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A year ago I changed all four wheels with the brand new brake pads, but I did not surface the rotors. Now I want to replace all original rotors with the brand new ones and reusing the same brake pads that I installed a year ago. Is it a good idea to reuse the existing brake pads with the brand new rotors if the brake pads are still good?
 

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It might be like a second marriage. Parts may be worn in different ways...
 

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You can do it but need to planish the pads till the surface is clean and with no traces
of fretting. You need a strait surface(marble or glass), some sand paper and a
lot of patience... and is a dirty job. And check if the pads are used equally... Up to you.
 

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New pads are required every time you change rotors. Wear patterns on the old pads could be asymmetrical, which you don’t want to transfer to your new and expensive rotors. New pads also are relatively inexpensive compared to the cost of having to prematurely replace rotors damaged by the old pads.
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Another piece of advice: use the best quality of aftermarket rotors you can buy, making sure that they have vent grooves machined into the surfaces to dissipate hot gasses that build up under the pads while braking. This will reduce brake fade during heavy braking, and reduce rotor temperature and mitigate rotor warping. Honda pads are my recommendation.
Note that this (rotors) is the only place where deviating from Honda parts is advisable, as Honda rotors are not available with vent grooves.
 

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I do it all the time. If the rotor surfaces are flat and smooth with no gooving, than it works fine
 

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That website is pure bunk. It does not address distortion in trueness of rotors brought on by heat from normal braking. The truth is that rotors on vehicles produced with an undue preoccupation on bottom line profit are often mechanically inadequate in as far as maintaining trueness (runout) during anything but the slowest speeds of use.
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Today’s vehicles are significantly heavier, while the braking components are aggressively leaned down to minimize unsprung weight. This is especially so with mass-market vehicles which tend to be SUVs, trucks and minivans.
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The solution is not ignorant websites that try to suppress the facts. The solution is to give customers back the option of upsizing their vehicle’s braking package when they buy or lease. Smart customers will choose the “big brake” package that usually necessitates larger wheels to fit the bigger rotors and calipers under. A “big brake” option isn’t glamorous or cheap. Most people aren’t smart enough to know where the “smart money” should be spent to yield multiples in reduced repair costs as the vehicle ages.
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When we, as owners of existing vehicles need to replace rotors, we should explore the options to upgrade. If a better OEM solution is available, that’s the most sensible choice to guarantee the vehicle was engineered with it in mind. The next best alternative is going with an aftermarket rotor upgrade that has surfaces machined with ventilation slots or grooves to dissipate hot gasses that otherwise get trapped under the brake pads. Remember, the premium aftermarket manufacturers have their name on the line, so they are highly motivated to produce the parts that will give them a good name in the customer’s eyes. Avoid the low end and mid-range quality rotors, especially unbranded ones being sold for cash by private sellers.
 

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That website is pure bunk. It does not address distortion in trueness of rotors brought on by heat from normal braking.
Apparently you didn't read through the second paragraph.

Smart customers will choose the “big brake” package that usually necessitates larger wheels to fit the bigger rotors and calipers under.
A "big brake" package may not be compatible with the OEM ABS controller.
https://www.brakes-shop.com/brakepedia/bbk/abs-and-brake-kit-fundamentals
 

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The question is not if you can use new pads on old rotors. It is whether you can use new rotors with old pads.
It works both ways: you look at the old rotors first then you follow what I wrote. The key is whether there are or there are not groves on the rotors.
 

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Apparently you didn't read through the second paragraph.


A "big brake" package may not be compatible with the OEM ABS controller.
https://www.brakes-shop.com/brakepedia/bbk/abs-and-brake-kit-fundamentals
Keep in mind that the ABS SENSORS are positioned to read magnetic pulses from the reluctors on the hubs, not the rotor.
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ABS is governed by continuity of pulse rate. The system modulates the solenoid valves between the locking wheel and the accumulator to restore wheel movement observed as contiguous pulses from the Hall effect sensors at each wheel hub.
 

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Very good article about the brakes. The reality is that a lot of peoples drive
with the left leg on the brake pedal and is the cycle: drive brake drive brake...
never keep a steady speed. See it... live it and the problems start... pads used
to fast, discs full of deposits, overheat, specific smell...
 

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A year ago I changed all four wheels with the brand new brake pads, but I did not surface the rotors. Now I want to replace all original rotors with the brand new ones and reusing the same brake pads that I installed a year ago. Is it a good idea to reuse the existing brake pads with the brand new rotors if the brake pads are still good?
Nope, new rotors need new pads. Worn pads will hot spot the new rotors leading to warping.
 

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I have regularly used a 4" belt sander (pedistal mount type with a flat grinding surface) to resurface old pads. Clean thoroughly. Make sure they are same thickness from fore to aft. Do not breathe the dust. Never had an issue. While it is not the "approved" method if you are working in a shop, it will work fine.
 

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Yeah the Titanic was made with rivets not welds to cut corners and look what happen to them :p
 
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