Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2006 Honda Pilot Ex 2wd - 213k miles and no records of when plugs were changed but only getting 15 mpg so I was thinking of changing PCV valve and plugs. Rock auto has many choices but was wondering if the Denso plugs are a good option?
One was DENSO 4701 Iridium TT; Pre-Set Gap: 0.040" .
Thanks
 

· Registered
05 EX-L
Joined
·
549 Posts
Denso and NGK are the only plugs you want in our vehicles. Those are good spark plugs. You will have no issues using them. If you are just a regular driver you won't even tell the difference between NGK or Denso.
NGK is beefier, and will last longer under heavier conditions.
Denso will provide you more power if you need performance, but will not necessarily stand up over time of hard use.
It is a trade off. Depends on your needs.
I personally like to go with NGK. It is what came in our vehicles, and will work the best.
This is the spark plug that came with your vehicle. NGK Laser Iridium Spark Plug Izfr5k11
Those Denso will work just fine. You may even find your engine responds better with them, but may not give you the longevity and consistency the NGK Izfr5k11 will provide.

Do not drop them into the spark plug tubes as they may lose gap on impact. Do not use anti-seize on them. Do not gap them. Don't touch the electrode. Make sure you torque them down. Check the gap visually of each plug that they all look similar in gap. After a few thousand miles or whenever you can check on them in a week, month or anytime in the future double check that they didn't back out. Not likely, but I have experienced plugs backing out over time.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Denso and NGK are the only plugs you want in our vehicles. Those are good spark plugs. You will have no issues using them. If you are just a regular driver you won't even tell the difference between NGK or Denso.
NGK is beefier, and will last longer under heavier conditions.
Denso will provide you more power if you need performance, but will not necessarily stand up over time of hard use.
It is a trade off. Depends on your needs.
I personally like to go with NGK. It is what came in our vehicles, and will work the best.
This is the spark plug that came with your vehicle. NGK Laser Iridium Spark Plug Izfr5k11
Those Denso will work just fine. You may even find your engine responds better with them, but may not give you the longevity and consistency the NGK Izfr5k11 will provide.

Do not drop them into the spark plug tubes as they may lose gap on impact. Do not use anti-seize on them. Do not gap them. Don't touch the electrode. Make sure you torque them down. Check the gap visually of each plug that they all look similar in gap. After a few thousand miles or whenever you can check on them in a week, month or anytime in the future double check that they didn't back out. Not likely, but I have experienced plugs backing out over time.
Thanks for the detailed reply. Don't use cars that often perhaps 4k miles a year so probably Denso will be the choice.
Anything else that I should consider doing at same time, like wires etc?
 

· Registered
Bolt - 2006 Honda Odyssey (EX)
Joined
·
330 Posts
Thanks for the detailed reply. Don't use cars that often perhaps 4k miles a year so probably Denso will be the choice.
Anything else that I should consider doing at same time, like wires etc?
At your mileage it may not be a bad idea to replace the O2 sensors, they're probably not at peak efficiency anymore. At the very least the two upstream sensors. Denso or NTK sensors for those.
 

· Registered
05 EX-L
Joined
·
549 Posts
There is a whole list of things I do when I get a new car. Everything I do is Honda or OEM that came from honda with a few exceptions. Regardless of fluid condition I replace them all except for Mobil 1 full synthetic w/1 year 10k oil filter I replace filter once per year, and ATP AT-205 in power steering, engine oil, and transmission. I clean the EGR system (Valve, ports, channels (in Intake manifold), EGR valve gasket, Clean Throttle Body, Throttle body gasket, Engine/cabin/transmission filters, valve lash, valve cover gasket (Fel pro kit), spark plug tube seals, spark plugs, radiator cap, Clean battery terminals, PCV valve, inspect pulleys/serpentine belt/timing belt (replace only if need), power steering o-rings, Inspect hoses (secured, cracked, hard, brittle), inspect grounds (secure, green, split), check exterior/interior lights, restore headlights, inspect rubber parts, grease joints (I like to clean old grease off and use Superlube for everything), inspect brake system, get alignment, operate everything and replace/fix what isn't working, Michelin tires, ATP AT-205 rubber joints, Walmart Michelin endurance XT silicone wiper blades. Walmart Everstart Maxx battery.

Most of the parts come from either the dealer or the junkyard. Depends on the part. If I can find it in the junkyard I get it there first. Once you install it, it's used. Many good parts to be had, but this takes time, and life expectancy is lower, but if you know what you're doing the price is way cheaper. Only Genuine Honda parts when picking parts from Junkyard.
Many of the above items don't need to be replaced, and I don't always do them all, especially if the part is still good, but the cheap stuff I do regardless of the current condition. That way I know what was done to it, and when. I just pulled this off the top of my head. I'm sure I will remember lots more later. I'll post bellow if I get a better list.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There is a whole list of things I do when I get a new car. Everything I do is Honda or OEM that came from honda with a few exceptions. Regardless of fluid condition I replace them all except for Mobil 1 full synthetic w/1 year 10k oil filter I replace filter once per year, and ATP AT-205 in power steering, engine oil, and transmission. I clean the EGR system (Valve, ports, channels (in Intake manifold), EGR valve gasket, Clean Throttle Body, Throttle body gasket, Engine/cabin/transmission filters, valve lash, valve cover gasket (Fel pro kit), spark plug tube seals, spark plugs, radiator cap, Clean battery terminals, PCV valve, inspect pulleys/serpentine belt/timing belt (replace only if need), power steering o-rings, Inspect hoses (secured, cracked, hard, brittle), inspect grounds (secure, green, split), check exterior/interior lights, restore headlights, inspect rubber parts, grease joints (I like to clean old grease off and use Superlube for everything), inspect brake system, get alignment, operate everything and replace/fix what isn't working, Michelin tires, ATP AT-205 rubber joints, Walmart Michelin endurance XT silicone wiper blades. Walmart Everstart Maxx battery.

