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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I yanked #1 cylinder plug first, not only because it's the easiest to reach on the back side but also because it is one of the most likely to get VCM-ized. I took over care of this car at 96k miles so whoever had it before me took good care of it and I don't think it suffered many or any ill effects of VCM, at least not based on how the plugs look. The used plugs all gapped .039"-.040" .. .I don't know what they gapped when new. The new Rutheniums gap right at .040-.041" So I put them in stock.

I've seen all kinds of ways to get around the tight space between the engine and fans and on the rear the engine and firewall. Some vids I saw people used two short extensions or a long extension and separated it from the socket to get the socket and plug out. I took two short extensions and put a universal joint between them and I didn't have to take anything apart as the outside extension "bent' to clear the fans and firewall while still attached to the other extension and socket. Worked great.

I used a little marine anti seize good up to 2400*F and is anti galvanic and water resistant. I didn't have any dielectric grease left so I dove into my dive bag and grabbed some pure silicone grease and put a small dab around the coil seal and the plug.

In about ten years, if the Pilot and I are still around, I'll come back and let you know how the Rutheniums held up..

144602


NGK ZKR7A at 105k next to new NGK Ruthenium

144598


144600


144601
 

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Not so bad, but I'd still say you were due. Good swiveling and extending, BTW. The alternative is usually a stepladder and a gut mat over the engine.

I didn't have any dielectric grease left
I'd be happy to share since I have plenty extra, I've been told. :)


As I walked past it in the lube aisle at Canadian Tire, the siren song of the dielectric grease beckoned.

As soon as I got home I generously lubed up the whole wazoo. I feel much better now. :)
View attachment 134544
 

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So I yanked #4 cylinder plug first, not only because it's the easiest to reach but also because it is one of the most likely to get VCM-ized. I took over care of this car at 96k miles so whoever had it before me took good care of it and I don't think it suffered many or any ill effects of VCM, at least not based on how the plugs look. The used plugs all gapped .039"-.040" .. .I don't know what they gapped when new. The new Rutheniums gap right at .040-.041" So I put them in stock.

I've seen all kinds of ways to get around the tight space between the engine and fans and on the rear the engine and firewall. Some vids I saw people used two short extensions or a long extension and separated it from the socket to get the socket and plug out. I took two short extensions and put a universal joint between them and I didn't have to take anything apart as the outside extension "bent' to clear the fans and firewall while still attached to the other extension and socket. Worked great.

I used a little marine anti seize good up to 2400*F and anti galvanic and water resistant. I didn't have any dielectric grease left so I dove into my dive bag and grabbed some pure silicone grease and put a small dab around the coil seal and the plug.

In about ten years, if the Pilot and I are still around, I'll come back and let you know how the Rutheniums held up..

View attachment 144602

NGK ZKR7A at 105k next to new NGK Ruthenium

View attachment 144598

View attachment 144600

View attachment 144601
Nice write up. Great advice on the 'extension protocol' LOL
I have to do this 2 both of our Pilots, I'm waiting till it warms up though.
It was 4F this morning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Not so bad, but I'd still say you were due. Good swiveling and extending, BTW. The alternative is usually a stepladder and a gut mat over the engine.



I'd be happy to share since I have plenty extra, I've been told. :)
Looks yummie ... what is that under all the grease? I'm pretty sure dielectric grease is just another name for silicone grease (that we use on our dive gear) which I have plenty of, but thanks for offering to share yours. I got some under my nails, so now my new handle is Dielectric Nail Grease.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nice write up. Great advice on the 'extension protocol' LOL
I have to do this 2 both of our Pilots, I'm waiting till it warms up though.
It was 4F this morning.
We don't do 4F here. But it did cool way down to 67F from 80F ... perfect wrenching weather.
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100k on the plugs, it's the right thing to do. They look well baked.
 
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Looks yummie ... what is that under all the grease?
My negative car battery post, though I'll concede it's not easy to make out.

Despite how yummy it may look, you should refrain from trying to taste it. It's not the same as how I learned to test 9v batteries as a kid, with your tongue on the terminals.

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
My negative car battery post, though I'll concede it's not easy to make out.

Despite how yummy it may look, you should refrain from trying to taste it. It's not the same as how I learned to test 9v batteries as a kid, with your tongue on the terminals.

