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I would wait for the new re-designed PIlot ... I hear it looks a lot more like the Ridgeline . Honda said online they have heard the cries from the public about how it was mistaken for the odyssey. Or maybe they just stopped here and saw how much we bash on the mini van look :)
 

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I would wait for the new re-designed PIlot ... I hear it looks a lot more like the Ridgeline . Honda said online they have heard the cries from the public about how it was mistaken for the odyssey. Or maybe they just stopped here and saw how much we bash on the mini van look :)
But after the first couple years of the 3rd gen and the VCM/compliance bushings on early 2nd gens I don't think I'd qualify the impending 4th gen as reliable.

OP, I'd look for a '14 or '15... Pull the rear plugs on the VCM cylinders before purchasing, if all looks good disable the VCM right away. Freshen the fluids, do the timing belt (since all of the '15s are hitting 7 years this year being manufactured in '14) and enjoy.
 

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2008 Piot SE FWD, 2015 Pilot LX 4WD. 2005 GSX-R1000
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I would wait for the new re-designed PIlot ... I hear it looks a lot more like the Ridgeline . Honda said online they have heard the cries from the public about how it was mistaken for the odyssey. Or maybe they just stopped here and saw how much we bash on the mini van look :)
Well, I'm not on any Ridge froums, but.....

What? The Pilots mistaken for an Oddy? That's odd LOL A big, low to the ground van?
More like a Ridgeline? It's going to have an open top, uni body bed on it? Or maybe you mean the front end?
The 3rd gen to me does not look like a mini van- I don't own a 3rd gen either though.
The 3rd gen looks like all the other Soccer mom SUV's out there IMHO. YMMV.
 
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But after the first couple years of the 3rd gen and the VCM/compliance bushings on early 2nd gens I don't think I'd qualify the impending 4th gen as reliable.

OP, I'd look for a '14 or '15... Pull the rear plugs on the VCM cylinders before purchasing, if all looks good disable the VCM right away. Freshen the fluids, do the timing belt (since all of the '15s are hitting 7 years this year being manufactured in '14) and enjoy.
Much better off with a used Mercedes Bluetech diesel.








(kidding, very much kidding)
 

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@cintocrunch I just bought a '14...which cylinders are the VCM cylinders? I want to have my mechanic to specifically check those out after I have the vehicle.
I believe checking any of the rear cylinders is sufficient for checking the spark plugs, @Nail Grease is more familiar with which cylinders have the worst buildup.
 

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The VCM disabler to get these days is this one:
 

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2015 Honda Pilot Ex-l 4wd modern steel metallic
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I have a 2015 exl I've not noticed any shudder. If there's already one on it where might it be located?
 

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Still on original struts here. I suppose there will come a day, but as of yet I have no indication it's on the immediate horizon.
 

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Reliable? Anything from the first generation (03-08), most of those are now easily over 200k miles, and some (like my '03) have easily passed the 300k mark. However, you can still find absolute gems with less than 100k or under 150k, and those are likely going to give you one of the most reliable Pilots ever built. I may be slightly biased, but I have friends with both 2nd and 3rd gen Pilots, and the first gen just seems more durable and reliable than either.

However, I think you're going to be in pain if you don't go newer because the modern tech has lots of upside.

My wife and I bought a 2020 leftover CRV Hybrid in March for a steal, at that time the dealers were hurting for business and we can sell it now for about $5k more than we paid. Although I can't comment about reliability it's a damn nice ride, got plenty of nice tech features (it ain't a Mazda or VW but it's more than sufficient) and blows my 03 Pilot out of the water with overall comfort and handling.

I'm also not gonna mince words - but if it's truly 'reliability' you're after, and you're not concerned about MPG - then by all means, go straight to the closest Yota dealer and get a pre-owned 4Runner. Perhaps just my opinion, but I don't think you can find a more reliable/durable vehicle sold in the US. I was going to get a 2018 4Runner but considering my wife and I like putting miles on a car, when I saw the MPG of the Yota I balked and went with the CRV...
 

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Still on original struts here. I suppose there will come a day, but as of yet I have no indication it's on the immediate horizon.
Change them. I didn’t think mine were bad either, but decided to change struts when I changed shocks. Absolutely handles like a new ride after - I learned from my local Honda master tech that the struts in the first and second Gen Pilots often just slowly weaken over time. They seldom leak or outright fail, instead they just slowly deteriorate as they absorb the miles.

Do it and thank me later … hahaha
 

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Over the course of many cars purchased used for their remaining life, I've learned that the rubber suspension components, ball joints, and tie rods & ends typically deserve replacement by 100k. Our Pilots have a rubber top support for the front struts that includes the bearing that supports steering. There are two bushings on each front control arm, the rear ones being the fluid-filled "compliance bushing" that's been a silent recall item. The rears are easier, with shock absorbers instead of struts, but add the upper link bushings to the mix of things to replace.

Much like that nagging ex-girlfriend, you don't fully appreciate the improvement available until you complete the replacement.

The interval recommendation might be easier if we think of doing it as part of your third re-tirement. Or maybe the second set of replacement brake pads. When you are installing the third set of replacement tires, do the struts and bushings, plus the ball joints and tie rods. The car will ride and handle like new, for less than the cost of a couple payments on a 'new' new car.
 
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Much like that nagging ex-girlfriend, you don't fully appreciate the improvement available until you complete the replacement.
Good points but usually the nagging ends when they become the ex then the cycle repeats itself with the replacement at least thats my experience....sort of like worn or tired bits after the third set.
 
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