it is done. Lessons learned.

The popular video on Youtube by the lady from 1AAuto has several flaws.

Do not ever rotate your crankshaft by the bolt alone, as you'll have the hardest time undoing it again. The pulley has its own mark and a hole on each side of the mark, about 1" apart. You can approximately time the crankshaft by the Honda tool, remove the pulley, estimate how much more to time by the mark on the gear, and repeat. It only took me once to arrive at the perfect timing.

Do remove the front hose from the PS pump and plug the hole. This makes the whole job so much easier. You would need a shallow 12mm head, a short 1/4" extension and a 1/4" drive sliding bar as a ratchet would not fit, unless you take the next recommended steps.

Remove the PS fluid bottle from its bracket, remove the expansion tank and stow away the PS bottle right behind the left headlight. It sits there perfectly. Remove the expansion tank bracket, ECU, and the ECU bracket.

Do remove the front (left) engine mount completely from the chassis. Doing so opens the access to the engine block extension bolts and prevents you from monkeying with the shallow sockets and special ratchets. Be careful though: Honda, being the completely morally corrupt scumbags they are, placed the high pressure AC line right above the leftmost bolt. They absolutely could not resist the temptation to make the maintenance harder, apparently, and used the AC lines as a magic weapon against the DIY owners throughout the engine bay. Use a shallow 15mm socket and a 1/4 drive extension to minimize the impact to the line.

The "smart" lady from 1AAuto recommends lifting the engine by the oil pan. Uh-oh! No, no! Lift it by the strongest part of the block where engine meets the tranny.

If you have an M6 (metric 6mm) tap, clean up the threads of the plastic cover stubby bolt holes before you removed the old belt and opened up the pump. There will be a tiny bit of aluminum shavings produced and you would wash them away while cleaning up the antifreeze mess. Cleaning up these threads would save you from at least half an hour of cussing as you are totally exhausted at the end of the job and trying to feed these tiny bolts into their invisible threads.

Huge thanks to pilotz and STMech for their tips. I did not use the Honda recommended hack and instead loosened the tensioner top bolt, and then removed the lower bolt. The tensioner rotated clockwise and released the pressure. This is co much easier!
 
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