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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, had an alignment done today and was told the rear camber adjusting bolts are rusted seized and need to be cut out. They say doing so has a very high chance of damaging the bushing on the rear lower control arm. Is this true?

He couldn't find aftermarket rear control arms so went through the dealership at $800 total for both sides and 4 hours labor.
Alignment needs to be done cause the tires on it when I bought were eaten on the inside and I just put on new AT's that I don't want the same issue with.
What do you think?

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I had a similar issue for the bolt securing the lower control arm to the rear knuckle. The bolts Honda use are slotted on the sides which traps water. The bolt then rusts to the metal sleeve in the bushing it slides thru.

I broke the bolt head trying to loosen the bolt, I ended up cutting out the lower control arm, then had to drill out the rubber bushing (with a broken bolt in it).

The local shop I prefer stated that they warn customers attempting to remove the Honda bolts may result in a broken bolt and more extensive repairs to get it apart.

I assume your springs have sagged. I replaced the upper control arm with an adjustable link. Also, if your shop can get the springs out, would consider Moog Problem Solver springs ...but may run into more rusted bolt issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I had a similar issue for the bolt securing the lower control arm to the rear knuckle. The bolts Honda use are slotted on the sides which traps water. The bolt then rusts to the metal sleeve in the bushing it slides thru.

I broke the bolt head trying to loosen the bolt, I ended up cutting out the lower control arm, then had to drill out the rubber bushing (with a broken bolt in it).

The local shop I prefer stated that they warn customers attempting to remove the Honda bolts may result in a broken bolt and more extensive repairs to get it apart.

I assume your springs have sagged. I replaced the upper control arm with an adjustable link. Also, if your shop can get the springs out, would consider Moog Problem Solver springs ...but may run into more rusted bolt issues.
Ok, thank you for the confirmation and suggestions! I'll call him tomorrow and see if they give me a deal on installing MOOG 81649 springs while the control arm gets replaced.
Fooken costly surprise here, but it's leave it as is and replace the tires again in a couple years or get it done and have a smoother ride and longer tire life...
Cheers
 

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Nobili spiritus embiggens pequeño sparus tyre.
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That's a really expensive prognosis to be hit with.
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I replaced the upper control arm with an adjustable link.

Yeah, couldn't this be solved for way less money with a pair of adjustable rear upper control arms? Anybody got a preference between Mevotech and Moog?





A few years ago, I installed those Moogs to compensate for negative camber, set 'em and forget 'em, after an alignment. A year or two later, they had rusted seized because I didn't bother to grease 'em up from time to time. I just put regular nonadjustable ones back in. But now I'm back to eyeballing what I perceive to be negative camber again, and I would really like my Michelin LTX-MS2s to have a fighting chance to reach their touted life expectancy without looking like this. :(

So those Mevotechs are now sitting in my garage, waiting for a day I feel inspired to swap them in. However, this time, I promise myself to grease them up from time to time. To that end, the Mevotechs have motivating zerks (aka "180 Degree SAE grease fittings"). Yay, real zerks!
 

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