Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner

1 - 20 of 112 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I seem to remember reading that if your replacing a CV axle, you should replace the other side too. Is this true? What are pros and cons?
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
Joined
·
4,298 Posts
Pros: You won't be doing the same job two weeks later on the other side.

Cons: You have no excuse not to go with the wife when she wants to go shopping.

Unlike shocks or tires which should be replaced at least in pairs, the only thing changing them in pairs does is ensure that they have equal running time, because at some point you will have to change the one you didn't in the first place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,977 Posts
One side is harder than the other. Typically the mysterious boot failure>grease sloshing>clicking triggers replacement. In that scenario I would only change the one that failed as the other might last a few more years. 🤞
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Pros: You won't be doing the same job two weeks later on the other side.

Cons: You have no excuse not to go with the wife when she wants to go shopping.

Unlike shocks or tires which should be replaced at least in pairs, the only thing changing them in pairs does is ensure that they have equal running time, because at some point you will have to change the one you didn't in the first place.
Hmmm,
Your Pro is no big deal to me since I DIY. I'm always working on something.
Your Con is actually a Pro. I don't like to go shopping. Lol
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
Joined
·
4,298 Posts
Hmmm,
Your Pro is no big deal to me since I DIY. I'm always working on something.
Your Con is actually a Pro. I don't like to go shopping. Lol
Me thinks you misunderstood the con. The con to doing them at the same time is not having the excuse to stay home to do the one you didn't do the first time, or at least inspect it to make sure it is not in need of replacement.

I figured as much, You are one of those that has to be told to RTFM because you skipped a few chapters, I can tell. :LOL:

139487
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
One side is harder than the other. Typically the mysterious boot failure>grease sloshing>clicking triggers replacement. In that scenario I would only change the one that failed as the other might last a few more years. 🤞
I've got a drivers side left going out on my 99k mile V6 2012 Honda Crosstour. It's got the wobble in left turns and is beginning to bounce.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Me thinks you misunderstood the con. The con to doing them at the same time is not having the excuse to stay home to do the one you didn't do the first time, or at least inspect it to make sure it is not in need of replacement.

I figured as much, You are one of those that has to be told to RTFM because you skipped a few chapters, I can tell. :LOL:

View attachment 139487
Just seems no need to replace both if there are no symptoms on the opposite side. I'm not seeing any science in your pros and cons.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
Joined
·
4,298 Posts
I've got a drivers side left going out on my 99k mile V6 2012 Honda Crosstour. It's got the wobble in left turns and is beginning to bounce.
I've known some old women like that as well as a few old men. 🤣
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
Joined
·
4,298 Posts
Just seems no need to replace both if there are no symptoms on the opposite side. I'm not seeing any science in your pros and cons.
Okay, I will break it down for you.

The Pro to replacing both at the same time is you won't be doing the same job in the future. You have the thing on jack stands already, you have one that is worn out and another that is worn. If you replace them together its over and done, giving you more time to work on some other issue or watch more youtube videos on synthetic oil comparisons or MaxLife ATF. You know DIY'er Porn.

The Con to replacing both is if you do them both at the same time and later on your wife comes up with some little trip she wants you to accompany her on, such as dress shopping, that you loth to do you do not have a ready made excuse to get out of the trip. You cannot in all honesty look her in the eye and say, "honey I would love to go with you but, I changed that bad CV axel a few weeks back on the car and I really need to take a look at the other one, it may be going bad as well. Safety first Pumpkin."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Okay, I will break it down for you.

The Pro to replacing both at the same time is you won't be doing the same job in the future. You have the thing on jack stands already, you have one that is worn out and another that is worn. If you replace them together its over and done, giving you more time to work on some other issue or watch more youtube videos on synthetic oil comparisons or MaxLife ATF. You know DIY'er Porn.

The Con to replacing both is if you do them both at the same time and later on your wife comes up with some little trip she wants you to accompany her on, such as dress shopping, that you loth to do you do not have a ready made excuse to get out of the trip. You cannot in all honesty look her in the eye and say, "honey I would love to go with you but, I changed that bad CV axel a few weeks back on the car and I really need to take a look at the other one, it may be going bad as well. Safety first Pumpkin."
I have lots of time. And if saving 2 minutes to jack a vehicle up to set on a jack stand again, is the time I save, then I'd go with replacing the one I know is failing. Not to mention holding on to the $350 the additional OEM CV axle would cost.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
Joined
·
4,298 Posts
I have lots of time. And if saving 2 minutes to jack a vehicle up to set on a jack stand again, is the time I save, then I'd go with replacing the one I know is failing. Not to mention holding on to the $350 the additional OEM CV axle would cost.
And if you put that $350 in a savings account, cause your gonna change the other one anyway at some point, you know how much interest it will earn? Not enough to buy one piece of penny candy, because penny candy sells for a nickel these days.

