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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So, I haven’t seen any other fault codes after changing my fuel injectors.
But, I was monitoring my fuel trims today and bank 2 still showing a bit low on the negative side.
is there a possibility the reason is my pcv system?
when I changed the injectors I remember seeing a puddle of oil that the intake manifold left on the ground. As far as I know, there shouldn’t be oil in the intake manifold. Is that corrrect?
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Oil should not be in the intake and the only way it can is through the PCV line as far as I know. Oil vapours carry over and condense when they hit the cooler air in the manifold. This will cause carbon buildup on the intake valves. Might be time for a PCV catch can or a switch to a less volatile engine oil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Oil should not be in the intake and the only way it can is through the PCV line as far as I know. Oil vapours carry over and condense when they hit the cooler air in the manifold. This will cause carbon buildup on the intake valves. Might be time for a PCV catch can or a switch to a less volatile engine oil.
Yeah that’s what I thought. I had an Audi I had to install a catch can. But that one Ended Up having bad piston rings. I hope this is not the case.
I’m in the process of figuring out my VCM disabler and keep finding new issues.
now my coolant keeps disappearing as well with no obvious leaks anywhere.
I have no clue what’s going on with this lemon.
 

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First replace the PVC valve and clean the intake manifold. Drive it a couple of days and check it. No oil problem solved. Block PVC replaced.

If you do have oil then you probably have a blocked oil passage. That potentially can be a more serious problem. You can do an oil flush to try and open the passage. Follow the instructions on the oil flush product you choose.

If this does not solve the problem it may be mechanic time either at a trusted mechanic or yourself if you feel confident to do the work.

A small film of oil in the intake manifold is not much of an issue, but a puddle is another more serious matter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeap. Sounds like a plan. Ill start with the pcv valve and see what happens.
thanks for the advice ya’ll.
 

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You are using a VCM disabler?
It can be difficult to know its working on a 3rd Gen. By your scanner you can see if your engine temp defaulted. (You probably know this.)
I'd also clean the (MAF) with some CRC Electronic Cleaner or MAF Cleaner and make sure my intake tube is clamped on tight with no leaks. (You may know this too.)
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You are using a VCM disabler?
It can be difficult to know its working on a 3rd Gen. By your scanner you can see if your engine temp defaulted. (You probably know this.)
I'd also clean the (MAF) with some CRC Electronic Cleaner or MAF Cleaner and make sure my intake tube is clamped on tight with no leaks. (You may know this too.)
Thanks for the info, I still haven't installed the vcm disabler yet. I didn't clean the maf sensor but I will do that. I checked the intake hose like u suggested. Couldn't see anything out of the normal.only thing is the clamp is pretty loose. I can squeeze it with my fingers. Ill probably replace it just in case.
 

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Thanks for the info, I still haven't installed the vcm disabler yet. I didn't clean the maf sensor but I will do that. I checked the intake hose like u suggested. Couldn't see anything out of the normal.only thing is the clamp is pretty loose. I can squeeze it with my fingers. Ill probably replace it just in case.
Tighten the clamp and your MAF reading will read less. Do you have your MAF number saved?
 
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Oil can get into the intake manifold due to:

-excessive blow-by (worn rings) forces too much oil vapor past the PCV
-oil level too high in crankcase, oil froth generated, goes thru PCV
-air cleaner is clogged, so excess vacuum is applied to PCV line
-high heat/high rev driving generates more oil vapor
-fuel contamination of crankcase oil creates gas/oil vapor which condenses in manifold.
-PCV stuck open, allows too much crankcase vapor into manifold

IMHO, avoid using crankcase flush products. A regular oil change is all the flush that you need. Just my 2$ worth. (Inflation has made 2 cents worth passe'.)
 

