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Hi everyone, My 2007 pilot Rear AC wasn’t working and there was a random clicking like sound coming from the back of the dashboard. I was able to correct both issues and it was quite easy. I just want to pass on information on how to repair on your own.

For the rear AC fix, I took out the resistor module off and opened up and I found a bad component (microtemp thermo fuse axial cutoff) other parts measured Good with my multi meter so I ordered the bad resistor from eBay then did the installation and the rear ac now works.

for the clicking noise behind the dashboard things where a little for complicated but nothing too difficult. I removed the temp door blend actuator removed the old grease and cleaned all the parts including the gears then applied new grease then put everything back together and now the noise is gone! I’m leaving a YouTube video that I found with steps by steps. Thanks for reading this and I hope this information could help anyone with similar issues. Here sis the YouTube link and some pictures that I took.

best,
Alex.




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Nice write-up.

Looks like yours is clean, but others may want to vacuum out the rear blower’s filter screen. I’ve added doing that to the 15k mile service interval on my Pilot. The filter clogging with lint increases the likelihood the rear transistor (resistor for LX trim) module will fail.
 

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Good for you for swapping out the actual thermistor. For those who are soldering-challenged, you can spend the big bucks to get the whole module you can just twist out and in to replace. :)

Rear Blower Motor Transistor Resistor for Honda Pilot | eBay

https://www.amazon.com/Replacement-Rear-Blower-Motor-Resistor/dp/B07FFB3XZ7/ref=psdc_15730391_t1_B07GKFDVH8#customerReviews

Rear blower thermistor (aka thermal resistor aka transistor). Just did this and that was the cure.

View attachment 138234



But start by seeing if just cleaning the rear blower motor fan with a vacuum cleaner might do the trick. To clean the rear blower fan, remove the driver's side panel under the center console between the driver's seat and the gas pedal. The panel just snaps out and it's easiest if you start pulling near the gas pedal.

View attachment 138235




Thermistor installation tips:
  1. Remove wiring harness connector.
  2. Depress little black metal tab just outside housing and rotate old thermistor clockwise so notches align and it pulls straight out easily.
  3. Install new thermistor by sliding in and rotating counterclockwise so notches no longer line up.
  4. Rebend little black metal tab to hold thermistor in place if necessary. It should snap into place.
  5. Reconnect wiring harness.
  6. Test. If it works you've just saved hundreds of dollars.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nice write-up.

Looks like yours is clean, but others may want to vacuum out the rear blower’s filter screen. I’ve added doing that to the 15k mile service interval on my Pilot. The filter clogging with lint increases the likelihood the rear transistor (resistor for LX trim) module will fail.
Hi, the filter was actually completely clogged. I took the grill off to clean it and also used a vacuum to clean the area around the motor blower. I also replaced the cabin filter it was dirty and full of dry leaves. You’re correct if the filter is clogged things will overheat and heat is a problem when it comes to electronics.
 

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Good for you for swapping out the actual thermistor. For those who are soldering-challenged, you can spend the big bucks to get the whole module you can just twist out and in to replace. :)

Rear Blower Motor Transistor Resistor for Honda Pilot | eBay

https://www.amazon.com/Replacement-Rear-Blower-Motor-Resistor/dp/B07FFB3XZ7/ref=psdc_15730391_t1_B07GKFDVH8#customerReviews
You’re correct, basic soldering and electronic knowledge could save you $$$. There are cheaper aftermarket alternatives but I preferred to repair the original oem part of possible.
 

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You’re correct, basic soldering and electronic knowledge could save you $$$. There are cheaper aftermarket alternatives but I preferred to repair the original oem part of possible.
Did you have to trim the thermistor legs? Did you have to add wire insulating sleeving to help preclude any potential shorting of the legs?

Funny timing; I've ordered and received them because I have to do this job on the Pilot of someone I know.
 

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Thanks man!!! On my List of To Do’s!!
You’re welcome, thanks!
Did you have to trim the thermistor legs? Did you have to add wire insulating sleeving to help preclude any potential shorting of the legs?

Funny timing; I've ordered and received them because I have to do this job on the Pilot of someone I know.
Yes I did trim the legs and removed the insulation from the bad thermistor to use it with the new one, good luck!
 
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