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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
As part of my work on this new to me 06 pilot, the timing belt kit was on the list. Started reading up and hearing about this bolt, it's my first honda btw. Honestly I was thinking how hard can this thing be? I've worked and repaired my vehicles my whole life. And I have to say, the reputation is well deserved, although mine was probably tougher than some, but I have a feeling many are like this, and some certainly tougher. My 06 has 161,000 miles on it, and has never had the timing belt changed, so it's very likely that bolt has never been removed. And lived in western NY its whole life, we put salt on our roads 6 months a year, not to mention all the snow and slush. And yeah it had rust on it.

I have a 1/2 " Ingersol Rand impact gun that I've had for years, not super powerful, I think like 600 ft lbs, but it usually works fine. I do have a 25 gallon craftsman compressor. Of course that bolt just laughed at me when I tried that alone, or with some penetrating oil.
  • bought the fatty (lysle) 19mm deep impact socket, no joy
  • cranked up my compressor psi to max 125, nope
  • used a little heat (not a whole lot, I know there are seals in there), nothing
  • got the special tool to hold the pulley still, and got out my 1/2 in breaker bars and extensions, with a 5 foot cheater pipe, set this up on a jackstand, nope.
  • got out a 10 foot black iron pipe to use as a cheater pipe, and set up everything tight, then started to put some beans on it. I have never used this pipe before as a cheater pipe, we are in uncharted waters lol.
Put enough effort into it that I started seeing 90 degrees of flex happening on my craftsman breaker bar, extension, etc and got really concerned I was going to break tools I've had for more than 30 years. Plus all the potential energy being stored up in there. So I stopped and regrouped.

Almost bought a 3/4 in impact driver, but that's a pretty big expense for me and still no guarantee it would work. So I opted for buying a 3/4 breaker bar, it's about 40 inches long and weighs 8 lbs alone. Also bought a 15 inch 3/4 extension, and the adapter 3/4 to 1/2 inch. With that and the deep impact socket I could clear the body of the vehicle with a slight angle on it.

Had my 18 year old son help me out, while I watched it. Hooked it up with a 5 foot cheater pipe, it was taking him a lot of effort and I was seeing some flex so we switched to the 10 ft black iron pipe. Luckily it fits over the 3/4 bar. Set it all up, put some mild effort in, not much. Told him to give it a good pull and SNAP! Did not sound like a rifle shot, but it sounded exactly like something metal snapping in half! I was 90% sure something was now broken, extension, adapter, bolt? I was wincing when I looked under there for the damage. Lo and behold nothing in pieces, and when we hooked everything back up, the bar was at a different angle, she broke loose! A few more efforts and out that bolt spun! Hands down the hardest bolt I've ever had to remove.

I love that 3/4 in breaker bar, it's like holding a baseball bat. I even named it, Mr. Cranky.

Had to use it again too, on loosening up the fatty transmission filler bolt. It made a nice snap as well :)

Anyway thought you guys might appreciate it, and maybe help someone in the future.
 

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2005 Pilot EXL- 235,500 Miles
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As part of my work on this new to me 06 pilot, the timing belt kit was on the list. Started reading up and hearing about this bolt, it's my first honda btw. Honestly I was thinking how hard can this thing be? I've worked and repaired my vehicles my whole life. And I have to say, the reputation is well deserved, although mine was probably tougher than some, but I have a feeling many are like this, and some certainly tougher. My 06 has 161,000 miles on it, and has never had the timing belt changed, so it's very likely that bolt has never been removed. And lived in western NY it's whole life, we put salt on our roads 6 months a year, not to mention all the snow and slush. And yeah it had rust on it.

