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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
TLDR: the comma 2 installs and works well on the 2020 pilot.

Recently purchased a 2020 pilot touring edition. We do a lot of road trips to races, so autonomous driving features were a top priority during my car search. There is no Tesla I like or that I can afford, so that brought me to OpenPilot and the Comma 2.

While there was no confirmed compatibility with the 2020 pilot, the 2017 and newer pilots are all compatible, so I crossed my fingers and went for it.

The goal was to have a spacious ride with three rows of seating (three kids), a trailer hitch for a bike rack, and self driving, especially on road trips.

The comma 2 dev kit arrived within a week of ordering it.

The ACC camera housing on the pilot has plenty of room for the OpenPilot hardware and was easy to remove and reattach.

the devkit comes with a length of RJ45 cable that runs from the comma 2 to your ODB2 port. It’s a long flat cable that hides very easily. You wouldn’t know it was in my pilot if I didn’t tell you. No part of the pilot’s interior had to be removed or even shifted much. The only visible wire is the usb-c cable running from the mirror to the comma 2.

the comma 2 is mounted with a go pro mount just below your mirror, centered on your wind shield. The pilot windshield is tall and wide enough that it doesn’t bother you.
There is still a ton of visibility.

This does not need to be a review of the open pilot system. I would only say that the difference between Honda sensing lane tracing and open pilot is massive. Open pilot just feels like someone is intelligently driving and steering your car. It is very, very impressive. The addition of the screen with the road lines, etc., add a sense of security to the experience.

An area where it comes up short is stop and go driving. The open pilot system is limited by the capabilities of the car, so because the pilot’s cruise control will not go below 25 mph, open pilot will not, either. In practice, it seems to work down to about 10 mph, but it will not go as far as the stop and go driving features that a Tesla has.

Other models, such as the civic, which will do adaptive cruise control down to a stop, stop and go is possible with open pilot.

So, summary.
install: Easy. 10/10.
daily use: depends on your driving habits. If you have a mindless commute every day, it’s life changing. If you are driving 10 minutes with red lights, turns, etc., it is less useful.
road trips: totally amazing. We drive to Ironman races, so the trips can be two or more days of driving, and I can’t wait to let open pilot handle it for me. It’s fantastic on the interstate.
happy to answer any questions.
 

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So just in theory this whole thing operates by monitoring the lanes so what happens when the lane disappears around a bend? the Pilot will think to go straight while your waking up from a slumber sleep you get to experience watching the pilot going over the cliff first hand. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
openpilot operates by 1. monitoring lanes and lane lines and 2. machine learning re: roads, cars, objects, etc.
all of your drive data is uploaded and added to the data set, just like Tesla.

from testing for a few weeks on different road types, OpenPilot does not need lane lines. it will center you on a one lane road with no lines at all, and it will continue through line-less areas on multiple lane roads, just making its best guess as to where you want to go. you take control when you don't like what it is doing. that's level 2 vs level 3 and up autonomous driving, I think.

there is a torque limit on steering, which I think is unique to each car manufacturer. so, what happens if the road disappears around a bend (or if the road is just too bendy for the car's steering torque) is OpenPilot prompts you to take control.

it is never subtle about this. you absolutely know when it wants you to take over.

I would summarize OP by saying that it eliminates the tedious parts of your drive, while you still handle the complicated stuff.

So just in theory this whole thing operates by monitoring the lanes so what happens when the lane disappears around a bend? the Pilot will think to go straight while your waking up from a slumber sleep you get to experience watching the pilot going over the cliff first hand. :)
 

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An area where it comes up short is stop and go driving. The open pilot system is limited by the capabilities of the car, so because the pilot’s cruise control will not go below 25 mph, open pilot will not, either. In practice, it seems to work down to about 10 mph, but it will not go as far as the stop and go driving features that a Tesla has.

Other models, such as the civic, which will do adaptive cruise control down to a stop, stop and go is possible with open pilot.
Reviving an old thread here because I'm looking to get the Comma 2 for my 2017 Pilot Elite... Have you looked into the Comma Pedal which is AFAIK more technically involved but should be able to overcome this issue?

I'm hesitant about the Comma Pedal because I can't find anything on it more recent than 2018.
Anyone have any more recent experience "building" or buying and installing one on a Pilot 2017+.
 

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openpilot operates by 1. monitoring lanes and lane lines and 2. machine learning re: roads, cars, objects, etc.
all of your drive data is uploaded and added to the data set, just like Tesla.

from testing for a few weeks on different road types, OpenPilot does not need lane lines. it will center you on a one lane road with no lines at all, and it will continue through line-less areas on multiple lane roads, just making its best guess as to where you want to go. you take control when you don't like what it is doing. that's level 2 vs level 3 and up autonomous driving, I think.

there is a torque limit on steering, which I think is unique to each car manufacturer. so, what happens if the road disappears around a bend (or if the road is just too bendy for the car's steering torque) is OpenPilot prompts you to take control.

it is never subtle about this. you absolutely know when it wants you to take over.

I would summarize OP by saying that it eliminates the tedious parts of your drive, while you still handle the complicated stuff.
Does it know when you've fallen asleep?
 
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