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Discussion Starter #1
Finally did it. Gutted the interior of my Pilot and put sound deadening material in it to help with all the background noise that got on my nerves. We bought an EX 2WD and it became obvious after we had it home that it needed some help. The dealer tells me that the EX-L and higher models come with acoustic glass. Mine did not. I've also read some posts where others have speculated that the Touring and Elite models have extra sound insulation. Don't know about that, but I can tell you from personal experience after removing all the trim, seats, headliner and carpet in my Pilot that Honda did not put anything very impressive in the "plain Jane" EX model I bought to keep the vehicle quiet . We simply did not want leather seats, or else would have purchased a higher-end Pilot. Now that I'm done, I like the results. A cheap, free decibel meter app that I down loaded on the iPhone only shows a 1-2 dB level reduction in noise, but all that non-stop, irritating background drone noise is gone. Glad I went to all the trouble. :)
 

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Glad it's working after all your trouble. Overall SPL ( sound-pressure level ) doesn't tell the whole story, because often it's discrete spikes at certain resonance frequencies that cause the most irritation. For instance the "drone" you cite. There is probably a spectrum analyzer app that would show this. Enhanced noise abatement in Touring/Elite isn't pure speculation. Honda makes that claim. But I don't know what is different. Possibly thicker padding under carpet, inserts in doors, in addition to the acoustic front glass. I know from removing the 3rd-row seats that there is some kind of tar/rubber mat on the floor in the Touring. You can see a bit of it on a side wall of the cargo area near the subwoofer in this photo. There was also polyester mat behind the trim panel.

tar_mat - 1.jpg

Did you use Dyna-mat or something similar?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I wish I knew about the spectrum analyzer app earlier. I used the SPL to get before and readings to see if all the material I put in the car really made any difference. I've done this to a half dozen other vehicles thru the years, including an '05 Pilot once. I can always tell anecdotally that there is an improvement. This time I was hoping to get a little "scientific" proof to back that up. :wink:

I didn't use Dynamat. I bought my material from Sound Deadener Showdown, including their CLD Tiles, MLV, and acoustic foam. I was very pleased with their products.

My Pilot had very little sound insulation by contrast to what was said earlier. Wish I could show you all my photos. There is nothing in the door liners. My 3rd row seat sat on the bare metal floor. Nothing was under it. Not even carpeting. I have the same pad behind the subwoofer, but there is nothing besides bare metal between it and the rear wheels behind it. I removed the speaker and its mat, and stuffed a bunch of sound insulation on top of the rear wheel well. I suspect that was one of the best things I did to help eliminate noise.

BTW, this was by far the most difficult job I have ever done. By far! This generation of Pilots is a big vehicle with lots of parts. It is not designed to be taken apart. Internal trim clearances were very tight leaving very little room for foreign materials ... like sound deadening stuff. It has some of the best fit & finish I've ever seen. The carpet foam padding was even molded to fit the contours of the metal floor. That was impressive. The trim clips and fasteners are very cleverly engineered. In fact Honda requires you to hit the pillar trims with a rubber mallet to release those clips and then replace them with new ones. Ironically, those A, B, C, & D pillars turned out to be the easiest to remove and install. Honda calls for special tools to remove the passenger seat belt connection and roof handles above the doors. I was able to work around that, but wasn't easy. I spent $10 for a day's access to Honda Service Express to print off as many of the interior trim diagrams as I could. There is no way I could have done tis job without the benefit of those guides. Even with them I did not try to remove the center console. It proved to be too intimidating for my DYI abilities. Long story short ... don't attempt this unless you enjoy this sort of a challenge. For me it was fun, but still hard.
 

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Discussion Starter #6

Well, maybe I can attach photos. Here is what my Pilot looks like with the 3rd row seat removed. Seat sits on the floor. No carpet under it. The dark brown material is Honda oem sound dampener. I'd guess 90% of the floor was covered this way from the factory, which I thought was great.


The big issue with the floor was the extensive duct work for rear seating heat & AC vents. I did manage to put some mass load vinyl (MLV) under a few of the floor ducts, like these in front of the 2ndrow seats. The carpet was molded to fit over the duct work which did not leave adequate room to add the MLV.


