Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Switched states and plates today — and in removing my very rusty license plate bolts on my 2015 the post came clean off the welds on the rear hatch. I didn’t apply much force and it just snapped clean off.

For now, I snapped open the trim and ran a zip tie through the hole to temporarily hold it. I was thinking of getting a long enough stainless bolt and nuts and rigging it up through the hole underneath.

Anyone have suggestions for a more permanent solution?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
Grab some of your favorite epoxy and glue the block back on. Prep first of course, plus run a tap through the block to clean out any corrosion before you glue it back on. Then paint. It's hidden by the license plate so you don't need it to be a Picasso-quality touch-up, but you do want it all to be protected.

For others playing along at home... OK to use stainless or chrome hardware, with some anti-seize on the threads. Under certain circumstances I've use pipe dope and Hylomar gasket compound instead to make sure no moisture would get in again. Make sure the hardware you use isn't too long -- you need just enough to engage the threaded block, while too long will jack the little block off the body panel.

I'm all in on the 6mm Nutsert solution too, so long as the hole gets sealed completely by the bolt. Prime the hole before placing the Nutsert or rust will eventually consume that part of the panel.

-----

I found some secure Torx screws in chrome at my local Ace hardware store. 6mm threads. the plates come off a few times a year for total clean-and-detail. In the winter, local hwy dept uses a wonderful brown de-icer that likes to find places to hide, and that includes the plate mounts and the pretty chrome bolts. The bolts go into the ultrasonic cleaner, the mounting blocks are sealed at the body joint with some electronics-grade clear silicone. I fount a new ultra-clear sealant that's a solvent-flash cure rather than the more common (corrosive) acetic acid RTV, and will report back on how well it works on a different project before recommending it here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
What a terrible design these plate mounting blocks have.
Mine are working great. They succumb to excessive tightening torque and corrosion issues. Would be cool if there were originally plastic screws. But with just the smallest amount of care and prep they will last a long time.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top