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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Noticed people keep asking about the NGK Ruthenium. If they should use these.
I got Honda Pilot 2011 and 2012.
Lately i noticed the performance of the 2011 (miles 95K) not like it used to be, Car was sluggish a little.
Checking the milage I noticed It is soon time to replace the spark plugs. I installed the NGK Ruthenium HX 96358 (DFE design) also P/N:LKR7AHX-S.
NOTE: The PSPE type is not compatible with the Pilot.
Right away i noticed a performance improvement, Morning start the same as before, Fuel economy is a little better time will tell. I will update in the future
The main difference is the response of the engine, The throttle is way more responsive feeling the car has more power.
Just to add these are cheaper plugs than the Laser Iridium (NGK 7751)
Thank you all. I hope that help
 

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If the original NGK 7751 last 100k miles or more, I don't see much reason to experiment for $1 per plug savings. It's really amazing how long spark plugs last nowadays. If it weren't for carbon buildup, oil fouling, and detonations damaging the plugs in these engines due to VCM, they'd last 200k or more. But it's always good to hear a positive report.
 
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I've been tempted to buy different plugs other than OE for reasons such as longevity or ones that supposedly improve fuel economy. Never for price because for spark plugs, you get what you pay for. There are some really poorly made plugs out there. I've never had a reason to stray from OE. Maybe if there was a large movement to Ruthenium plugs I'd jump on the train.
ADDED: Not saying you made a bad choice. It certainly seems that you needed new spark plugs by the results.
 
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There was a time when all cars came from factory with dino oil. Now, it's difficult to find a new car not running syn.

There was a time when OE plug electrodes were copper, then they went to platinum, now iridium.

Point is the manufacturers wait for the aftermarket to prove it out before adoption. Just because it's not OE doesn't mean that people should be afraid to try something new and different.
 
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There was a time when all cars came from factory with dino oil. Now, it's difficult to find a new car not running syn.

There was a time when OE plug electrodes were copper, then they went to platinum, now iridium.

Point is the manufacturers wait for the aftermarket to prove it out before adoption. Just because it's not OE doesn't mean that people should be afraid to try something new and different.
Being that these Ruthenium plugs are a NGK product, I wouldn't say I would be afraid. I'm just pessimistic of the need for a change. Yes, prove to me there better. My current mindset is that NGK Laser Iridium plugs are, and not a one has failed me.
 

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There was a time when all cars came from factory with dino oil. Now, it's difficult to find a new car not running syn.

There was a time when OE plug electrodes were copper, then they went to platinum, now iridium.

Point is the manufacturers wait for the aftermarket to prove it out before adoption. Just because it's not OE doesn't mean that people should be afraid to try something new and different.
The flaw in the logic, is that different engine/ignition designs call for different specifics plugs. Just because plug tech advances, does not mean that the new plug tech is good for all engines. When platinum plugs first came out, people started using them in older engines that were not designed for them, and they didn't last long or caused misfire issues immediately. The older Jeep 4.0 inline 6 engines, for example, hated bosch platinum plugs when they first came out, and caused all kinds of misfire issues.

Use what the engine is designed for. If the change is small, then the benefits are likely also small. If the manufacturer changes the plug spec or recommendation, then I'll be sure to change as well, or wait until the masses adopt and recommend something, and prove it out. I have zero interest in being a guinea pig, but some people do and I applaud them.
 
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I currently have 190.000 miles on my 2011 EX-L and have never changed the spark plugs, runs just as good as new and getting better gas mileage than I did with less than 100.000 miles.
 
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I currently have 190.000 miles on my 2011 EX-L and have never changed the spark plugs, runs just as good as new and getting better gas mileage than I did with less than 100.000 miles.
:oops:

Hopefully you don't push the timing belt the same way! ;)

My dad did the same thing on his 2002 Odyssey (non-VCM J35)... first spark plug change was a little over 200,000 miles.... and they came out no problem and looked good.

I am shocked you have been able to do this on a VCM engine, however, since this engine suffers from carbon buildup, ring failure, and subsequent oil fouling on cylinders 1-4. Are you running a VCM disabler?
 

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Of the many high mileage vehicles I've owned over the years, I've only changed spark plugs once. And I was super motivated on that car (my '06 Accord) and adjusted the valves as well. I'm leaning towards the mindset that if I don't have misfires or mileage issues I'm not going to touch what seems to be working.
 

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Of the many high mileage vehicles I've owned over the years, I've only changed spark plugs once. And I was super motivated on that car (my '06 Accord) and adjusted the valves as well. I'm leaning towards the mindset that if I don't have misfires or mileage issues I'm not going to touch what seems to be working.
I like that approach. The only counter would be when I pulled mine on the Pilot at 99k, the insulator on one of them was cracked and missing chunks, and two others showed evidence of cracking (but still intact). You don't really want pieces of ceramic insulator going through your valves.... and changing the cracked ones before they fall apart would be good to do. Now, I believe these fail prematurely because of VCM, and on a non-VCM engine this would be much less of a risk.
 

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I like that approach. The only counter would be when I pulled mine on the Pilot at 99k, the insulator on one of them was cracked and missing chunks, and two others showed evidence of cracking (but still intact). You don't really want pieces of ceramic insulator going through your valves.... and changing the cracked ones before they fall apart would be good to do. Now, I believe these fail prematurely because of VCM, and on a non-VCM engine this would be much less of a risk.
I have no argument for that, it's a very real possibility. There's also the possibility that the dissimilar metals (aluminum heads vs steel threads on spark plugs) can corrode and become a major pain during removal (think Ford Triton engines with the Helicoils as the fix).

What's right? Who's wrong? Where's Waldo? We all do the best we can based on our experience, skill level and available time. If I didn't have 3 kids under 6 I'd be adjusting valves and cleaning throttle bodies and all of that junk because I like wrenching. One day it will come.
 

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:oops:

Hopefully you don't push the timing belt the same way! ;)

My dad did the same thing on his 2002 Odyssey (non-VCM J35)... first spark plug change was a little over 200,000 miles.... and they came out no problem and looked good.

I am shocked you have been able to do this on a VCM engine, however, since this engine suffers from carbon buildup, ring failure, and subsequent oil fouling on cylinders 1-4. Are you running a VCM disabler?
 

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I did get the timing belt replaced at 105.000 and if I don't trade it in for a new Passport, will get it replaced again at 210.000 miles. I did fail to mention that I did have #4 cylinder spark plug and coil pack replaced at 186.000 miles.
 

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Ok!
The price difference got me. And it seems our beloved NGK Laser Iridium plugs have gone up in price (again). If NGK Ruthenium HX is supposedly better, why are they cheaper? The price difference is significant.
134175
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ok!
The price difference got me. And it seems our beloved NGK Laser Iridium plugs have gone up in price (again). If NGK Ruthenium HX is supposedly better, why are they cheaper? The price difference is significant. View attachment 134175
Well, All pricing is supply and demand. I think Ruthenium cheaper due to the fact there is low demand. Since installing these on my Pilot the MPG is 0.8 better and the car acting faster and has better acceleration. You do the math...Is it worth it?
 

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I ordered a set for a Nissan V8 engine for almost a $32 savings. Everything I read lead me to believe I'm getting a better plug longevity wise. ¯\(ツ)
 

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Yeah, tell us about the Ruthies! LOL
Seriously, I'd like to know a review too.
I good review would be you haven't had to pull and look at them yet LOL
 
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Yes, I bought a set for a Nissan NV 5.6L V8 that is specd for NGK Laser Iridium. They have about 40k miles on them. The vehicle is running well. No misfires.
 
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