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When driving above 30mph, the steering wheel shakes/vibrates when brakes are applied. Stops when car goes under 30 mph. Has done it since we bought it in 2013 so I thought it was normal.
 

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Replace the front rotors and try to drive in a more relaxed manner going forward. Do not bother machinning them as they would start vibrating again but sooner.
 

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When driving above 30mph, the steering wheel shakes/vibrates when brakes are applied. Stops when car goes under 30 mph. Has done it since we bought it in 2013 so I thought it was normal.
Your compliance bushings are shot. Common problem, happened with us, took forever to track down. Everyone said "It's the brakes! It's the brakes!". No one seems to know about this, but very, very common. Once you have your brakes checked, head for the bushings.
 

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When driving above 30mph, the steering wheel shakes/vibrates when brakes are applied. Stops when car goes under 30 mph. Has done it since we bought it in 2013 so I thought it was normal.
had the same issues, especially when driving downhill and applying brakes- had the rotors turned twice by the dealer (for free) and did not work. The only thing that worked was going to another mechanic and getting entirely different rotors- not OEM rotors because Honda ones are thin crap that warps if you have to apply brakes harder (like on steep inclines where I drive). Changed the rotors for good quality ones 5 years ago- no problems since then, just pads and general maintenance!
 

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Your compliance bushings are shot.
I highly doubt that unless Honda completely Fd up and made them biodegradable in the 2nd gen. My 1st gen is still on the original bushings at 140k miles.
not OEM rotors because Honda ones are thin crap that warps if you have to apply brakes harder
All rotors are the same these days, OEM or aftermarket. They are being pushed to reduce weight and do not cast appropriate size rotor for the vehicle's mass anymore. I ended up buying the cheapest coated rotors from Rock Auto, Centric IIRC, and they've been great for 20k miles while the cost is 1/4 of the OEM. Even if they will warp of which I am sure, I would still come out miles ahead.
 

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I highly doubt that unless Honda completely Fd up and made them biodegradable in the 2nd gen. My 1st gen is still on the original bushings at 140k miles.

All rotors are the same these days, OEM or aftermarket. They are being pushed to reduce weight and do not cast appropriate size rotor for the vehicle's mass anymore. I ended up buying the cheapest coated rotors from Rock Auto, Centric IIRC, and they've been great for 20k miles while the cost is 1/4 of the OEM. Even if they will warp of which I am sure, I would still come out miles ahead.
There is a service bulletin for the generation 2 Pilots giving additional warranty coverage on compliance bushings due to premature fai!ure. Shimmy described is a symptom, and inspection with a small light will quickly reveal if they are bad. The original rotor and pad combination on these cars is also known to be prone to shimmy. To save the cost of new rotors (the original Honda ones are ok to resurface several times) try to avoid continued firm application of the brake pedal after you have stopped. That tends to cause more lax material to adhere to the rotor, causing the tiny high spots on the rotor that are felt as pulsation in the brake pedal. I read that tip here (thanks to Dr bob) and we have had far less instances of shimmy.
 

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I'll have to go dig up the threads that were shared early in our stewardship period that describe the problems and the whole braking-style solution/workaround that RAVL refers to. In a nutshell, the pulsing pedal and vibrations we experienced were due to uneven pad deposits on the rotor. The brakes work by leaving a film of pad material on the rotor, and not by actually have the pad contact the moving rotor directly. We adjusted driving habits some to start braking a little earlier whenever possible, so that the rotors didn't get so hot. As the car rolls to a stop, let up on the pedal pressure so that there's just enough to keep the car from rolling. The last few feet of stopping are really gentle. With less clamping force on the pads, we avoid that transfer of a blob of pad material to hot rotors, and the pulsing is avoided.

To remove existing uneven pad deposits, you'll get to do a couple really hard stops similar to what you'd do to initially bed a set of new pads. In a safe place, do a few full-force almost-stops from highway speed in quick succession. That generates enough heat and friction to scrub off the peaks of he deposits, and place a new even film of pad material on the rotors' friction faces.

