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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I changed my front brakes one of the caliper slide pin boots was a little torn. I added some grease and decided I'd worry about it later. I've been noticing a few weird things recently.

The brakes are of noisy when I first press the pedal in, almost like things just aren't moving as smoothly as they should. I plan on replacing the pins and the boots and re-lubing everything too.

When I have to do a panic stop, it doesn't seem like the ABS is working. I know what it should feel like and I haven't felt that, it more seems like the brakes aren't fully engaging. Again, I assume making sure the slide pins are in good condition will fix this.

Should I replace the brake fluid as well? I suppose it's possible I'd need a new caliper too? Any suggestions? It makes me nervous driving on wet roads when traffic is heavy. This car is too heavy to not feel confident when it comes to stopping.
 

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When I changed my front brakes one of the caliper slide pin boots was a little torn. I added some grease and decided I'd worry about it later. I've been noticing a few weird things recently.

The brakes are of noisy when I first press the pedal in, almost like things just aren't moving as smoothly as they should. I plan on replacing the pins and the boots and re-lubing everything too.

When I have to do a panic stop, it doesn't seem like the ABS is working. I know what it should feel like and I haven't felt that, it more seems like the brakes aren't fully engaging. Again, I assume making sure the slide pins are in good condition will fix this.

Should I replace the brake fluid as well? I suppose it's possible I'd need a new caliper too? Any suggestions? It makes me nervous driving on wet roads when traffic is heavy. This car is too heavy to not feel confident when it comes to stopping.
If the slide pins are working properly, brake pads are good, moving up from there leaves the caliper pistons, brake fluid and master cylinder. If the old brake fluid has never been purged from the system, that would be a good thing to do first.
If your caliper pistons are sticking, then you could buy new ones or use a piston rebuild kit.
I had to replace a master cylinder at about 165k miles. Had zero brake pedal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If the slide pins are working properly, brake pads are good, moving up from there leaves the caliper pistons, brake fluid and master cylinder. If the old brake fluid has never been purged from the system, that would be a good thing to do first.
If your caliper pistons are sticking, then you could buy new ones or use a piston rebuild kit.
I had to replace a master cylinder at about 165k miles. Had zero brake pedal.
The slide pins aren't working right now, but I will fix that and probably do the fluid too. Then I'll see what happens from there I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Would there be any benefit to sucking all the fluid out of the reservoir and then topping it off? I'm not interested in trying to bleed everything right now. If I were to do that every couple thousand miles would I eventually get new-ish fluid in there?
 

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Would there be any benefit to sucking all the fluid out of the reservoir and then topping it off? I'm not interested in trying to bleed everything right now. If I were to do that every couple thousand miles would I eventually get new-ish fluid in there?
It wouldn't hurt. I don't know if it would help.
 

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Would there be any benefit to sucking all the fluid out of the reservoir and then topping it off? I'm not interested in trying to bleed everything right now. If I were to do that every couple thousand miles would I eventually get new-ish fluid in there?
I have done similar approach in the past, but can assure you it's not the best one.

Because when you'll bleed from actual bleeders, you'll see 'green or a unique color' brake fluid coming out, while reservoir was seemingly okay, so at least for me it wasn't the right 'bleeding' and no impact on brake pedal performance either.

YMMV
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have done similar approach in the past, but can assure you it's not the best one.

Because when you'll bleed from actual bleeders, you'll see 'green or a unique color' brake fluid coming out, while reservoir was seemingly okay, so at least for me it wasn't the right 'bleeding' and no impact on brake pedal performance either.

YMMV
Ok, I've been watching some videos on bleeding brakes and I don't feel too confident doing it. Maybe I'm psyching myself out.
 

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Ok, I've been watching some videos on bleeding brakes and I don't feel too confident doing it. Maybe I'm psyching myself out.
You are. Very simple.
I'd do as you said first. Draw out the fluid in the reservoir and pour on new. Then with someone to pump brakes and hold pedal, open the valve fluid will push out. The person helping you should hold the pedal on the floor until you tighten valve back. They should pump the brakes and hold...(repeat). This should be done a few times until you see clean fluid coming out. Just be sure to keep the reservoir filled with fluid so as not to draw air into the lines. Start with Left Front, Right Front, Right Rear, Left Rear in this order.
 

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Start with Left Front, Right Front, Right Rear, Left Rear in this order.
I've had to have that "conversation" with every mechanic. Still looking for some confirmation that the Service Manual might be wrong. Otherwise, that's the way I'll keep doing it.
 

