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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I finally got around to changing the cabin filter in my ‘03.

The removable plastic bar was still intact, I can only presume that it had the original Denso.

138296


To be honest, after 17 years and 325,000 miles - it’s actually much better than anticipated. I changed the cabin filters in all my vehicles, and this looked pristine to the one that came out of my daughters ‘08 Subie ...
 

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Nobili spiritus embiggens pequeño sparus tyre.
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this looked pristine to the one that came out of my daughters ‘08 Subie
Suibies in my area are notorious for hotboxing. :p

Good on you for getting around to your cabin air filter. You're probably happier no longer breathing 17-year-old smells.

OK, now it's time to get around to you engine air filter. :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Was your AC smelling weird?
AC hasn't worked since I bought it. I really only use the fan for about 4 months of the year, Nov - Feb. Didn't really notice any change in airflow or smell.
 

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Why the heck did they make it such a pain to change the cabin air filter. I put off changing the filter in the 2013 because I assumed it was the same way. Took me 3 minutes vs 30 in the 2008. I guess now that I’ve figured it out I can do it a little quicker now though.
 

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Why the heck did they make it such a pain to change the cabin air filter. I put off changing the filter in the 2013 because I assumed it was the same way. Took me 3 minutes vs 30 in the 2008. I guess now that I’ve figured it out I can do it a little quicker now though.
All those were intentionally made "difficult" to deter the owner from "fixing it" themselves.
Timing belt for example..... REQUIRED service, look how many hours needed to get to the parts.. and the "hourly shop rates" .

A "Piloteer" recently posted that they needed to replace a $20 plug or similar, "labor cost" from the dealer to replace the part was almost $300 ......

Car designers/manufacturers CAN design simpler ease-of-access for many parts in vehicles, but instead they make it complicated, intentionally... so they guarantee to keep themself in business.... dealers put on flimsy parts that's guaranteed to fail... and hard to access for the average citizen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Many times the engineers are also asked to build a design that only considers optimal assembly, including speed. If it saves them 30 mins in assembly time they don’t really care if it takes an extra 30 min for maintenance and/or repair..
 

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Nobili spiritus embiggens pequeño sparus tyre.
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Every time I change out that cabin air filter, a few unfiltered words escape my mouth.
138305
 

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All those were intentionally made "difficult" to deter the owner from "fixing it" themselves.
Timing belt for example..... REQUIRED service, look how many hours needed to get to the parts.. and the "hourly shop rates" .

A "piloteer" recently posted that they needed to replace a $20 plug or similar, "labor cost" from the dealer was almost $300 ......

Car designers/manufacturers CAN design simpler repair-access in vehicles, but that may put them out of "repair" business
All those were intentionally made "difficult" to deter the owner from "fixing it" themselves.
Timing belt for example..... REQUIRED service, look how many hours needed to get to the parts.. and the "hourly shop rates" .

A "piloteer" recently posted that they needed to replace a $20 plug or similar, "labor cost" from the dealer was almost $300 ......

Car designers/manufacturers CAN design simpler repair-access in vehicles, but that may put them out of "repair" business
I’ll agree that some manufacturers makes things intentionally difficult...BUT I don’t think it’s some conspiracy to keep people from working on their cars. I have no desire to do all the work on my car. Obviously dealers are going to charge a ton, but some stuff is complicated (timing belt) and I doubt there’s any way to make it easy.
 

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The engineers who design these vehicles are worried about assembly speed way before ease of access for maintenance. And there are different groups of engineers who design the engines vs. those that design the body vs. those that design the suspension so it's a miracle they coordinated as well as they did.

It's too bad the J series is likely to die, I was really looking forward to what Honda would do with the next gen V6 until the proliferation of turbo 4's.
 

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Honda has gotten better at this at least. My son's 2015 Civic cabin filter can be accessed by opening the glove box and squeezing the sides together. On the other hand, getting at the filter in my 2016 Nissan is worse than my 2004 Pilot.
 

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Okay, I guess I am at a loss here.

My 2013 Pilot and my 2020 Passport cabin air filters have the same location and change procedure. Now granted for some people a glove box is a purse or second purse, which may take some time to empty out, but pushing in the back of the glove box corners to drop the glove box out of the way and then pushing two tabs to pull the filter tray and filter out really isn't that much of a job. This is pretty typical for many manufactures.

