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2005 Honda Pilot, 191,000 miles
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I noticed today that my right rear wheel has some negative camber, left side is fine. Top of the wheel is angled in a bit. So it’s time to do the upper control arms. My question is, The aftermarket MOOG adjustable arms will require an alignment after I install them. If I buy The Honda OEM part, it is not adjustable and will not require an alignment. My question is, is there a drawback to NOT getting an adjustable arm? Also, I get Honda parts at cost +5% through work so I can get any Honda part for cheaper than any aftermarket brand. My pilot is stock ride height, no lift, all stock suspension.
 

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Nobili spiritus embiggens pequeño sparus tyre.
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I had some adjustable rear upper control arm, and yes, I needed an alignment. However, if you don't keep them lubed/grease, they rust into nonadjustable ones, which is what happened. In the end, I just went back to standard nonadjustable ones. If I did ever go back to adjustable ones again, I'd make sure to lube them regularly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I had some adjustable rear upper control arm, and yes, I needed an alignment. However, if you don't keep them lubed/grease, they rust into nonadjustable ones, which is what happened. In the end, I just went back to standard nonadjustable ones. If I did ever go back to adjustable ones again, I'd make sure to lube them regularly.
So it sounds like the better solution is OEM non adjustable. I kind of thought the only reason you need an adjustable set is for a lift, and since I don’t have one it’s easier just to get the original part. Solves both my questions haha thank you plplplpl!
 

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I had originally put the adjustable upper control arms on to correct negative camber it looked like it had just eyeballing it. New KYB shocks helped, too. Still have those on, of course. TBH, It now still kind of looks like it has a bit of negative camber with the nonadjustable ones back on but that may just be my mind playing tricks on me. I haven't gone back to an alignment place to get the specs. I might someday and might go back once again to adjustable rear upper control arms if I do in fact have negative camber, but I'll have to be sure to lube them regularly. These days, the Pilot isn't as loaded as previously and I don't tow, so it's not really a priority.

tl;dr: Inconclusive.

Therefore, it might be good to get opinions from folks who have succeeded in verifiably correcting negative camber.
 

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So I noticed today that my right rear wheel has some negative camber, left side is fine. Top of the wheel is angled in a bit. So it’s time to do the upper control arms. My question is, The aftermarket MOOG adjustable arms will require an alignment after I install them. If I buy The Honda OEM part, it is not adjustable and will not require an alignment. My question is, is there a drawback to NOT getting an adjustable arm?
Driving around with negative camber may lead to unusual tire wear. Installing the adjustable CA could provide the range the alignment tech can use to correct the issue. With age / high mileage the springs sag or BJ and bushings become loose or road impacts to other components. IMO plan on the alignment with or without the adjustable CA for proper tracking down the road.
 

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Nobili spiritus embiggens pequeño sparus tyre.
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Driving around with negative camber may lead to unusual tire wear.
That was my original motivation, when I got my new Michelin LTX M/S2s.
 

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part of my alignments have included rear camber adjustment, so for me the links work. I have thought about adding spacers under the spring as well...successful on other car I had).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I had originally put the adjustable upper control arms on to correct negative camber it looked like it had just eyeballing it. New KYB shocks helped, too. Still have those on, of course. TBH, It now still kind of looks like it has a bit of negative camber with the nonadjustable ones back on but that may just be my mind playing tricks on me. I haven't gone back to an alignment place to get the specs. I might someday and might go back once again to adjustable rear upper control arms if I do in fact have negative camber, but I'll have to be sure to lube them regularly. These days, the Pilot isn't as loaded as previously and I don't tow, so it's not really a priority.

tl;dr: Inconclusive.

Therefore, it might be good to get opinions from folks who have succeeded in verifiably correcting negative camber.
And that is the problem. Of course if you have negative camber a new set of UCA will fix it whether they are adjustable or not. But I was just trying to find out if there was a downside to getting fixed arms. The adjustable ones are pointless for stock suspension. You align it, adjust it, done. It’s not like when you tow something you crank the camber up so it’s level when you’re loaded down, once you unload you put it back to where it was. The fixed arms are at the correct distance 100% of the time with no need to adjust them. F it, I’m gonna get the OEM arms.
 
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