Here you an see how the carpet foam backing was molded to fit the contours of the floor. Since I did not take out the center consul, I had to install the MLV barrier on the floor by lifting the carpet and working under it. A pain, but worked out okay.
 

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Discussion Starter #7



Here is my passenger side rear wheel well area with the rear trim and speaker subwoofer removed. You can see the outside sheet metal and top of the wheel fender the hole. Honda put some loose fiber mat on the wall behind the speaker in the upper right corner of the photo. I suspect this big open area was a major source of road noise inside the car.





This is the only "after" photo I took of the rear wheel area. This is the driver side. The MLV that I covered the wheel well with and some of the light colored acoustic foam that I installed is visible. What isn't visible in the picture is all the MLV and foam I put over the wheel fender on the other side of the framing, and the foam I was able to stuff inside the hollow Y-shaped frame holding the seat belt and circle access cover. I was also able to attach some foam to the nooks and crannies in the big plastic trim panel that covers the wheel area, but otherwise pretty much left that panel as it came from the factory.
 

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Discussion Starter #8



All 4 doors had this polyester-like fiber fill material in them.Reminded me of the quilt batting that my wife uses when sewing. I'm sure it has some sound proofing value, but Honda actually calls it a "hole filler" on their eStore parts diagram. I took it off and hung a sheet of MLV in it's place.
Bought special Velcro strips from Sound Deadener so that I didn't have to glue anything to the door frame. Unlike Velcro one buys at a retail store, this Velcro has heavy duty glue that holds in high heat.

 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)

The door liner was plain plastic from the factory without anything in it to abate noise.

Here is what the liner looked like after I installed some acoustic foam and acoustic cotton batting (the dark gray stuff). With Honda's oem "hole filler" removed, all this junk fit back onto the door frame just fine too. It ain't pretty, but it's also not seen. Works great ...doors seem dead quiet now.
 

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The big job for me was removing the headliner. I really wanted to put insulation material between it and the roof for help with heat in the summer since it gets so blasted hot where I live. Noise abatement was a secondary consideration. I put some CLD Tiles on the roof to dampen the sheet metal and used UltraTouch Radiant Barrier for the insulation effect. The hard part about removing the headliner is that the washer fluid line for the rear window is attached to the headliner. That line is one whole piece running continuously from the rear window back to where is connects to the washer tank behind the front wheel. So yes, that means you have to remove the front wheel plastic liner and pull the line thru the firewall so that it remains attached as you take down the headliner. And yes, I still found this to be a fun project. As an aside, Honda uses magnets to help hold the headliner to the metal roof. Clever!




 

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Discussion Starter #11
The critical part to reinstalling the headliner was getting trim overlap correct. Honda specifies that the pillar trim extend 5 to 8 mm (no more, no less) for proper air bag deployment. If you watch what you're doing, the headliner will go back up in exactly the same position as it was before it came out. Mine was spot on with no adjustments necessary.
 

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Wow. Nice job on tearing everything apart and getting it back together. These are the type of jobs I wouldn't mine doing once my warranty expires. After seeing your pictures, I do appreciate Honda's skill in packaging all the features into such a tiny space.

Wish you've taken out the middle console at least then it might help me understand where this annoying creaking sound is coming from. I was very surprised that the rear washer fluid hose was one piece, it's great that there's no chance of leaking but that looks like a pain to get that headliner down.
 

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Wish i had the time to take everything apart. All I got done is the doors. Im lagging and need to do the quarter panels. Im impressed how well its insulated from stock with my upgraded speakers and subs. With my music blasted and doors closed from outside I could barely hear my music.
 

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Would like to know what did you do and use? Do you still have everything factory just upgraded the speakers? Planning to do the same. Thanks.

Wish i had the time to take everything apart. All I got done is the doors. Im lagging and need to do the quarter panels. Im impressed how well its insulated from stock with my upgraded speakers and subs. With my music blasted and doors closed from outside I could barely hear my music.
 

