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I have some leftover transfer case fluid (Hypoid gear oil API GL4) that I bought from Honda dealership. It’s been sitting in my garage fir 3 years. Is it still good or should I just buy it new?

This is for my 2014 Pilot, thank you.
 

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Its fine.

 
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I'd buy new if this is for a scheduled maintenance. Especially if it's been opened. That oil will be in your vehicle an additional 3 years before your next service?
 

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Brake fluid is hygroscopic, but is hypoid gear oil?

Heck, I just ate some frozen hash browns from two years ago. :sick:
 

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IMO use the "new" 3yr GL-4 if unopened. Drain it in a few years. Think about all those Pilots running around with original GL-4 and doing fine.
 

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There are a few things that amaze me, and putting a use-by date on something like gear oil may be one of them. It sits in a relatively severe environment in service, with no date-driven replacement interval stated. But in a sealed/unopened bottle on a shelf in my garage, in a warehouse, or on display at the parts store, it deteriorates at a faster and predictable rate.

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A decade or more ago, a news article popped up about a FEMA dilemma in central Florida. Apparently, they had decided after Katrina that they needed to stage truckloads of ice in susceptible areas, ready to go into service on short notice. The problem? The company that packed the ice had printed a use-by date on the bags. Plus it could only be distributed to legitimate government aid agencies... who couldn't keep it past the use-by date. One of my clients operates a power plant within a few miles of the warehouse where the ice was stored in refrigerated trailers. They have a cooling pond where they pump cooling water, let it cool off from evaporation, then return it for another cycle. Seemed like a great place to put that ice to work, but since they weren't a relief agency, no ken dew. Solution? Shut off the reefer units and let it melt and run outside onto the ground.

Back to basics though.... What causes a bag of ice to need a use-by date? Does ice get freezer burn? (no...) I'm sure there's a government spec for disaster ice that includes stuff like this, something that keeps a truckload or fifty of WalMart ice from meeting their standard.

Back to your regular thread browsing....
 
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There are a few things that amaze me, and putting a use-by date on something like gear oil may be one of them. It sits in a relatively severe environment in service, with no date-driven replacement interval stated. But in a sealed/unopened bottle on a shelf in my garage, in a warehouse, or on display at the parts store, it deteriorates at a faster and predictable rate.

-----
A decade or more ago, a news article popped up about a FEMA dilemma in central Florida. Apparently, they had decided after Katrina that they needed to stage truckloads of ice in susceptible areas, ready to go into service on short notice. The problem? The company that packed the ice had printed a use-by date on the bags. Plus it could only be distributed to legitimate government aid agencies... who couldn't keep it past the use-by date. One of my clients operates a power plant within a few miles of the warehouse where the ice was stored in refrigerated trailers. They have a cooling pond where they pump cooling water, let it cool off from evaporation, then return it for another cycle. Seemed like a great place to put that ice to work, but since they weren't a relief agency, no ken dew. Solution? Shut off the reefer units and let it melt and run outside onto the ground.

Back to basics though.... What causes a bag of ice to need a use-by date? Does ice get freezer burn? (no...) I'm sure there's a government spec for disaster ice that includes stuff like this, something that keeps a truckload or fifty of WalMart ice from meeting their standard.

Back to your regular thread browsing....
I know synthetic oil deteriorates. Opened an old bottle of Valvoline 5w30 and it smelled like turpentine. It was 5 + years old. It gets pretty hot in my garage in the summer time.

Ice I would think you would need to use quickly. Freezer taste.
 
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There are a few things that amaze me, and putting a use-by date on something like gear oil may be one of them. It sits in a relatively severe environment in service, with no date-driven replacement interval stated. But in a sealed/unopened bottle on a shelf in my garage, in a warehouse, or on display at the parts store, it deteriorates at a faster and predictable rate.
Hmmm...interesting...found out my Dad kept a stash of new sealed 5W30 motor oil quarts in the basement for the past 20 years. I thought about using them in my tractor or beater cars but have not due to unsubstantiated concerns (i do care about my beaters). Motor oil has survived beyond the age of the dinosaurs and should be fine but I suspect old motor oil could become clumpy or moldy. Only one way to find out or perhaps a chemist/bio chem forum member will chime in...lol
 

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Hmmm...interesting...found out my Dad kept a stash of new sealed 5W30 motor oil quarts in the basement for the past 20 years. Motor oil has survived beyond the age of the dinosaurs and should be fine but I suspect old motor oil could become clumpy or moldy. Only one way to find out or perhaps a chemist/bio chem forum member will chime in...lol
Send some of it to Blackstone for an oil analysis and the rest of it to Project Farm:

 

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I know synthetic oil deteriorates. Opened an old bottle of Valvoline 5w30 and it smelled like turpentine. It was 5 + years old. It gets pretty hot in my garage in the summer time
I don't usually smell the oil :) as I pour the oil into the engine but I had a similar occurrence. I used 5 separate quart bottles and one had a different color and pour-ability. Initially I thought someone had sold me some bad used oil but it was the quart that was always left behind in my stockpile oil reserves. Today I date my oil purchases and diligently rotate my oil stockpile reserves.
 

