Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner

21 - 31 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
Sorry, but I wouldn't do this without welding. Self tapping screws? Really? I'd also go with grade 8 bolts, cuz why not?! Sorry, but I don't like your repair. That's just me though.
No offense taken, but did you actually crawl underneath and take a look at what's really involved?

This repair worked for me, and is still working after more than a year. The self tapping screws serve to hold the repair saddle and large plate washer in position, and the half-inch grade 5 through bolt does the real work of pulling everything together. This repair works by sandwiching the the rusted out connection with a plate and saddle, and bolting it all together.

The unit body frame is not very thick. You need to be a very good welder to run a good vertical bead without burning through. I'm not that good. It is also impossible to access the front of the cross member to weld it. And, I didn't see the need to start my Pilot on fire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
This is my first post. I've driven my 2003 Honda Pilot EX for the 10 years, 291,000+ miles (she's a Beast and I really don't want to lose her).

I need some advice on this repair. How is it holding up? This same issue happened about 3 1/2 weeks ago, while I was moving. I now live 38 miles from my work and have been a nervous wreck driving her to and from work like this. I work with some great guys who said they would weld it back together but I can't seem to find the parts needed and came across your post about repairs without welding anything. There's a screenshot below of the original post I found about this repair.

Any more specifics you can give me (so I can forward to the great guys I work with)?
Sabrina, please take another look at the first 3 posts in this thread. I have given good detail on how I did this repair. If you have a question, feel free to send me a message through the forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,105 Posts
I have a feeling this very useful repair thread will become more and more popular as time goes by. (y)

@STMech How about doing the Piloteer community an extra solid and create a standalone downloadable PDF folks can just print out and hand to their favorite welding/body shop?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
No offense taken, but did you actually crawl underneath and take a look at what's really involved?

This repair worked for me, and is still working after more than a year. The self tapping screws serve to hold the repair saddle and large plate washer in position, and the half-inch grade 5 through bolt does the real work of pulling everything together. This repair works by sandwiching the the rusted out connection with a plate and saddle, and bolting it all together.

The unit body frame is not very thick. You need to be a very good welder to run a good vertical bead without burning through. I'm not that good. It is also impossible to access the front of the cross member to weld it. And, I didn't see the need to start my Pilot on fire.
Ok, it's your show lol. I would at least use grade 8 cuz why not. 😄
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
Ok, it's your show lol. I would at least use grade 8 cuz why not. 😄
I ordered the long through bolt from Fastenal. Grade 8 in this length was not readily available. I felt that Grade 5 was adequate. I admit that this is a "shade tree" repair, and time will tell if holds up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
I have a feeling this very useful repair thread will become more and more popular as time goes by. (y)

@STMech How about doing the Piloteer community an extra solid and create a standalone downloadable PDF folks can just print out and hand to their favorite welding/body shop?
If i can figure out how to do that, i will. My computer skills are basic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,105 Posts
If i can figure out how to do that, i will. My computer skills are basic.
Make it in Word, then print to PDF and upload. It'll become a popular download as more and more of these are beginning to show up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Sorry, but I wouldn't do this without welding. Self tapping screws? Really? I'd also go with grade 8 bolts, cuz why not?! Sorry, but I don't like your repair. That's just me though.
Just to add my perspective for the growing number of people looking for an appropriate solution to an ugly problem - the tendency to "do it right" with any job on an old car is something I think about a lot. Often with auto repair, "right" means "as bulletproof as I can make it", or even "good as new". That's often a good idea.

In this case, compromises are probably in order. Consider the most likely big picture:

1. Honda Pilot valued under $5k due to age before it was known that the rear wheels are falling off.
2. Significant structural failure that is economically infeasible to repair "as new".
3. Owner's goal is to squeeze a few years out of the vehicle.
4. Any repair cannot be expected to survive an additional major issue such as rear-end or rear lateral collision.

While the differences between bolt grades, between welding and screwing something down, etc. are all important, under the circumstances I think that the STMech fix is entirely adequate.

Put another way, if my Pilot were to develop this problem, I would choose between doing the cheapest, fastest realistic fix available (ie, the STMech approach, with whatever cost-cutting improvements that might be invented between now and then) vs. selling it for whatever I could get and moving on. For me, trying to make the repair "bulletproof" or "good as new" or even "a little better" is a waste of money and effort that would be better spent on another vehicle.

However, as Slipjohn has already noted, "its your show".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)
Just to add my perspective for the growing number of people looking for an appropriate solution to an ugly problem - the tendency to "do it right" with any job on an old car is something I think about a lot. Often with auto repair, "right" means "as bulletproof as I can make it", or even "good as new". That's often a good idea.

In this case, compromises are probably in order. Consider the most likely big picture:

1. Honda Pilot valued under $5k due to age before it was known that the rear wheels are falling off.
2. Significant structural failure that is economically infeasible to repair "as new".
3. Owner's goal is to squeeze a few years out of the vehicle.
4. Any repair cannot be expected to survive an additional major issue such as rear-end or rear lateral collision.

While the differences between bolt grades, between welding and screwing something down, etc. are all important, under the circumstances I think that the STMech fix is entirely adequate.

Put another way, if my Pilot were to develop this problem, I would choose between doing the cheapest, fastest realistic fix available (ie, the STMech approach, with whatever cost-cutting improvements that might be invented between now and then) vs. selling it for whatever I could get and moving on. For me, trying to make the repair "bulletproof" or "good as new" or even "a little better" is a waste of money and effort that would be better spent on another vehicle.

However, as Slipjohn has already noted, "its your show".
Since this is "my show", I just want to say:
This repair worked for me, and has held up for a year without problems.
It might not work for your Pilot, depending on condition.
If you want to improve on this idea, please do so!
I'm not selling anything, or promising miracles.
Not every rusty Pilot should be repaired. Some probably should go to the junkyard.
Any repair is your choice; when in doubt, choose safety. This may mean junking the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
is the hole for the thru bolt in the u-bracket centered, front to back, or did you pre-install the bracket and used the subframe to locate the hole.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
is the hole for the thru bolt in the u-bracket centered, front to back, or did you pre-install the bracket and used the subframe to locate the hole.
I centered the hole in the repair bracket in the front-to-back direction. Then I jacked up the subframe to the bracket and aligned everything with a 1/2 inch steel pin. I used a couple of wedges in there between bracket and subframe to snug everything, and then ran self tapping bolts from above to set the brackets location.
 
21 - 31 of 31 Posts
Top