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Would like to know what did you do and use? Do you still have everything factory just upgraded the speakers? Planning to do the same. Thanks.
I went with a cheaper route since stock seems to be well insulated. For vibration I use noico butyl 80mil from amazon. Sound insulation i use Noico for CCF and MLV I use the popular homedepot db3. Butyl and MLV are very heavy and most sites don't offer free shipping. Sound deadener got some good quality stuff but shipping will put a hole in your pocket. I live in california and its coming from east coast. I ordered a couple items like butyl rope and the velcro from them. They sent a sample pack of all their product. I have a roll of the so called industrial extra strength velcro from amazon and its crap. I only use it to velcro my amp to the carpet. In summer i can pull back on the velcro and it just comes off my amp without much effort. The glue from the velcro from sound deadener seems to be much better quality that can withstand heat.

Install process is pretty much same as on sound deadener showdown website https://www.sounddeadenershowdown.com/area-treatment/doors

A lot of product instructions like dynomat will tell you to cover the whole door so they can sell you more of their product. All that extra weight will damage your door. Most practice is about 25% covered will eliminate over 90% of the vibration. I recommend getting the butyl rope from sound deadener for the door beams. Honda put very little butyl between the door beam and door sheet metal.

my setup is Polk db6502 fronts and db652 for rear. Push close to 100w rms each speaker. In the trunk cargo space I'm maxing out two MTX fpr10. The polks made the most difference. With OEM speakers I notice I was cranking it up to 25 but now my listening volume is no more than 15 and it sounds louder and better than it was at 25 with oem speakers.
 

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I went with a cheaper route since stock seems to be well insulated. For vibration I use noico butyl 80mil from amazon. Sound insulation i use Noico for CCF and MLV I use the popular homedepot db3. Butyl and MLV are very heavy and most sites don't offer free shipping. Sound deadener got some good quality stuff but shipping will put a hole in your pocket. I live in california and its coming from east coast. I ordered a couple items like butyl rope and the velcro from them. They sent a sample pack of all their product. I have a roll of the so called industrial extra strength velcro from amazon and its crap. I only use it to velcro my amp to the carpet. In summer i can pull back on the velcro and it just comes off my amp without much effort. The glue from the velcro from sound deadener seems to be much better quality that can withstand heat.

Install process is pretty much same as on sound deadener showdown website https://www.sounddeadenershowdown.com/area-treatment/doors

A lot of product instructions like dynomat will tell you to cover the whole door so they can sell you more of their product. All that extra weight will damage your door. Most practice is about 25% covered will eliminate over 90% of the vibration. I recommend getting the butyl rope from sound deadener for the door beams. Honda put very little butyl between the door beam and door sheet metal.

my setup is Polk db6502 fronts and db652 for rear. Push close to 100w rms each speaker. In the trunk cargo space I'm maxing out two MTX fpr10. The polks made the most difference. With OEM speakers I notice I was cranking it up to 25 but now my listening volume is no more than 15 and it sounds louder and better than it was at 25 with oem speakers.
Does the db3 have an odor? Thinking about using luxury liner pro as my blocker. But its so expensive. Plus shipping is an arm and a leg. So far I've used stinger roadkill and dynaliner on the doors and rear panels. I just order Raamaudio ensolite and deadner for the floors and firewalI. I am not going to tackle the headliner as I am worried about fit and possible issues. So far its a big improvement over stock. Its true once you make it more quite. You hear little noise that was not heard before.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I looked that DB3 up online at Home Depot. With a noise coefficient rating (NRC) rating of .75 it looks like an intriguing alternative to MLV in a car, especially if it is relatively thin and flexible. Nonetheless NRC is a measure of how well material adsorbs sound. MLV is typically used to block sound transmission, and is measured by STC, or sound transmission class. So technically speaking, using DB3 as a MLV replacement is a little bit of an apples to oranges comparison. But if it works who cares! Especially considering the cost difference. I've done a lot of automotive sound deadening in my time and often wonder if absorbing sound in a vehicle isn't more important than blocking sound. I'll definitely look in to it the next time.
 

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This is the main reason I went to the Elite its by far the quietest vehicle I have ever driven in. I can hear people in the third row talking softly never ever had that before, even with snow tires you can't hear the hum from the tires.
 
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