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Discussion Starter #1
2004 EX
78k

My brother and I installed a set of LTX M/S's last night and during the alignment we tried to fix the passenger rear suspension adjustment bolt that we noticed was frozen (to the suspension bushing) the last time we had the Pilot on the alignment rack.

I ordered a 'BOLT KIT, ADJUST' (~$21) from the dealer (includes all parts for both sides) to have (just in case there were issues with the 'work' on the bolt.)
#43
http://www.hondaautomotiveparts.com/auto/jsp/mws/catimgs/14S9V0_B29.gif

The OE driver’s side bolt/nut/cam washer was removed and replaced without issue (with a nice application of lube on the bolt). The driver’s side was another story. After a bit of hammer work (big hammer) we decided not to push our luck (destroy the bolt/arm/sub-frame = bad) and backed off with the bolt removal work.

The bushing can't be ordered separately... you have to buy the whole suspension arm. :confused:

I will post the part number for the 'bolt kit' once I get home.

Fortunately the alignment was close to the specs that I wanted without having to adjust the passenger rear... I just hope that the alignment holds for a while.

FYI:
I 'highly' suggest checking your alignment bolts for free play and applying a lube of your choice to prevent your bolts from siezing up.

William :(
 

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Here is how one owner repaired his vehicle. It is an Odyssey.
http://www.odyclub.com/forums/showthread.php?threadid=33112&perpage=15&highlight=frozen+alignment+bolt&pagenumber=1
"The bushing is not available by itself. You have to buy the entire control arm."

"
1. Jack up car and remove wheel. Use jack stands, etc. to keep car up as you are going to need your floor jack later to uncompress the spring. You should use jack stands anytime you have the car up anyhow.
2. Disconnect ABS sensor wire from lower arm. Two small 10mm bolts for this if I remember correctly.
3. Place jack under control arm (directly under spring). Apply enough force to start to compress spring. Doing this takes the spring load off the hub
4. Remove bolt that holds arm to hub. If you don't do step #3 then the spring will try to drive the hub down as you remove the bolt and it will bind up as you remove the bolt. You need to use the jack to uncompress the spring.
5. With bolt removed, you can lower the jack and uncompress the spring. The arm will move down beyond hub as the spring uncompresses. Watch that you don't catch the ABS sensor wire as you lower the arm/spring.
6. With the spring uncompressed, remove the spring and plastic pads on top and bottom. The car needs to be high enough to snake the spring out.
7. Examine the adjustment bolt that connects the arm to the body. This eccentric bolt and washer combo is what is used to change the toe (and camber?) on the rear suspension. The washer that is on the nut side of the bolt has five marks on it. Note which mark on the washer is pointing straight up. You need this setting later on.
8. At this point, if you didn't have this problem, you could just remove this bolt and the entire arm would drop right out. But since the bolt is frozen to the sleeve in the bushing, you can't remove it even if you can get the nut off. There is about ½ inch gap on each side of the bushing. Using a reciprocating saw, you cut through the rubber bushing, the metal bushing sleeve and the bolt in this gap. Do this on both sides. Do not try to cut the head of the bolt or nut off on the outside. You can saw in the gap without damage to the body mounting points.
9. Once the bolt is cut, each end of the bolt should drop out and you should be able to remove the arm.
10. Assembly is pretty much the reverse. I used white lithium grease to lubricate the bolt before putting it into the bushing sleeve. Time will tell if this works well enough. Tighten, but don’t torque the nut on this bolt just yet.
11. Reinstall the spring and don’t forget the pads. Make sure the spring is rotated correctly so it sits in the arm correctly. If you look at the spring carrier on the arm you will see how this works.
12. With spring in place, compress the spring with the jack until the arm meets the hub and reinstall the bolt on the hub. Make sure the spring is in the correct spot both top and bottom as you do this. With the bolt in place, you should be able to lower the jack under the arm now.
13. Reinstall the ABS sensor wire onto the new arm.
14. At this point it is together, but you now need to rotate the eccentric bolt and replicate the alignment setting that you noted in Step #7.
15. Torque both bolts to the proper spec.
16. Replace tire and lower car.

Even if your alignment was correct prior to doing this, and you replicated the alignment settings in Steps #7 and 14, I would get the car realigned anyhow.

After I was finished, I was curious if I could get the frozen bolt out. I took a metal punch and a hammer and I could not get the bolt to budge. I didn't attack it with a BFH, as I basically wanted to prove to myself, that cutting it out was the only option."
 

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Geez, you guys got me worried now ;) . Going for a wheel alignment tomorrow b/c I just did my inner tie rods and have a bent link on the rear suspension. I'd hate to get a call saying the alignment bolts are frozen...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the link. :D

I thought about using the saw to cut the old bolt up and then removing the arm... I just need to buy the arm and have it handy.

I have (and will be) coating the bolts with lots of lube to help prevent this in the future.
:4:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Installed the new arm this past weekend.

Part numbers:
52350-S9V-A00 (Arm B, R. 701695) (Pass)
52360-S9V-A00 (Arm B, L. 701696) (Drivers)

List price is $110.48

The use of a corded, reciprocating saw was the best bet (I would have like to use the plasma cutter... but took a 'less destructive' approach). :D
I was able to use 1 blade to cut the old arm off.

The rear cut was easier because the bolt was all that was cut (and you can slightly pull the subframe away from the bushing so that the blade can slide down and cut on the bolt).
The front cut was a harder because I had to chop thru ~80% of the bushing before the head of the bolt fell off (then the arm fell free).

Lots of anti-seize was applied to the new bolt before install.

A visit to the alignment shop is next on my list. :2:
 

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@Willard I must be your doppelganger - same issue here, your advice is much appreciated and I have a Volvo 240 right next to the pilot in the middle of reconstruction!
 
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