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Anyone been driving for 50+ years have any comments on how well they adjusted to their push button transmission?
Examples, getting in an out of a parking space at night, any near-accidents in the garage, etc.



Thinking about trading in my '17 Ridgeline Blk Ed. for a Pilot, but...


TIA!
 

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It doesn't take long to get used to. The first time you have to make a quick change (like a U turn turning into a 3 point turn with traffic bearing down on you ) will get a little stressful.
 

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You get use to it but the speed and effort slightly changes, but when i say change im probably talking very minuscule in comparison. I know for sure there is 2 10ths of a sec more required to make sure my finger is on to of the right button. and because of that it can never really feel like a part of you like traditional shift levers. where you dont even have to look at all even if its for a fraction of a second--as that is still required effort and time. Traditional levers you already know if its in drive moving it up will bring you in neutral, or if in reverse you just flick the lever all the way down knowing it will stop in D, all this while requiring no additional mental effort on one's part.

i hope that very descriptive take gives you an idea. The push buttons are definitely cool and makes the cabin seem more open.
 

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I think the push button transmission is one of the best things about the Honda. I haven't been driving for 50+ years, but it took me a couple of days to adjust to buttons. The thing you have to recognize is the buttons are all different geometries sizes and obviously in specific locations, so you quickly learn the difference between Neutral, Reverse, and Drive, by feel alone. IMO, there two things that make the buttons superior to a stick.

1) There is no stick getting in the way. If you need to move something across the gears, or put something in the little tray, you don't have a gear shift to work around. That may seem like a small thing, but it makes that part of the cockpit feel more open;

2) Shifting is exact and you don't have to look. A friend of mine has a 2018 Pacifica which uses a dial *facepalm*. I had to specifically look at the dial and found that it was easy to miss the desired gear. I find the same thing on traditional autos. My wife has an auto which we've had for 7 years. I still have to look at the gear box to see that I've put the car in the right gear.

I've seen some people make exceedingly stupid criticisms of the the buttons, like a fear you'll press a button while driving. You have to have the break engaged to shift gears. Pushing a button while driving does nothing. A lot of car reviewers complain about the buttons. Why? What do you need a shift lever for, it's an automatic. If you want to manual shift, the steering wheel has paddle shifters.

Now, the paddles shifters have caused me problems. About once every 2-4 months, I'll accidentally hit one of the paddles when turning or grabbing the wheel. That is annoying. I do wish there was a way to disengage the paddle shifters in Drive mode, but maybe that has some associated risks. I have essentially never needed the paddle shifters, though I think some people use them for engine breaking.

I can't speak for the 2016 models, but I have a 2017, and I would not hesitate to buy a 9 speed again. I have had zero problems with the transmission. Yes, it shifts more than a 6 speed, but so what. The car gets better gas mileage and has better acceleration.
 

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I received my driver's license in 1979, so I'm 40 years into it now. I had a pushbutton advantage before buying the Pilot, in that I own an RV with an Allison automatic transmission and pushbutton shifter. The mechanics of shifting in between modes becomes automatic after a couple weeks. If you remember the dash-mounted pushbutton shifters on early Chrysler cars, you can imagine that it would be awfully easy to inadvertently shift into reverse while moving forward. The design of the Pilot reverse button, where you have to pull to the rear to shift into reverse, just about prevents that from being a problem. I would guess that there is probably an electronic lock-out, but won't risk testing it on my own Pilot.

One thing that requires adjustment, mentioned above, is that the transmission is slow in responding to driver input. Three-point turns are time-consuming. It bothered me in the beginning, but I don't think about it now. The slow response to input is not restricted to the console buttons. The steering wheel shift paddles don't improve the shift times. I do use them frequently for descending steep grades, but the response is nothing like we get from the RV or our BMW X3, which provide nearly instant response to shifter input. The slow shifting of the ZF 9-speed is due to the time required to synchronize gears with the dog-clutch design. It is an interference engagement. There is no slippage, as you would have with a friction clutch. The gear speeds must match exactly before engaging, and that takes time.

I had an adjustment period where I seriously considered getting rid of the Pilot, and the transmission performance was high on the list of dislikes. I'm over it now, and with 21000 miles under my belt, I'm happy with the car.
 

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... I would guess that there is probably an electronic lock-out, but won't risk testing it on my own Pilot.
Yes. If you hit the reverse and you aren't all but stopped, it will simply beep at you and change into neutral.
 

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As someone who "bounces" between cars with stick shifts, and auto with shifter on the column, and auto with shifter out of the dash and an auto with shifter on the floor, the problem isn't adapting to the shifter's location it's the way manufacturers put things like cruise control and radio controls on opposite sides of the steering wheel...that's the bit I mess up big time-
 

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I actually prefer the buttons now and it definitely frees up some room. One unintended feature I've come to like is one step parking - I simply pull in and turn the vehicle off. The car electronically puts itself into park when it turns off.
 

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1) There is no stick getting in the way. If you need to move something across the gears, or put something in the little tray, you don't have a gear shift to work around. That may seem like a small thing, but it makes that part of the cockpit feel more open;
this. it DOES sound pretty minor, but i think this is one of best "side effects" of the buttons. i keep my phone plugged in in that front tray.

and to the OP, driving at night is no issue since the buttons are lit up.
 

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As someone who "bounces" between cars with stick shifts, and auto with shifter on the column, and auto with shifter out of the dash and an auto with shifter on the floor, the problem isn't adapting to the shifter's location it's the way manufacturers put things like cruise control and radio controls on opposite sides of the steering wheel...that's the bit I mess up big time-
I have the problem with the windshield wipers. Some cars you move the stick up, others you move it down. Kind of annoying.
 

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Anyone been driving for 50+ years have any comments on how well they adjusted to their push button transmission?
Examples, getting in an out of a parking space at night, any near-accidents in the garage, etc.



Thinking about trading in my '17 Ridgeline Blk Ed. for a Pilot, but...


TIA!
In HS 1980-81 I had a 64 Plymouth Belvedere with a pushbutton transmission. It was worth every penny of the $300 I paid for it LOL
 
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