Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Read Only
Joined
·
187 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Many manufacturers vehicles are coming with seal transmissions currently. They are saying they are good for the lifespan of the car. I know all vehicles are treated different and are operated in different climates as well as being treated differently be every owner, so I guess that is why they don't clarify what they consider the lifespan of the vehicle. Many of us here may see 250K or 300K and more when properly taking care of our vehicles.

Question: If a person knows how to properly service a sealed transmission by either draining and measuring the exact amount that drained out and then refilling that amount and repeat say 3 times in a week every 50k miles or draining it and adding a half quart extra and then waiting for the transmission to get up to service temperature and opening the drain hole when that temp is reached and allowing the extra to drain out before resealing it, also repeating 3 times. That should give a fairly good flush.. the previous was not meant to be a detailed description on how to service a sealed transmission!!

Should you trust a sealed transmission for 300k of normal driving? :rolleyes::unsure::oops:

sealed-transmissions-the-comprehensive-guide
 

·
Registered
Banned from wife’s 2005 Pilot LX
Joined
·
4,184 Posts
Personally I think the reasons car manufacturers are using sealed transmissions are:
1) It makes it look more attractive to potential buyers when there is less required maintenance.
2) The manufacturer is in the business of selling new cars. They couldn’t possibly want a vehicle to function for 250k miles. So they make it difficult to check the condition of the fluid.
3) The steps required to drain and fill a sealed transmission are so convoluted the average DIYer might just give up and take it to the dealer to be serviced. More money for the dealership service department. Granted according to the manufacturer this service should never be required unless there is an issue with the transmission.

I am glad my Pilot does not have a sealed transmission. Drain and fills on it are easy. The tranny on my Tacoma is sealed, and I have done a drain and fill twice . . . both times were a pain.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
187 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Personally I think the reasons car manufacturers are using sealed transmissions are:
1) It makes it look more attractive to potential buyers when there is less required maintenance.
2) The manufacturer is in the business of selling new cars. They couldn’t possibly want a vehicle to function for 250k miles. So they make it difficult to check the condition of the fluid.
3) The steps required to drain and fill a sealed transmission are so convoluted the average DIYer might just give up and take it to the dealer to be serviced. More money for the dealership service department. Granted according to the manufacturer this service should never be required unless there is an issue with the transmission.

I am glad my Pilot does not have a sealed transmission. Drain and fills on it are easy. The tranny on my Tacoma is sealed, and I have done a drain and fill twice . . . both times were a pain.
I glad my Pilot does not either! I maintained the transmission fluid and it it shifts fine at over 240K. I only had to change one sensor on the transmission and that was easy.. My other vehicles a Lexus NX 200T and Lexus RX 350 both have sealed transmissions. I'm gonna just change them every 50K, screw what the dealer says.. I don't see how never letting the trans fluid get dirty can harm anything when flushed and refilled to the correct amt. I have four of these ramps and they work great for low profile cars, and make getting under the car for fluid changes a little easier.

Thank for you reply
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top