I have a 1/2 Ingersol Rand impact gun that I've had for years, not super powerful, I think like 600 ft lbs, but it usually works fine. I do have a 25 gallon craftsman compressor. Of course that bolt just laughed at me when I tried that alone, or with some penetrating oil.
  • bought the fatty (lysle) 19mm deep impact socket, no joy
  • cranked up my compressor psi to max 125, nope
  • used a little heat (not a whole lot, I know there are seals in there), nothing
  • got the special tool to hold the pulley still, and got out my 1/2 in breaker bars and extensions, with a 5 foot cheater pipe, set this up on a jackstand, nope.
  • got out a 10 foot black iron pipe to use as a cheater pipe, and set up everything tight, then started to put some beans on it. I have never used this pipe before as a cheater pipe, we are in uncharted waters lol.
Put enough effort into it that I started seeing 90 degrees of flex happening on my craftsman breaker bar, extension, etc and got really concerned I was going to break tools I've had for more than 30 years. Plus all the potential energy being stored up in there. So I stopped and regrouped.

Almost bought a 3/4 in impact driver, but that's a pretty big expense for me and still no guarantee it would work. So I opted for buying a 3/4 breaker bar, it's about 40 inches long and weighs 8 lbs alone. Also bought a 15 inch 3/4 extension, and the adapter 3/4 to 1/2 inch. With that and the deep impact socket I could clear the body of the vehicle with a slight angle on it.

Had my 18 year old son help me out, while I watched it. Hooked it up with a 5 foot cheater pipe, it was taking him a lot of effort and I was seeing some flex so we switched to the 10 ft black iron pipe. Luckily it fits over the 3/4 bar. Set it all up, put some mild effort in, not much. Told him to give it a good pull and SNAP! Did not sound like a rifle shot, but it sounded exactly like something metal snapping in half! I was 90% sure something was now broken, extension, adapter, bolt? I was wincing when I looked under there for the damage. Lo and behold nothing in pieces, and when we hooked everything back up, the bar was at a different angle, she broke loose! A few more efforts and out that bolt spun! Hands down the hardest bolt I've ever had to remove.

I love that 3/4 in breaker bar, it's like holding a baseball bat. I even named it, Mr. Cranky.

Had to use it again too, on loosening up the fatty transmission filler bolt. It made a nice snap as well :)

Anyway thought you guys might appreciate it, and maybe help someone in the future.
Awesome write up and Thanks for sharing the adventure!! Glad y’all persevered and with No injuries 👍👍
 

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As part of my work on this new to me 06 pilot, the timing belt kit was on the list. Started reading up and hearing about this bolt, it's my first honda btw. Honestly I was thinking how hard can this thing be? I've worked and repaired my vehicles my whole life. And I have to say, the reputation is well deserved, although mine was probably tougher than some, but I have a feeling many are like this, and some certainly tougher. My 06 has 161,000 miles on it, and has never had the timing belt changed, so it's very likely that bolt has never been removed. And lived in western NY its whole life, we put salt on our roads 6 months a year, not to mention all the snow and slush. And yeah it had rust on it.

I have a 1/2 " Ingersol Rand impact gun that I've had for years, not super powerful, I think like 600 ft lbs, but it usually works fine. I do have a 25 gallon craftsman compressor. Of course that bolt just laughed at me when I tried that alone, or with some penetrating oil.
  • bought the fatty (lysle) 19mm deep impact socket, no joy
  • cranked up my compressor psi to max 125, nope
  • used a little heat (not a whole lot, I know there are seals in there), nothing
  • got the special tool to hold the pulley still, and got out my 1/2 in breaker bars and extensions, with a 5 foot cheater pipe, set this up on a jackstand, nope.
  • got out a 10 foot black iron pipe to use as a cheater pipe, and set up everything tight, then started to put some beans on it. I have never used this pipe before as a cheater pipe, we are in uncharted waters lol.
Put enough effort into it that I started seeing 90 degrees of flex happening on my craftsman breaker bar, extension, etc and got really concerned I was going to break tools I've had for more than 30 years. Plus all the potential energy being stored up in there. So I stopped and regrouped.