Most of the parts come from either the dealer or the junkyard. Depends on the part. If I can find it in the junkyard I get it there first. Once you install it, it's used. Many good parts to be had, but this takes time, and life expectancy is lower, but if you know what you're doing the price is way cheaper. Only Genuine Honda parts when picking parts from Junkyard.
Many of the above items don't need to be replaced, and I don't always do them all, especially if the part is still good, but the cheap stuff I do regardless of the current condition. That way I know what was done to it, and when. I just pulled this off the top of my head. I'm sure I will remember lots more later. I'll post bellow if I get a better list.
My list is growing. Thanks for the input.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
13,251 Posts
Denso or NGK (avoid Bosch, etc. again here) and the NGK Laser Iridium (Ruthenium is unavailable for your model year) are the ones you really want for your 2006:

More Information for NGK 3657


Make sure you torque them down. Check the gap visually of each plug that they all look similar in gap. After a few thousand miles or whenever you can check on them in a week, month or anytime in the future double check that they didn't back out. Not likely, but I have experienced plugs backing out over time.
(y) This is a real thing, folks. Make it a maintenance item.

Opinions may be mixed on anti-seize, but heed and recheck the torque specs.

18 N-m (1.8 kqf-rn, 13 lbf.ft).
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
13,251 Posts
Just a reminder to beware fake NGK Laser Iridiums creeping up on some "popular" online sites. Get them from a rock-solid :) reputable source. Pun notwithstanding, no kidding.
 

· Registered
05 EX-L
Joined
·
549 Posts

Denso plugs are installed on almost every automobile model manufactured in Japan. The iridium used in them has a superior hardness. The electrode’s diameter in these plugs shrinks more than an NGK. For this reason, Denso plugs won’t last longer than NGK units but they will be better at producing powerful sparks.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Denso or NGK (avoid Bosch, etc. again here) and the NGK Laser Iridium (Ruthenium is unavailable for your model year) are the ones you really want for your 2006:

More Information for NGK 3657




(y) This is a real thing, folks. Make it a maintenance item.

Opinions may be mixed on anti-seize, but heed and recheck the torque specs.

18 N-m (1.8 kqf-rn, 13 lbf.ft).
What torque wrench would you recommend as i don't trust the HF 3/8 click one that I currently own to torque 13 ft lbs?
 

· Registered
05 EX-L
Joined
·
549 Posts
I don't have a preference, but I use HF torque wrenches. Probably not recommended, but it is what I use. I always back out the tension before storing, and after I am done torqueing a set, and know I won't use if for more then an hour I release tension. If you didn't release the tension on the spring, you should replace it for a new one under warranty. Just go in and swap it out.
I also use the correct one for the job. I use my 1/4" inch pound on spark plugs. I go slow, and don't bounce when I torque down, which can over torque.
I also have been able to feel when it doesn't feel right. When you do it enough, you get a feel for where they like to seat. It isn't a feel for how much torque, but a feel for how the bolts/nuts like to be torqued.
Knowing how to set the torque is important too. I admittedly didn't know how to set the torque properly when I first got mine. I was going up to the number, and not the line of the number, and over torqued a bolt and stripped out the threads.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I don't have a preference, but I use HF torque wrenches. Probably not recommended, but it is what I use. I always back out the tension before storing, and after I am done torqueing a set, and know I won't use if for more then an hour I release tension. If you didn't release the tension on the spring, you should replace it for a new one under warranty. Just go in and swap it out.
I also use the correct one for the job. I use my 1/4" inch pound on spark plugs. I go slow, and don't bounce when I torque down, which can over torque.
I also have been able to feel when it doesn't feel right. When you do it enough, you get a feel for where they like to seat. It isn't a feel for how much torque, but a feel for how the bolts/nuts like to be torqued.
Knowing how to set the torque is important too. I admittedly didn't know how to set the torque properly when I first got mine. I was going up to the number, and not the line of the number, and over torqued a bolt and stripped out the threads.
I have HF 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2 but the other day when I tried torquing the 3/8 Transmission bolt it wasn't clicking and I was afraid that it would not, so i stopped. Do I need a receipt to exchange at HF as i purchased about 7 years ago but have not really used the 3/8. The 1/2 gets most of the work for lug nuts. i always put away with no tension on the wrench.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top