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I got the S-VCM for my 2012, and went to install it.... I feel dumb, but where is the temp sensor located that the S-VCM plugs onto? I've seen a few YouTube videos with year models different than mine, but looking at my engine, still can't work it out. Thanks.
 

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One of the best mods you can do to a 2nd gen Pilot... I appreciate manufacturers trying to innovate and save money but these systems have caused major repairs at short intervals on these vehicles. Has any manufacturer produced a completely trouble free cylinder deactivation system yet? GM's new AFM can vary 1-8 cylinders and can constantly rotate which cylinders are on and off to try and equalize or minimize the increased wear on the deactivated cylinders, but I think it's too new to say for sure.
 

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For folks who don't want to watch a video to find the correct sensor...

The target sensor is in the coolant manifold. Follow the TOP radiator hose back to the engine. It connects to the coolant manifold, front (towards front of the car) of the two large hoses at the engine. A couple inches to your left (towards the right passenger side of the car) from the hose clamp on that aluminum manifold is the target engine coolant temp sensor. The connector faces up on the top of the sensor, has a release tab that, when depressed, will allow the connector to slide off the sensor. Do Not Pull on the wires.

The space at the sensor is a little cramped for large fingers. I have radio-announcer's hands and still found it a bit tight. I ended up using a long forceps to pinch the little release tab and remove the connector. A long needle-nose pliers might do the same duty, just be gentle so you don't crush the plastic connector. Especially as the cars age, the plastic connectors can get a little brittle from engine heat, so use appropriate caution.

Do this with the engine completely cold, and you'll avoid burned fingers and a possible MIL check-engine light on start-up.
 
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