Of course Mercedes is not a typical manufacturer, that's why for them you have to drop the foot space kick panel under the glove box to get to the cabin filter. BMW is even more fun as they separate the large cabin air filter, under the hood at the firewall, and the micro filter, under the dash. Both require a few tools and some time. Ah the marvels of German engineering.
 

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Okay, I guess I am at a loss here.

My 2013 Pilot and my 2020 Passport cabin air filters have the same location and change procedure. Now granted for some people a glove box is a purse or second purse, which may take some time to empty out, but pushing in the back of the glove box corners to drop the glove box out of the way and then pushing two tabs to pull the filter tray and filter out really isn't that much of a job. This is pretty typical for many manufactures.

Of course Mercedes is not a typical manufacturer, that's why for them you have to drop the foot space kick panel under the glove box to get to the cabin filter. BMW is even more fun as they separate the large cabin air filter, under the hood at the firewall, and the micro filter, under the dash. Both require a few tools and some time. Ah the marvels of German engineering.
The first gen had a much more difficult procedure. My dad hated doing it to my mom's first gen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I followed the sticky on this forum and it took me about 20 minutes. However, I changed the cabin filter in my wife's Subie Impreza and it took me less than 5 minutes, and that includes using the shop vac and cleaning.

The only change I made from the sticky was I used a utility knife with a new blade to cut through the plastic, for me it much quicker than a saw and for my large hands much easier than side cutters. Half the 20 mins was using the shop vac and crevice tool to clean out the compartment and then taking some towels with minerals spirits to clean out the grime, which was pretty noticeable.
 

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Wow, 325,000 miles! The fan should be happy it doesn't have to work as hard moving air through a new filter. On a side note, I had my timing belt replaced at 61,000 and 17yrs and it was in surprisingly good visual shape. No dry rot at all.
 

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I followed the sticky on this forum and it took me about 20 minutes. However, I changed the cabin filter in my wife's Subie Impreza and it took me less than 5 minutes, and that includes using the shop vac and cleaning.

The only change I made from the sticky was I used a utility knife with a new blade to cut through the plastic, for me it much quicker than a saw and for my large hands much easier than side cutters. Half the 20 mins was using the shop vac and crevice tool to clean out the compartment and then taking some towels with minerals spirits to clean out the grime, which was pretty noticeable.
that is quite impressively considering the age. Another recommendation for you, if you have not already done so, clean the fan screen for the rear blower. It’s located on the driver’s side of the center console/transmission tunnel. I’ve seen several posts here on how to do it.

-Mike
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
that is quite impressively considering the age. Another recommendation for you, if you have not already done so, clean the fan screen for the rear blower. It’s located on the driver’s side of the center console/transmission tunnel. I’ve seen several posts here on how to do it.

-Mike
Yeah, it's on my list but way down there. I only have rear passengers in my Pilot about 10x a year, and with no AC, its definitely only advantageous for the winter months. I'm at the end of remodeling my kitchen and other summer house projects (deck staining, etc.) which requires me to squeeze in car maintenance/repairs during down time or as needed.
 

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The first gen had a much more difficult procedure. My dad hated doing it to my mom's first gen.
Were 2 generations out now and there are people complaining about engineers, designs and intentionally making it hard to do things etc.

Simple solution, make your vehicle retro to pre 1995 vehicles and take it out. (They really didn't take off in the US until 2000) No problem changing them then. I find it humorous, especially since this was in the funny pages today.

138319
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Wow, 325,000 miles! The fan should be happy it doesn't have to work as hard moving air through a new filter. On a side note, I had my timing belt replaced at 61,000 and 17yrs and it was in surprisingly good visual shape. No dry rot at all.
I'm not surprised. When I lived in the Caribbean the car (mostly Hondas and Subies) were shipped direct from Japan, and major maintenance was always performed based on mileage. Serpentine belts are also typically changed by mileage, not time.

Personally, I think the 'time' factor (for timing belts) was added specifically for America as a result and/or proactive measure to deal with lawsuits.

I'm not a chemist, but I do have a large amount of training in chemistry, and for the life of me I can't understand how an unexposed timing belt would suffer any kind of rot or be affected by time alone. Modern belts are made of hard composite rubber with internal high-tensile strength carbon or kevlar fibers, which on their own take decades to break down.
 
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