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Oil can get into the intake manifold due to:

-excessive blow-by (worn rings) forces too much oil vapor past the PCV
-oil level too high in crankcase, oil froth generated, goes thru PCV
-air cleaner is clogged, so excess vacuum is applied to PCV line
-high heat/high rev driving generates more oil vapor
-fuel contamination of crankcase oil creates gas/oil vapor which condenses in manifold.
-PCV stuck open, allows too much crankcase vapor into manifold

IMHO, avoid using crankcase flush products. A regular oil change is all the flush that you need. Just my 2$ worth. (Inflation has made 2 cents worth passe'.)
But how will that clear a blocked oil passage? Theres only two ways I know of. 1 a oil system flush product and 2 tear it down and clean it.
 

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But how will that clear a blocked oil passage? Theres only two ways I know of. 1 a oil system flush product and 2 tear it down and clean it.
I guess that I don't understand what you mean by a blocked oil passage causing oil in the manifold. Please clarify this for me, I'm not sure what you mean.
 

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There are oil passages in the engine to distribute oil throughout the engine, including things like the cams, lifters etc. If one or some of those passages get blocked the internal pressure will vent through the PVC in and into the intake manifold. If it gets too bad you are looking at a worn cam(s) lifters etc and doing a complete head job at the least.
 

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There are oil passages in the engine to distribute oil throughout the engine, including things like the cams, lifters etc. If one or some of those passages get blocked the internal pressure will vent through the PVC in and into the intake manifold. If it gets too bad you are looking at a worn cam(s) lifters etc and doing a complete head job at the least.
I'm still confused with this explanation. In every engine that I have torn down, the oil pump drives the oil thru the filter to feed the galleys and passages to feed the main bearings, rod bearings, lifters, cam bearings, and rocker arms. Some engines also have oil squirters to splash the cylinder walls as well. All the oil that flows from these pressurized systems falls back into the sump, to be picked up by the pump, repressurized, refiltered, and goes to lube everything again.

The PCV valve allows crankcase vapors to be drawn into the intake manifold and burned in the combustion chamber. It has nothing to do with pressurized engine oil passages.

In today's modern engines with high quality detergent oil, the oil passages just don't get blocked, unless the car has been sitting in a vacant lot for a few years. If your Honda J35 engine actually had a blocked oil passage, you are probably looking at a new or rebuilt engine. Change your oil and filter regularly to avoid these problems. It just doesn't happen if you give the engine proper regular maintenance. And it has nothing to do with the PCV valve.
 

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I'm still confused with this explanation. In every engine that I have torn down, the oil pump drives the oil thru the filter to feed the galleys and passages to feed the main bearings, lifters, cam bearings, and rocker arms. Some engines also have oil squirters to splash the cylinder walls as well. All the oil that flows from these pressurized systems falls back into the sump, to be picked up by the pump, repressurized, refiltered, and goes to lube everything again.

The PCV valve allows crankcase vapors to be drawn into the intake manifold and burned in the combustion chamber. It has nothing to do with pressurized engine oil passages.

In today's modern engines with high quality detergent oil, the oil passages just don't get blocked, unless the car has been sitting in a vacant lot for a few years. If your Honda J35 engine actually had a blocked oil passage, you are probably looking at a new or rebuilt engine. Change your oil and filter regularly to avoid these problems. It just doesn't happen if you give the engine proper regular maintenance. And it has nothing to do with the PCV valve.
I think you answered you own question without knowing it.

"The oil pump drives the oil thru the filter to feed the galleys and passages to feed the main bearings, lifters, cam bearings, and rocker arms."

And yes even with modern engines the can and do get blocked. You make the assumption that everyone changes their oil with top quality synthetic oil on time every time, as well as doing every single maintenance item on the list when they should.

If that were true, then companies like BMW and others wouldn't include as part of their leases necessary service. They did so because people would lease a BMW, not do the required service usually do to the high costs, and then turn it in at the end of the lease. BMW would then sell these cars and they took a beating on them when people started having serious engine problems.
 

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I think you answered you own question without knowing it.

"The oil pump drives the oil thru the filter to feed the galleys and passages to feed the main bearings, lifters, cam bearings, and rocker arms."