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I've had to have that "conversation" with every mechanic. Still looking for some confirmation that the Service Manual might be wrong. Otherwise, that's the way I'll keep doing it.
Thanks for confirming how I've known for years.
 

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Would there be any benefit to sucking all the fluid out of the reservoir and then topping it off? I'm not interested in trying to bleed everything right now. If I were to do that every couple thousand miles would I eventually get new-ish fluid in there?
The only benefit of sucking out the brake reservoir is you will get some new-ish fluid in the mix. The bad thing for your brake system is you won't clear out the older dirty likely contaminated fluid sometimes with debris.
 

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I've had to have that "conversation" with every mechanic. Still looking for some confirmation that the Service Manual might be wrong. Otherwise, that's the way I'll keep doing it.
When you have the "conversation" you might get varying opinions on Honda-friendly caliper pin lube that won't cause any issues. Poll worthy?
 

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John Vought, iffy about bleeding his brakes? Oh yeah, this is Jack!

Easy Peasy. Several ways to do it.

Just don't suck any air in the system from either end before closing the zerk fitting.
I recently did my fronts, and used an old empty bottle and a piece of clear tubing- which fits tightly over the nipple. put the other end in the bottom of the bottle and start pumping. Air goes out, but does not make it back in the end after enough fluid in the bottle covers the end, so bubbles only come out and no air back up and in.

You can't spend some $$ and get those vacuum things for this to suck the fluid through too.
I don't- old school I guess. When you pump enough new fluid thru the lines, you've essentially changed the brake fluid.
 

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On the other hand, I'll step into our forum Debbie Downer's shoes for a moment and say that even a brake bleed job can go south if just one of your bleeder valves is rusty or damaged. I now have a little sandwich bag with some backup bleeder valves. :( That's all I’m going to say about it, so you'll have to channel Paul Harvey if you want... the rest of the story.

Good day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
On the other hand, I'll step into our forum Debbie Downer's shoes for a moment and say that even a brake bleed job can go south if just one of your bleeder valves is rusty or damaged. I now have a little sandwich bag with some backup bleeder valves. :( That's all I’m going to say about it, so you'll have to channel Paul Harvey if you want... the rest of the story.

Good day.
I'll keep this in mind although there is not even one spec of rust on this car. The number of times this car has been driven in the snow could be counted on 1 hand.
 

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When you have the "conversation" you might get varying opinions on Honda-friendly caliper pin lube that won't cause any issues. Poll worthy?
Have at it. For some reason, some folks aren't too happy with pollsters these days...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
You are. Very simple.
I'd do as you said first. Draw out the fluid in the reservoir and pour on new. Then with someone to pump brakes and hold pedal, open the valve fluid will push out. The person helping you should hold the pedal on the floor until you tighten valve back. They should pump the brakes and hold...(repeat). This should be done a few times until you see clean fluid coming out. Just be sure to keep the reservoir filled with fluid so as not to draw air into the lines. Start with Left Front, Right Front, Right Rear, Left Rear in this order.
I found a one man brake bleeding kit on Amazon. It has a check valve so old fluid and air can't go back in. Some videos I've watched say you hook the hose up to the bleeder, open it and then pump the brakes a few times then once the fluid coming out starts to be clean, you close the bleeder and move to the next one. All while keeping the reservoir filled? Am I over complicating this? It seems like there's a lot of differing opinions on the correct way to do this.
 

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I did it a few weeks ago. Siphoned out reservoir, then filled with new fluid. Hooked up 3 feet of clear vinyl tubing to bleed valve, punched a matching hole in an empty Gatorade bottle, ran the tube to the bottom. Had GF start engine and pump brakes til I saw clean fluid in clear tube, then closed bleed valve. Repeated on other wheels. Topped off reservoir.

First time I did it took me 2 hours, this last time took me 45 minutes + time spent removing and recounting wheels.
 

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The only other thing I would say about bleeding brakes is the need for some very very good eye protection. I haven't experienced it, but know someone who got a drop of brake fluid in the eye. It doesn't seem to be a big deal at first, but it turned out to be a 2 week painful ordeal with trips to the eye doc.
 
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I did it a few weeks ago. Siphoned out reservoir, then filled with new fluid. Hooked up 3 feet of clear vinyl tubing to bleed valve, punched a matching hole in an empty Gatorade bottle, ran the tube to the bottom. Had GF start engine and pump brakes til I saw clean fluid in clear tube, then closed bleed valve. Repeated on other wheels. Topped off reservoir.

First time I did it took me 2 hours, this last time took me 45 minutes + time spent removing and recounting wheels.
Sounds great Ken,

IIRC, it will work the same if the engine is not running? As far as bleeding air out.
 
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