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I don't usually smell the oil :) as I pour the oil into the engine but I had a similar occurrence. I used 5 separate quart bottles and one had a different color and pour-ability. Initially I thought someone had sold me some bad used oil but it was the quart that was always left behind in my stockpile oil reserves. Today I date my oil purchases and diligently rotate my oil stockpile reserves.
I was just going to top off the old riding lawn mower with it, (ya, i know its not the right viscosity) As I poured it, a blob plopped out of the bottle. I knew then something wasn't right. Took a whiff of it then and got the turpentine smell. Found some other not so old oil and finished the lawn. Lol
Did an oil change before the next mowing. ¯\(ツ)
 
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I've been using Mobil 5000 that my grandfather gave my dad at least 10 years ago in my '61 Impala... no weird smells I have good pressure I have no complaints and will continue to use it. I change it once a year.
 

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Nice car.
Wish I had my 67 El Camino back.
 

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Nice car.
Wish I had my 67 El Camino back.
I'm meh on the later El Caminos... give me a '59... cat eye taillights, fins and the roof spoiler... I think I need to go clean myself up now please excuse me.

134594
 
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Unfortunately the quest for mileage has forced every car and SUV to look more or less the same.

Just don't show my wife this video or she will never let one of my children get in my Impala.

 

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I'm meh on the later El Caminos... give me a '59... cat eye taillights, fins and the roof spoiler... I think I need to go clean myself up now please excuse me.

View attachment 134594
Well ya, but the 67 was my first car, 283 engine with 3 on the tree. It was paid for and mine. But with a baby on the way and bills to pay, I did what I had to do. Wife and a car seat wasn't going to work. I couldn't afford 2 cars.
 

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Well ya, but the 67 was my first car, 283 engine with 3 on the tree. It was paid for and mine. But with a baby on the way and bills to pay, I did what I had to do. Wife and a car seat wasn't going to work. I couldn't afford 2 cars.
My Impala is running a 283 with a 3 on the tree... unsynchronized 1st gear... you think you know how to drive a manual until you drive that thing.

I guess lucky for me the Impala came into my life after the 1st child and it's been the only untouchable possession of mine in our relationship. I haven't put much money into it, everything associated with the brakes (except for the pedal) is new with front disks, a power booster and dual reservoir master cylinder. Otherwise I maintain, fix what breaks and drive it early on weekend mornings while the kids are asleep and before the idiot drivers come out.
 
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....

Ice I would think you would need to use quickly. Freezer taste.
What we know as "freezer burn" and the related/resultant taste are a byproduct of modern home "frost-free" refrigerator/freezers. To avoid having moisture condense and freeze on stuff stored cold inside, there's a defrost cycle that involves periodic use of some heating elements and running the circulating fan. The warmer air evaporates the condensed and frozen moisture after it thaws the surfaces of the freezer and the food inside. The repeated thawing and refreezing causes water near the food surfaces to reform new crystals every time this cycle happens, each time puling moisture from the surface area and just below. Well-sealed packages have mushy surfaces when thawed thanks to the repeated rebuilding of the crystalline structure. Ice cream is a favorite example for me, as you get a combination of hard crystalline layers with a gooey gelatin underneath after a series of thaws and refreezes. Mrs dr bob likes her ice cream softer, so she pulls it from the freezer and lets it sit out some before serving. Not Good. I stock separate cartons of ice cream for myself and guests, and keep it loosely paper double-bagged in the freezer. The extra insulation of the air between the bag layers keeps it from thawing during defrost cycles, so six month old cartons have the same taste and texture as new.

In the case of the stored ice in Florida, it was in refrigerated trailers that were well sealed and no defrost cycles. Couldn't really get any defrost action in a space and mass that big, and just one reefer unit. The bags that come out after two years are identical by texture and appearance to the "new" bags that go in. The only difference is the use-by date.

FWIW, it's a lot cheaper and easier to run ice plants on demand rather than trying to store truckloads of ice for years. Were I the FEMA boss in Florida, nawlins or Houston for instance, I'd have standing contracts in place with Wal-Mart to generate and distribute ice to an affected area on demand. They've demonstrated in the past that they have a much better prediction, response and recovery machine already in place. It's a well tuned logistics system, depending only on being able to get the trucks to their destinations without risk of hijacking.

Back to old cars and old oil.

I still have a few cardboard oil cans with Valvoline Racing 50, in a display with one of those now-antique chromed fill spouts that punctures the cans. The 50 yo cans don't leak. No telling the status of the contents. Viscosity is about the same as 90W gear oil, maybe a little thicker. No air-cooled race cars left in the fleet, so no reason to open the cans. Maybe send it to the Ashland Museum for posteriority. :D
 
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