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Discussion Starter #1
So I had an issue 2 years back we're my 06 pilot with 130,000 miles the transmission slipped and I kept pushing until it overheated and then oil theninjected from the transmission through some emergency exit valve nothing ended up getting fixed then in the car worked fine for two years since and again today I had an issue when it was very hot outside but this time I felt it earlier so it didn't get to the point where I was getting way too hot now I'm scared to continue my drive upstate and I was recommended to do a rebuild since a new transmission would cost between 3 and 4000 which is just about how much the car is worth curious if a rebuild would solve my issue or should I not even bother for all I know the car drives fine right now but still has the chance that when you're driving long distance up a hill and it gets really hot outside that I'm screwed on the side of the road to let it cool down which is not a way to live life so let me know what you think if it's worth a rebuild and if you think it will fix my issue.
 

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Please try to write in sentences. A sentence should convey one thought at a time. Your post is a run-on of several thoughts piled on top of each other.

Regarding your Pilot, I would suggest that you make sure to have the ATF serviced regularly and just drive it. Keep up with the rest of the normal maintenance and just drive it. The cost of a new transmission is hard to justify in a 2006. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
 

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I couldn't agree with you more but the fluid as of now is pretty burnt and everyone tells me that replacing the fluid can do more damage than good I have a quote for a rebuilt transmission about 1,600 for that price if I could get another 60,000 miles out of this car it's worth it in my opinion
 

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I suggest not to fix it! Don't even change the fluid. That dirty fluid (I think) may even be helpful to keep your transmission working (tho unpredictable). It's too far gone to do anything but rebuild or get a new one (not worth it at this point).
 

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If the transmission is working okay right now, why not just clean up the fluid and give it a chance. Don't let a shop do a power flush. If you are a DIY person, then do a simple drain and refill of the transmission. This will change out about 3 and 1/2 quarts. Drive a week and repeat. Then do it again. Use Valvoline Maxlife ATF to save a little money vs Honda fluid.

I would be suspicious of a transmission for $1600. Sounds like a junkyard trans. Or a poorly done rebuild.

Changing fluid should not damage your transmission.
 

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I suggest not to fix it! Don't even change the fluid. That dirty fluid (I think) may even be helpful to keep your transmission working (tho unpredictable). It's too far gone to do anything but rebuild or get a new one (not worth it at this point).
Sorry, I don't buy that line. If it's shifting properly, clean fluid will only help. If it's worn out and slipping, the trans is done anyway. Burnt, dirty fluid full of friction material and steel dust is not a recipe for reliable service . Three drain and fills will cost you less than $100 if you do it yourself. I think that's worth a try. I would be surprised if you can get a good rebuild installed for much less than $4000
 

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Regardless if you get a rebuilt transmission or end up with another vehicle, I think you’ve learned a good lesson that you should treat the transmission with a good degree of care and service it regularly. At the time it initially overheats perform the steps recommended by the manufacturer or trusted transmission shop instead of rolling the dice.

And good punctuation will make your future posts easier to comprehend. :)
 

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"Rolling the dice". That sounds very familiar to me and perhaps, some of us here. Hmm, let's see. Transmission fluids have 3 properties--cooling (heat dissipation provided by lubricants), cleaning and lubrication. These are the reasons why you want to keep up with changing your fluid. Changing it one time only replenish its properties (cooling, cleaning and lubrication). The more often you replace it, the more complete the job will be in restoring its properties. With maintenance (replacement of fluid) being neglected, there will be burning (color of fluid is black--not brown which is still salvageable) or varnishing of the parts--manifested by iron particulates/clutch materials (even iron shavings!) in the drain plug magnet. When this happens, the clutches are only engaging because of the friction provided by the floating particulates (clutch materials). The situation here is dire--damn if you do, damn if you don't!. If you want to "roll the dice", I will go ahead and change the fluid only once--to replenish. Well, it's what we call a compromise! Hopefully, it restore some of the lubricants enough to prevent overheating but not too much to clean (one of the fluid's properties) the gummed up parts and cause clogging that will lead to more slippage. or worse, losing gears!
 

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"Rolling the dice". That sounds very familiar to me and perhaps, some of us here. Hmm, let's see. Transmission fluids have 3 properties--cooling (heat dissipation provided by lubricants), cleaning and lubrication. These are the reasons why you want to keep up with changing your fluid. Changing it one time only replenish its properties (cooling, cleaning and lubrication). The more often you replace it, the more complete the job will be in restoring its properties. With maintenance (replacement of fluid) being neglected, there will be burning (color of fluid is black--not brown which is still salvageable) or varnishing of the parts--manifested by iron particulates/clutch materials (even iron shavings!) in the drain plug magnet. When this happens, the clutches are only engaging because of the friction provided by the floating particulates (clutch materials). The situation here is dire--damn if you do, damn if you don't!. If you want to "roll the dice", I will go ahead and change the fluid only once--to replenish. Well, it's what we call a compromise! Hopefully, it restore some of the lubricants enough to prevent overheating but not too much to clean (one of the fluid's properties) the gummed up parts and cause clogging that will lead to more slippage. or worse, losing gears!
yes there was a member here I won't mention any names but they like to roll the dice by not changing the timing belt until a 150k :) :p
 
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