Almost bought a 3/4 in impact driver, but that's a pretty big expense for me and still no guarantee it would work. So I opted for buying a 3/4 breaker bar, it's about 40 inches long and weighs 8 lbs alone. Also bought a 15 inch 3/4 extension, and the adapter 3/4 to 1/2 inch. With that and the deep impact socket I could clear the body of the vehicle with a slight angle on it.

Had my 18 year old son help me out, while I watched it. Hooked it up with a 5 foot cheater pipe, it was taking him a lot of effort and I was seeing some flex so we switched to the 10 ft black iron pipe. Luckily it fits over the 3/4 bar. Set it all up, put some mild effort in, not much. Told him to give it a good pull and SNAP! Did not sound like a rifle shot, but it sounded exactly like something metal snapping in half! I was 90% sure something was now broken, extension, adapter, bolt? I was wincing when I looked under there for the damage. Lo and behold nothing in pieces, and when we hooked everything back up, the bar was at a different angle, she broke loose! A few more efforts and out that bolt spun! Hands down the hardest bolt I've ever had to remove.

I love that 3/4 in breaker bar, it's like holding a baseball bat. I even named it, Mr. Cranky.

Had to use it again too, on loosening up the fatty transmission filler bolt. It made a nice snap as well :)

Anyway thought you guys might appreciate it, and maybe help someone in the future.
I used a 3/4" breaker bar, 3/4" extensions, jackstands, and the crankpulley special tool when I did my timing belt on my 2011 Pilot, as well. I think that as long as people apply the torque slowly, their success rate will be excellent. Because I applied torque slowly, there was a groaning sound for a moment, before the "pop!"
 

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As part of my work on this new to me 06 pilot, the timing belt kit was on the list. Started reading up and hearing about this bolt, it's my first honda btw. Honestly I was thinking how hard can this thing be? I've worked and repaired my vehicles my whole life. And I have to say, the reputation is well deserved, although mine was probably tougher than some, but I have a feeling many are like this, and some certainly tougher. My 06 has 161,000 miles on it, and has never had the timing belt changed, so it's very likely that bolt has never been removed. And lived in western NY its whole life, we put salt on our roads 6 months a year, not to mention all the snow and slush. And yeah it had rust on it.

I have a 1/2 " Ingersol Rand impact gun that I've had for years, not super powerful, I think like 600 ft lbs, but it usually works fine. I do have a 25 gallon craftsman compressor. Of course that bolt just laughed at me when I tried that alone, or with some penetrating oil.
  • bought the fatty (lysle) 19mm deep impact socket, no joy
  • cranked up my compressor psi to max 125, nope
  • used a little heat (not a whole lot, I know there are seals in there), nothing
  • got the special tool to hold the pulley still, and got out my 1/2 in breaker bars and extensions, with a 5 foot cheater pipe, set this up on a jackstand, nope.
  • got out a 10 foot black iron pipe to use as a cheater pipe, and set up everything tight, then started to put some beans on it. I have never used this pipe before as a cheater pipe, we are in uncharted waters lol.
Put enough effort into it that I started seeing 90 degrees of flex happening on my craftsman breaker bar, extension, etc and got really concerned I was going to break tools I've had for more than 30 years. Plus all the potential energy being stored up in there. So I stopped and regrouped.

Almost bought a 3/4 in impact driver, but that's a pretty big expense for me and still no guarantee it would work. So I opted for buying a 3/4 breaker bar, it's about 40 inches long and weighs 8 lbs alone. Also bought a 15 inch 3/4 extension, and the adapter 3/4 to 1/2 inch. With that and the deep impact socket I could clear the body of the vehicle with a slight angle on it.

Had my 18 year old son help me out, while I watched it. Hooked it up with a 5 foot cheater pipe, it was taking him a lot of effort and I was seeing some flex so we switched to the 10 ft black iron pipe. Luckily it fits over the 3/4 bar. Set it all up, put some mild effort in, not much. Told him to give it a good pull and SNAP! Did not sound like a rifle shot, but it sounded exactly like something metal snapping in half! I was 90% sure something was now broken, extension, adapter, bolt? I was wincing when I looked under there for the damage. Lo and behold nothing in pieces, and when we hooked everything back up, the bar was at a different angle, she broke loose! A few more efforts and out that bolt spun! Hands down the hardest bolt I've ever had to remove.

