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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently noticed that the drivers reverse light stays on all the time when lights are on. The passanger side doesn't work at all even with a new bulb. I took the drivers bulb out and the passanger side started working. I decided to check the fuses and to my surprise the fuse box in the very back is missing! I see a metal post where it possibly went but no fuse box at all. I also see a harness that is unplugged. I have no idea where to start. Any help appreciated
 

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Sounds more like you have a bad ground in one of the taillight assemblies, bad grounds frequently cause issues with current going through a talllight bulb finding a ground through another circuit, like a turn signal lamp. A bad fuse would keep lights from working at all. The missing fuse box in the rear you refer to (left rear quarter panel?) would be the additional fuse block that gets installed with the optional trailer wiring kit. Check all of the bulbs and sockets in both taillight assemblies first, if there's a corroded lamp base that could do it. If not, you'll have to follow wires from the taillights to find the ground wire(s). They may be broken or the body ground could be corroded. Don't overlook that there may be break in the light socket; that happened to me once on an old GMC van where turning on the headlights caused the left turn signals (including the dash indicator) to light up. Was a broken ground terminal in the left front marker lamp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sounds more like you have a bad ground in one of the taillight assemblies, bad grounds frequently cause issues with current going through a talllight bulb finding a ground through another circuit, like a turn signal lamp. A bad fuse would keep lights from working at all. The missing fuse box in the rear you refer to (left rear quarter panel?) would be the additional fuse block that gets installed with the optional trailer wiring kit. Check all of the bulbs and sockets in both taillight assemblies first, if there's a corroded lamp base that could do it. If not, you'll have to follow wires from the taillights to find the ground wire(s). They may be broken or the body ground could be corroded. Don't overlook that there may be break in the light socket; that happened to me once on an old GMC van where turning on the headlights caused the left turn signals (including the dash indicator) to light up. Was a broken ground terminal in the left front marker lamp.
Thank you so much! I will definitely take a look at everything! Glad to know the fuse box is just for a trailer! I was so confused!
 

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Yes. Wiring pic is in your other thread.

Housekeeping: Try to keep the info in one thread if you can It makes it a lot easier for others in the future to see the info they seek all in one thread. :)
 

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Two ground points serve the rear lights and accessories:

G505: Right brake light, Right back-up light, Right rear side marker light, Right rear turn signal light, Right taillights

G601: Cargo area accessory power socket, Electrical compass unit (GND)*29, Hatch glass opener actuator, Hatch glass
opener switch, Hatch glass latch switch, High mount brake light, Left rear side marker light, Left taillights, Left
rear turn signal light, Left brake light, Left back-up light, License plate lights, Power tailgate inside beeper, Rear
window defogger, Rear window wiper motor, Tailgate latch switch*3, Tailgate outer handle switch*3, Tailgate
release actuator*3

The asterisked (*) notes refer to components that may not be included in your model.

G505 is located in the right rear quarter by the tail light.

G601 is at the rear center of the roof. May be accessed after removing the rear cargo light assembly, but that's a guess.

If you have an issue with G601, a LOT of stuff will be acting up.

Look hard at the local tail light harnesses for wire and socket damage. Those are the most common areas that get damaged when bulbs are replaced. Damage there is much more common than the ground connections themselves.

You can test the ground from the socket with a test light made from a regular 12V bulb and 12V current source, maybe more effective than trying to read a resistance with an Ohm meter. Generally, testing for open or weak grounds like this is best done with a low-impedance circuit tester, rather than a high-impedance meter.
 
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