Longer term, I look forward to using better pads that are more tolerant of the braking temps that a big bus generates with small rotors. Many will share their pad recommendations here. We are a little over 40k on the car and still have more than half the pad life remaining on the factory brakes, so I don't have a specific recommendation based on personal experience. Meanwhile, a weekend HPDE buddy mentions that he put a set of Porterfield sport pads on his Pilot and it dramatically changed the stopping available. He was using Porterfield race pads on his German sports car so it was an easy choice. I've been happy with Performance Friction pads on my GT car, but unfortunately PF doesn't offer pads for our cars yet. PF is an alternate on more than a few mid-size service trucks and on to mainstream semi tractors, so I have confidence that they'd come up with a great Pilot/Odyssey/Ridgeline pad set if asked correctly ($). In the meanwhile the R4S Porterfields will likely be my next pads.
 

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Compliance bushings were replaced on our 2013 via a recall, and we experienced
the shimmy as well. Don't care to get into the whole rotor warp/no such thing debate.
Replacing the front rotors and pads with Centrics from RockAuto solved the problem for
us. ( I had previously tried the hard braking routine to remove the material buildup idea offered
up....In my particular case that whole effort was a bust).
 

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i just changed the pads and rotors on the the front and my steering wheel shake went away. question for you guys, did you replace the rotors screws? i drilled the little sobs out. did not replace to add lightness.
 

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You do not need them.
 

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The little rotor screws are there to help keep the rotors tight to the hub during services. Once the wheel is tight with the lug nuts the rotor won't move. If by chance the rotor does move away from the hub while doing something benign, like rotating the tires. and a bit of crud falls in the space. the rotor and wheel will no longer be true to the hub. You'll often get some interesting vibrations.

When you mount the rotors to the hubs, you'll want to use a good stiff wire brush first to make sure there's no rust or corrosion on any of the mating surfaces. I put a film of copper-based anti-seize on the hub, at least at the indexing ring area, so there's less chance of corrosion welding the rotor on there. At the same time, the threads and the little tapered seat where each little rotor screw sits gets some anti-seize too.

For those who find those screws stuck in place when you change rotors, the weapon of choice for removal is an "impact driver". It's a handy tool that lets you twist the tool body slightly counterclockwise, then pop it with a hammer. The impact from the hammer drives the screwdriver end into the screw head at the same time it applies a sharp twisting force. The screws come right out. There are places that sell stainless screws for this duty, and sometimes Ace hardware has them. On installation the screws don't need to be grunt-tight, just snug enough to keep them from falling out. All the tension you put on them after seating is tasked with stretching the screw and distorting the threads, so don't bother trying to make them longer by over-tightening.
 

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Copper anti-seize is a secret weapon used by the auto-industry against us, vehicle owners. Copper in the galvanic cell with steel causes the steel to corrode faster. I use zinc-based traditional anti-seize for that reason.
 

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Copper anti-seize is a secret weapon used by the auto-industry against us, vehicle owners. Copper in the galvanic cell with steel causes the steel to corrode faster. I use zinc-based traditional anti-seize for that reason.
Seems like high-stress threaded steel-to-steel often calls for the copper-based product. I've used zinc pretty universally (steel-steel, steel-aluminum) for a long time. Surprisingly it was Porsche who has been calling out copper for extreme pressure areas. Meanwhile... The best anti-seize is the one you use religiously.

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The turbine mechanics have been using a nuclear-grade non-metallic anti-seize on stretched and hydro-torqued nuts that hold the turbine shells and casing pieces together. One can to replace several. Except for the sticker shock stuff, it may soon be my go-to fitz-all solution. Once I get through all the copper and zinc-based stuff that is.
 

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When driving above 30mph, the steering wheel shakes/vibrates when brakes are applied. Stops when car goes under 30 mph. Has done it since we bought it in 2013 so I thought it was normal.
I agree with the comment about not resurfacing the rotors. I resurfaced mine and ended up having the same issue 2 months later. We replaced the rotors and haven’t had a problem since.
 
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