I love that 3/4 in breaker bar, it's like holding a baseball bat. I even named it, Mr. Cranky.

Had to use it again too, on loosening up the fatty transmission filler bolt. It made a nice snap as well :)

Anyway thought you guys might appreciate it, and maybe help someone in the future.
LOL!
loved the story and suspense.
Makes you feel like….
Sky Working animal Beak Art Painting
 

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In my older age, I’ve moved on from bustin crankshaft pulley bolts the cool way, Now I just use this…
Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Tool Plant

Dewalt DCF899 with a Lisle 19mm Socket

 
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2005 Pilot EXL- 235,500 Miles
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Ok…. So 2 Questions:
1. @Nail Grease - If people are using 6 foot + cheater pipes and weighing 200# (1200ft•pounds) how is one able to hold an impact gun and not break a wrist or tear an arm off?

2. @Chukmak- That torque multiplier- how does it work? Multiple gears starting with the smaller driving larger and continuing on?
 

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Ok…. So 2 Questions:
1. @Nail Grease - If people are using 6 foot + cheater pipes and weighing 200# (1200ft•pounds) how is one able to hold an impact gun and not break a wrist or tear an arm off?

2. @Chukmak- That torque multiplier- how does it work? Multiple gears starting with the smaller driving larger and continuing on?
They use planetary gears similar to the final drive on an axle.
Green Jaw Art Bicycle part Cryptid
 

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I think this is the first time someone has reported that they used the Lisle socket, and an impact wrench didn't work.

The champ is no longer undefeated.
The Lisle socket is much like a sledgehammer, Can you swing it hard enough to get the desired effect? In the same way, various impacts deliver force in various degrees. Don’t blame the sledgehammer.
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1. @Nail Grease - If people are using 6 foot + cheater pipes and weighing 200# (1200ft•pounds) how is one able to hold an impact gun and not break a wrist or tear an arm off?
You actually must hold the impact gun firmly or all the torque will not be delivered to the bolt. You do feel it some in the wrist. But obviously the force exerted is delivered to the socket. It is recommended to use quick short bursts to break loose the bolt, since the impact delivers the most torque in the first hits.
 

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In my older age, I’ve moved on from bustin crankshaft pulley bolts the cool way, Now I just use this…
View attachment 161324
Dewalt DCF899 with a Lisle 19mm Socket

I’ve got the exact same setup…came off with no trouble. Up to 1200ft-lbs in reverse. Probably the only thing that made it struggle was pressing out the old front wheel bearings. It worked, but definitely pushed the limits on it.

The new DCF900 puts out another 200ft-lbs on top of that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I think this is the first time someone has reported that they used the Lisle socket, and an impact wrench didn't work.

The champ is no longer undefeated.
Oh I don't blame the socket, so I would keep it undefeated. If I had an stronger impact wrench then maybe. Almost ran out and bought a new one, but it was no guarantee, there are plenty of videos showing guys using strong impact guns with no luck. But with a 3/4 breaker bar I was pretty sure it was coming off. Having said that, a new impact gun is on my christmas list :) You know, because I need one/

Other thing is I live in some pretty extreme conditions. We get 100 inches of snow a year, and plenty of salt to go with it. Watch South Main Auto videos to get an idea, he lives about an hour and 1/2 from me. When I work on this pilot I am getting the torch out and heating up every bolt that has any rust on it that I can, because they are so rust locked. Heating up as in cherry red with oxy/acetylene torch. Learned this real quick when I started fixing it. I don't think this thing has seen a single drop of anti-seize it's whole life lol. It's been quite the adventure. Snapped off the tensioner bolt, front bearing c clip was completely rust locked in the wheel hub slot, I might have to refill my tanks when this is done!
 
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