And yes even with modern engines the can and do get blocked. You make the assumption that everyone changes their oil with top quality synthetic oil on time every time, as well as doing every single maintenance item on the list when they should.

If that were true, then companies like BMW and others wouldn't include as part of their leases necessary service. They did so because people would lease a BMW, not do the required service usually do to the high costs, and then turn it in at the end of the lease. BMW would then sell these cars and they took a beating on them when people started having serious engine problems.
Simple answer here. PCV vents crankcase vapors. Is not connected to oil system. Nothing to do with clogged oil passages. You are mixing up two completely different systems. Call up your old high school auto shop teacher (if you had one), and he will set you straight.
 

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YES it vents crankcase vapors. Rusty oil and sludge will accumulate in your oil passage once you fail to change the engine oil. If the oil cannot easily pass over the passage or the passage has been extremely blocked, then the oil will go over your PCV valve. Eventually, the oil will go to the air intake manifold.

If you never change the oil in your car, it will collect sludge and deposits and leave them in the oil passage. When oil cannot pass freely through the passage, it gathers inside the top of the cylinder head.

When the passage is totally blocked, the oil will go through the PCV valve and enter the air intake manifold. What you have to do to get rid of this problem is to pour an engine flush formula into the oil and run the engine for a few times. When the buildup is cleared, change the engine oil and don’t forget to replace the air filter. If it does not solve the issue, take the help of a professional mechanic.

Blocked oil passages – This is also one of the most common reasons for oil in the intake manifold. When the normal passages for the oil become blocked, the oil redirects and flows through the positive crankcase valve hose into the intake manifold.

#Clogged Oil passage
Sludge and rusty oil will be deposited in the oil passage if you don’t change your engine oil in time. When oil can’t pass through the passage freely, or the passage is fully blocked, the oil goes through the PVC valve and the oil goes to the air intake manifold at last.
 

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YES it vents crankcase vapors. Rusty oil and sludge will accumulate in your oil passage once you fail to change the engine oil. If the oil cannot easily pass over the passage or the passage has been extremely blocked, then the oil will go over your PCV valve. Eventually, the oil will go to the air intake manifold.

If you never change the oil in your car, it will collect sludge and deposits and leave them in the oil passage. When oil cannot pass freely through the passage, it gathers inside the top of the cylinder head.

When the passage is totally blocked, the oil will go through the PCV valve and enter the air intake manifold. What you have to do to get rid of this problem is to pour an engine flush formula into the oil and run the engine for a few times. When the buildup is cleared, change the engine oil and don’t forget to replace the air filter. If it does not solve the issue, take the help of a professional mechanic.

Blocked oil passages – This is also one of the most common reasons for oil in the intake manifold. When the normal passages for the oil become blocked, the oil redirects and flows through the positive crankcase valve hose into the intake manifold.

#Clogged Oil passage
Sludge and rusty oil will be deposited in the oil passage if you don’t change your engine oil in time. When oil can’t pass through the passage freely, or the passage is fully blocked, the oil goes through the PVC valve and the oil goes to the air intake manifold at last.
What the heck are you smoking? You can spin it a million times to Sunday, but the Positive Crankcase Ventilation system is not connected to the pressurized oil lubrication system of your engine! I'm not trying to flame you, buddy, but you are just full of sh*t.
 

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What the heck are you smoking? You can spin it a million times to Sunday, but the Positive Crankcase Ventilation system is not connected to the pressurized oil lubrication system of your engine! I'm not trying to flame you, buddy, but you are just full of sh*t.
Did you read any of the articles I linked to or are all of those mechanics also full of sh*t? Just because you have never seen it doesn't mean it doesn't happen.
 

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Did you read any of the articles I linked to or are all of those mechanics also full of sh*t? Just because you have never seen it doesn't mean it doesn't happen.
Dalton: In your house, I dare say that the toilet is not connected to the furnace.

I don't have to read your links.

PCV ain't connected to oil pressure. If you can't get the concept here, I don't know how to make it more clear.
 
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