Think of it as doing a timing belt and not the water pump. You're gonna be back in the same place later on. If you are keeping older cars running there is always something else to look at, work on or replace. It's the nature of owning older vehicles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
506 Posts
I seem to remember reading that if your replacing a CV axle, you should replace the other side too. Is this true? What are pros and cons?
I'm generally a "do it all while you're in there" kind of maintenance guy, but I'm voting "no" on this one. I lack the experience to do a pro's and con's list that adds anything to the discussion, but here's my thinking:

1. I've never had the other one fail shortly after replacing one.
2. Doing one side doesn't really have you "in there" to do the other.
3. They warn you when they're done, usually failing slowly, with minimal potential for leaving you stranded.
4. I'm too cheap to throw away an expensive part that might have 30k miles left in it.
 

·
Registered
2008 Honda Pilot EX-L 2013 Honda Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
Just replace what’s broken. I always replace a full set of tires, left and right brakes. If one axle is fine, I’d skip it. It may not even fail for a very long time. I prefer to hold on to $350 if I can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm generally a "do it all while you're in there" kind of maintenance guy, but I'm voting "no" on this one. I lack the experience to do a pro's and con's list that adds anything to the discussion, but here's my thinking:

1. I've never had the other one fail shortly after replacing one.
2. Doing one side doesn't really have you "in there" to do the other.
3. They warn you when they're done, usually failing slowly, with minimal potential for leaving you stranded.
4. I'm too cheap to throw away an expensive part that might have 30k miles left in it.
My thoughts exactly.
And I'm still waiting for someone to prove the technical benefit of replacing both at the same time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
And if you put that $350 in a savings account, cause your gonna change the other one anyway at some point, you know how much interest it will earn? Not enough to buy one piece of penny candy, because penny candy sells for a nickel these days.

Think of it as doing a timing belt and not the water pump. You're gonna be back in the same place later on. If you are keeping older cars running there is always something else to look at, work on or replace. It's the nature of owning older vehicles.
There is no technical support for replacing both if only one is failing. They are two like parts operating independently from the other on opposite sides of the vehicle. A timing belt can fail instantly without warning. These don't.
 

·
Registered
2008 Honda Pilot EX-L 2013 Honda Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
There is no technical support for replacing both if only one is failing. They are two like parts operating independently from the other on opposite sides of the vehicle. A timing belt can fail instantly without warning. These don't.
And it's not really shared labor. All of the timing belt stuff has to be removed anyways, whereas axles are on different sides of the car.
Just replace the one that's failed. Enjoy the satisfaction that comes from fixing something yourself, and be exited that you may be able to do it again for the other side. 😆
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,573 Posts
Technically both axles adhere to the same mileage and what ever gets tossed at them for the environment . So if one fails then i'm sure the other will fail soon...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Technically both axles adhere to the same mileage and what ever gets tossed at them for the environment . So if one fails then i'm sure the other will fail soon...
I don't believe that's always the case. For example..., A person for 6 years, going to work may driven the vehicle on city streets with left turns out numbering right turns (or vise versa) 2 to 1. But on the return trip, it's faster to take the highway even though it's a little longer. The result is one CV axle worn out faster than the other. 🤓
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
Joined
·
4,298 Posts
Technically both axles adhere to the same mileage and what ever gets tossed at them for the environment . So if one fails then i'm sure the other will fail soon...
With that in mind, most of use check the date of manufacture of our tires and watch for old, cracking rubber. I'm not aware of any magical rubber compound for the CV boots. The rubber gets old over time and fails. I'm just guessing here but I don't think Honda is putting on 1 axel with a boot made yesterday and the other axel with a boot made 3 years ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
With that in mind, most of use check the date of manufacture of our tires and watch for old, cracking rubber. I'm not aware of any magical rubber compound for the CV boots. The rubber gets old over time and fails. I'm just guessing here but I don't think Honda is putting on 1 axel with a boot made yesterday and the other axel with a boot made 3 years ago.
I do not have failed rubber boots on either side.
 
1 - 20 of 112 Posts
Top