Hopefully you won't be the one that eventually has to change that battery. Did the positive terminal get the same amount of love?
 

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Hopefully you won't be the one that eventually has to change that battery. Did the positive terminal get the same amount of love?
😱 Oh no, here comes the graphic image of a positive (+) battery post connection. You asked for it. (@plplplpl will supply the image here soon)
 

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So I yanked #1 cylinder plug first, not only because it's the easiest to reach on the back side but also because it is one of the most likely to get VCM-ized. I took over care of this car at 96k miles so whoever had it before me took good care of it and I don't think it suffered many or any ill effects of VCM, at least not based on how the plugs look. The used plugs all gapped .039"-.040" .. .I don't know what they gapped when new. The new Rutheniums gap right at .040-.041" So I put them in stock.

I've seen all kinds of ways to get around the tight space between the engine and fans and on the rear the engine and firewall. Some vids I saw people used two short extensions or a long extension and separated it from the socket to get the socket and plug out. I took two short extensions and put a universal joint between them and I didn't have to take anything apart as the outside extension "bent' to clear the fans and firewall while still attached to the other extension and socket. Worked great.

I used a little marine anti seize good up to 2400*F and is anti galvanic and water resistant. I didn't have any dielectric grease left so I dove into my dive bag and grabbed some pure silicone grease and put a small dab around the coil seal and the plug.

In about ten years, if the Pilot and I are still around, I'll come back and let you know how the Rutheniums held up..

View attachment 144602

NGK ZKR7A at 105k next to new NGK Ruthenium

View attachment 144598

View attachment 144600

View attachment 144601

Oh yeah, many months ago on our 08 FWD, We had the VSA light going off, and after a 25 min. drive, it would kind of run in limp mode after that. Cool off, next drive- 254min, same.
We took it to my favorite local indy/honest shop- and had the Selenoids replaced (maybe VCM)?, it had several codes and they went with this and it fixed at all.
At this point we had always had the VCM working too. They told me- we took out the plugs- they were not the OEM plugs. I may have changed them at 60K myself, years ago.
I know they had been in there at least 100K miles, with the VCM working too.
They told me they were different than OEM plugs (didn't say which, I didn't ask)- and they said, 'they looked so good, we put them back in!
They're STILL in there today- it's now my daily driver too. Now at 188K miles. I figure they've been in there at least 120K.

I'm always amazed when an engine isn't running right- for any reason- the first thing people do is change the plugs. Whether they needed it or not! I realize it's cheap and fairly easy.

What amazes me ev3en more, is when I read/hear about someone who changes their plugs- just because (they felt like it, miles, etc.) and actually expect to see a performance increase, even after the plug they took out looked OK?
Amazes me I tell ya.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Oh yeah, many months ago on our 08 FWD, We had the VSA light going off, and after a 25 min. drive, it would kind of run in limp mode after that. Cool off, next drive- 254min, same.
We took it to my favorite local indy/honest shop- and had the Selenoids replaced (maybe VCM)?, it had several codes and they went with this and it fixed at all.
At this point we had always had the VCM working too. They told me- we took out the plugs- they were not the OEM plugs. I may have changed them at 60K myself, years ago.
I know they had been in there at least 100K miles, with the VCM working too.
They told me they were different than OEM plugs (didn't say which, I didn't ask)- and they said, 'they looked so good, we put them back in!
They're STILL in there today- it's now my daily driver too. Now at 188K miles. I figure they've been in there at least 120K.

I'm always amazed when an engine isn't running right- for any reason- the first thing people do is change the plugs. Whether they needed it or not! I realize it's cheap and fairly easy.

What amazes me ev3en more, is when I read/hear about someone who changes their plugs- just because (they felt like it, miles, etc.) and actually expect to see a performance increase, even after the plug they took out looked OK?
Amazes me I tell ya.
Well be amazed. My engine is running great, no problems that I'm aware of. I bought a set of the new Ruthenium plugs at $6 and change in case the price goes up when word gets out or they become scarce. Both have already happened. I had them sitting here not doing me any good, so I changed them out for the original ones ... whether they needed it or not. According to people who have more than my zero experience evaluating used Iridium plugs, they did need to be changed. So, I think I did the right thing.
 
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