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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The previous owner of my 04 Pilot had the ignition cylinder replaced a few years ago (due to the common failure problem you Pilot veterans know all about), but he just used the new key that came with the new ignition cylinder to start the car, and used the original key to open the door locks (because the actuators were all bad and he couldn't unlock the doors electronically). So he always carried 2 keys around, one for the doors, and one for the ignition, but now the door locks are really worn out and you have to wobble the key around to get it to work right. I figure I would only use the door key in case of an emergency like a dead car battery or dead remote, but I don't want to have to carry both keys around, so I'd like to replace the door (and tailgate) cylinders with new ones.

If I buy new cylinders, I assume I can have a locksmith rekey the new lock cylinders to match my existing ignition key. Does anyone know approximately how much that might cost? If it's more than $100 I think I might order a tumbler kit and see if I can have a go at rekeying my cylinder for fun: https://www.clksupplies.com/products/honda-high-security-pinning-kit-a-19-108

Once I get this straightened out, I'm going to buy one of those cool flip keys with the remote built in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I guess I can answer my own question. I ordered a set of lock cylinder wafers for about $30, they arrived yesterday, so I took apart one of my door cylinders and figured out the exact location of the 5 positions along the length of my old door keys that line up with the 8 separate wafers, and then found the pattern between the key-cut depth and wafer number (each wafer has a 0.3mm difference), and then used my digital calipers to measure the grooves on my newer ignition key to decode the pattern for my ignition key. I then replaced the various wafers in the door cylinders to make them match my ignition cylinder, and voila, now my old door lock cylinders match the new ignition cylinder, and I can open the doors and start the car with a single key. I'll do my tailgate cylinder next, but overall I'm assuming I saved some money since I figure a locksmith would charge more than $30 for rekeying 3 cylinders, plus I learned something new.
 

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Banned from wife’s 2005 Pilot LX
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Nice going figuring that out yourself. Did the wafer kit come with any special tools required to change them out?

When I replaced the exterior locks on my house I bought one of the rekeying kits. It was so simple to change the lock pegs out that I couldn’t imagine why anyone would pay a locksmith $100 per door. I think that kit was less than $20 for rekeying five cylinders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nope, no special tools necessary, besides needle nose pliers and tweezers. There are only 6 different wafer sizes, and I was able to rearrange the order of the existing pins to match the new key to where I only needed to use 2 new wafers per lock, so I could have just bought a 10-pack of each of the two wafers I needed for a lot less money, but I didn't know what I needed till I took the lock apart. Now that I know how to decode a key by measuring it, I could compare any 2 keys and know what wafers need to be moved or replaced. Not sure what to do with this information, but I guess I could help out a friend if they need their locks redone in the future, or keep the kit till I get my next Honda.
 

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Nope, no special tools necessary, besides needle nose pliers and tweezers. There are only 6 different wafer sizes, and I was able to rearrange the order of the existing pins to match the new key to where I only needed to use 2 new wafers per lock, so I could have just bought a 10-pack of each of the two wafers I needed for a lot less money, but I didn't know what I needed till I took the lock apart. Now that I know how to decode a key by measuring it, I could compare any 2 keys and know what wafers need to be moved or replaced. Not sure what to do with this information, but I guess I could help out a friend if they need their locks redone in the future, or keep the kit till I get my next Honda.
This is amazing!
Thanks for the insight.
I had no idea this could be done.
It's awsome to figure out a problem and fix on your own. I had nothing to offer you on this one. I was thinking you could rob the ignition and locks off a junked Pilot, but it it's not something salvage yards offered. They want you to buy the whole door with the lock in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I posted my update here since I figure this site is such a useful reference that someone in the future might come across it and find it helpful. In the past 6 weeks since I got my Pilot, I've googled dozens of different topics when looking for advice on repairs or parts or operation of this car, and 95% of the time the results lead me to this site. But there's not much info out there about rekeying a Honda lock, except for a few youtube videos that are somewhat helpful but not entirely. If I had lots of money, I would have just taken it to a locksmith, but since I've got plenty of time and no money, doing it the DIY way was more fun. Just removing and replacing the door cylinders is the most time consuming part. Changing the lock wafers took less than a minute, once I figured out the trick. The other hard part is measuring out the grooves in the key. You need the right tools to measure the fraction of a millimeter difference and at what locations on the key. It might have been quicker for me to remove the ignition cylinder and pull the wafers out of that (each wafer has it's number printed on it), but I didn't want to accidentally break that or screw it up. New door cylinders are much cheaper so I figured I'd experiment with that in case I broke it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I guess there's a fine line between a burglar and a legit locksmith. My method only works if you have access to the key or the back side of the lock to remove the cylinder, so I'm afraid I'm still pretty innocent.
 

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I guess there's a fine line between a burglar and a legit locksmith. My method only works if you have access to the key or the back side of the lock to remove the cylinder, so I'm afraid I'm still pretty innocent.
You know you want this now. :ROFLMAO: It's like when you were a kid, you've learned a new skill. Nothing better than learning to reverse engineer the process.


What surprises me is that those are sold on the inter web.
 

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You know you want this now. :ROFLMAO: It's like when you were a kid, you've learned a new skill. Nothing better than learning to reverse engineer the process.


What surprises me is that those are sold on the inter web.
Buy a complete set, get the official mask free!

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
What surprises me is that those are sold on the inter web.
From what I found while researching the topic, most legit vendors will only sell lockpicking tools to certified locksmiths or someone with similar credentials for buying the tools. Many locations in the US restrict the sale or possession of those tools as well. Tennessee and North Carolina are the worst apparently. Wafers for repairing or rekeying a lock aren't included in those restrictions, so anyone can buy those. The tools shown in that photo above wouldn't even work in a Honda cylinder. But swapping wafers is all I needed to do, so that's as far as I need to go on the topic. Now I'm back to banging around under the car with big tools as I replace all my suspension. I prefer big tools and parts over tiny microscopic parts anyday.
 

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From what I found while researching the topic, most legit vendors will only sell lockpicking tools to certified locksmiths or someone with similar credentials for buying the tools. Many locations in the US restrict the sale or possession of those tools as well. Tennessee and North Carolina are the worst apparently. Wafers for repairing or rekeying a lock aren't included in those restrictions, so anyone can buy those. The tools shown in that photo above wouldn't even work in a Honda cylinder. But swapping wafers is all I needed to do, so that's as far as I need to go on the topic. Now I'm back to banging around under the car with big tools as I replace all my suspension. I prefer big tools and parts over tiny microscopic parts anyday.
You would be surprised what a little practice with what I posted would work on. In my past life a couple of people I worked with picked up sets and learned to use them. They didn't have many opportunities but on a couple of occasions their skills were helpful. Kept us from having to damage some expensive pieces of furniture, even though we had all the legal right to do so.
 
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