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While driving to the grocery Saturday morning I experienced a very load bang, almost as if a window exploded from pressure. Turns out that an "Osage-Orange" Tree decided to drop one of its very large, heavy fruits on the roof of my Pilot just before the front windshield. Now I have a very sizeable dent up there.

Just wondering, since this type of tree does drop its fruits annually, should the owner of the tree be responsible for paying to fix my roof? They should be required to trim this tree back to keep the fruit from falling onto the public passageway.

Or, am I screwed? :confused:
 

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boiler1991 said:
While driving to the grocery Saturday morning I experienced a very load bang, almost as if a window exploded from pressure. Turns out that an "Osage-Orange" Tree decided to drop one of its very large, heavy fruits on the roof of my Pilot just before the front windshield. Now I have a very sizeable dent up there.

Just wondering, since this type of tree does drop its fruits annually, should the owner of the tree be responsible for paying to fix my roof? They should be required to trim this tree back to keep the fruit from falling onto the public passageway.

Or, am I screwed? :confused:
Check local laws and your comprehensive insurance.
 

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well lyou might have to prove the dent was caused by the fruit....which might be difficult.....

you comprehensive insurance should cover the damage....ofcourse hopefully you followed N_jay's advise and had $0 deductible on that :D
 

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ramirami said:
well lyou might have to prove the dent was caused by the fruit....which might be difficult.....

you comprehensive insurance should cover the damage....ofcourse hopefully you followed N_jay's advise and had $0 deductible on that :D
Actually have a $250 deductible. We'll see what the estimate is next week when I take in my Pilot. I did take digital pictures of the damage to my car, the offending tree and its fruit all over the street. Some smashed and some whole. There are probably 50+ fruit on both sides of the road and the same number smashed onto the pavement.
 

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kemosabe said:
I've been wondering what an "Osage Orange" looked like... Now I know!! :eek: :eek:
the fruit is called hedge apples

The yellow-green fruit are commonly call "hedge apples." They are produced by the Osage-orange (Maclura pomifera).

The Osage-orange is a small- to medium-sized tree. It commonly grows 30 to 40 feet tall. It typically has a short trunk and a rounded or irregular crown. The leaves of the Osage-orange are a shiny medium to dark green. They turn yellow in the fall. The twigs are buff to orange-brown and are armed with 1/2-inch long spines. The stems exude a milky sap when cut. The Osage-orange is dioecious. Male and female flowers are produced on separate trees. The small, green flowers appear in May or June. The female trees produce 3- to 5- inch-diameter fruit which ripen in September or October and fall to the ground. The "hedge apple" is an aggregate fruit composed of numerous one-seeded druplets. The Osage-orange is a member of the Mulberry or Moraceae Family. Other cultivated members of this family include the mulberry and fig.

The Osage-orange is native to a small area in eastern Texas, southeastern Oklahoma, and southwestern Arkansas. This region was also the home of the Osage Indians, hence the common name of Osage-orange. White settlers moving into the region found that the Osage-orange possessed several admirable qualities. It is a tough and durable tree, transplants easily, and tolerates poor soils, extreme heat, and strong winds. It also has no serious insect or disease problems. During the mid-nineteenth century, it was widely planted by midwest farmers, including those in southeast Nebraska, as a living fence. When pruned into a hedge, it provided an impenetrable barrier to livestock. The widespread planting of Osage-orange stopped with the introduction of barbed wire. Many of the original hedges have since been destroyed or died. However, some of the original trees can still be found in fence rows. Trees have also become naturalized in pastures and ravines.

The use of the hedge apples for insect control is one of the most enduring pest management home remedies. Placement of hedge apples around the foundation or inside the basement is claimed to provide relief from cockroaches, spiders, boxelder bugs, crickets and other pests.

The use of hedge apples as a pest solution is communicated as a folk tale complete with testimonials about apparent success. However, there is an absence of scientific research and therefore no valid evidence to confirm the claims of effectiveness. Although insect deterrent compounds have been extracted from hedge apples in laboratory studies, these do not provide a logical explanation about why hedge apples would work as claimed. At this time, there is nothing to recommend the use of hedge apples for pest control.

While the Osage-orange is hardy in southern Nebraska (USDA Hardiness Zone 5), it is not a suitable tree for the home landscape because of its large fruit and sharp thorns. Attempts have been made by horticulturists to identify and select male, thornless cultivars. Unfortunately, no cultivar has proven to be completely thornless. Until a true thornless cultivar is found, the Osage-orange is probably best suited for wildlife plantings in rural areas.

The milky juice present in the stems and fruit of the Osage-orange may cause irritation to the skin. While the fruit have been suspected of being poisonous to livestock, studies conducted in several states have been negative. However, the fruit may cause death in ruminants (like cattle and sheep) by lodging in the esophagus and preventing eructation or release of ruminal gases.
 

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ramirami said:
the fruit is called hedge apples

.
That was more than I wanted to know....



:23: :24: :23: :24:
 

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kemosabe said:
I've been wondering what an "Osage Orange" looked like... Now I know!! :eek: :eek:
Wow, looks like something you'd end up with if you didn't practice safe sex. :eek:
(Now, how in the world did this reply end up above kemosabe's first reply??)
 

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ramirami said:
well lyou might have to prove the dent was caused by the fruit....which might be difficult.....

you comprehensive insurance should cover the damage....ofcourse hopefully you followed N_jay's advise and had $0 deductible on that :D
See, I resisted bringing that up! :2: :2: :2:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I also discovered that this "Osage orange" also knocked the map light right out of its socket. Popped the cover off and put the bulb back in and it works just fine. My wife looked at the interior roof and thought that the indentation above where your head is was also caused by the perpetrator.
 

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That is one UGLY fruit! :16:

I didnt know fruit could grow hair! :eek:
 

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RipRocK said:
Wow, looks like something you'd end up with if you didn't practice safe sex. :eek:
(Now, how in the world did this reply end up above kemosabe's reply with the pic??)
I was wondering the same thing (the comment about the reply ending up in the wrong place, not the safe sex thing... :p )??? Weird...
 

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RipRocK said:
Wow, looks like something you'd end up with if you didn't practice safe sex. :eek:
(Now, how in the world did this reply end up above kemosabe's reply with the pic??)
the server clock was messed up
 
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