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Does anyone have any experience or thoughts on the accuracy of the dashboard miles-you-can-drive estimator? I'm wondering if there is a buffer. With the temporary East Coast fuel shortages, I may have to drive around 20 miles farther than the estimator suggests. I'm wondering if that's feasible/practical.

2012 Pilot EX
 

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I've run mine down to zero indicated remaining miles, and loaded over 20 gals in the tank to the pump click. Guessing there -might- be an unaccounted gallon lurking. I haven't tried running it out further though. I suspect it's also sensitive to the sender calibration and the fuel economy you've enjoyed so far on the prior and current trips. I filled up yesterday and saw a remaining miles number of a tad short of 500 miles. Recent-trips mileage was showing about 28 MPG current trip, about 26 from the prior trip. Didn't look at the prior trip-A economy reading, but the calculated number was a bit over 21 for the whole tank.

Oregon doesn't allow us to pump our own in most populated areas, (other state for that is New Jersey) so it's full when the pump nozzle clicks the first time. Driving/fueling it myself in others states, I can stuff almost five additional gallons in there if I fill it really slowly. There's a small crossover vapor vent hose that balances the fill section from the separate top of the tank, and once the actual level reaches the top of the filler pipe you get to wait for vapor to push back to the filler pipe through that tiny hose. Handy on long trips sometimes but otherwise not really worth the extra effort. By 400-plus miles I'm ready to stop anyway.

MEC (Most Economical Cruise) is between 48 and 50 MPH for me, just fast enough to reliably get the gearbox to top gear and converter locked. AC is off, windows closed, maybe the sunroof lifted to improve air circulation inside. It's still freezing overnight here, so AC hasn't been needed much so far this year. Low high-desert/mountains humidity helps me leave the AC off except for mid-summer afternoons here. Gobs of info on stretching your miles, most of it coming down to driving like you have raw eggs in your shoes and no brakes.

Good news -- that pipeline is slowly coming back on line. It will take a while to fill tanks and get gas out to stations again, probably about the same amount of time as it took to run them out.
 
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Does anyone have any experience or thoughts on the accuracy of the dashboard miles-you-can-drive estimator? I'm wondering if there is a buffer. With the temporary East Coast fuel shortages, I may have to drive around 20 miles farther than the estimator suggests. I'm wondering if that's feasible/practical.

2012 Pilot EX
FYI, its not an estimator, its a Guesstimator. Most vehicle manufactures gas tanks hold about 10% more fuel than the specified amount.

The VW Bug used to many, many years ago have a dead on accurately specified gas tank, but they also had a reserve one gallon tank that you had to actually turn a manual switch to access in case you ran out of gas.
 

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FYI, its not an estimator, its a Guesstimator. Most vehicle manufactures gas tanks hold about 10% more fuel than the specified amount.

The VW Bug used to many, many years ago have a dead on accurately specified gas tank, but they also had a reserve one gallon tank that you had to actually turn a manual switch to access in case you ran out of gas.
My second car was a ten-year-old '58 beetle, the winter driver in the NE while my summer car was stored. No fuel gauge, and that kick lever you mention that lets you use the last gallon or so "reserve" in the bottom of the tank. Gotta remember to flip the foot lever back when yo do get fuel, or the next sputter will include pushing. My '58 beetle had semaphore-style turn signals, a heater that didn't, but was a good snow car in the day. Bought with less than 20k on it for fifty dollars. Sold it a couple years later for three times that. Thirty-six raging air-cooled horsepower. Woohoo!
 
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My second car was a ten-year-old '58 beetle, the winter driver in the NE while my summer car was stored. No fuel gauge, and that kick lever you mention that lets you use the last gallon or so "reserve" in the bottom of the tank. Gotta remember to flip the foot lever back when yo do get fuel, or the next sputter will include pushing. My '58 beetle had semaphore-style turn signals, a heater that didn't, but was a good snow car in the day. Bought with less than 20k on it for fifty dollars. Sold it a couple years later for three times that. Thirty-six raging air-cooled horsepower. Woohoo!
Did you have the uptown model like I had, with the little fan in the storage space behind the back seat??? Now that was living high on the hog.
 

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No hog, unfortunately. The only working fan in the car was for engine cooling, driven by a belt through that cute little 6V generator. Made enough to keep the candles lit, not much more. Even with that fan blowing.

That car was about as simple and basic as possible. The only "relay" in the car was the turn signal flasher. Ignition switch, headlight switch, high-beam switch under the left toe, wiper switch. No radio. Most complex part of the car was those semaphores, the little yellowed plastic arms that swing out with little bulbs in them. It was a Euro version, with electrical tape hiding the semaphores as part of the "federalization" required at import. It's the only blue car I've ever owned. sigh...
 

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No hog, unfortunately. The only working fan in the car was for engine cooling, driven by a belt through that cute little 6V generator. Made enough to keep the candles lit, not much more. Even with that fan blowing.

That car was about as simple and basic as possible. The only "relay" in the car was the turn signal flasher. Ignition switch, headlight switch, high-beam switch under the left toe, wiper switch. No radio. Most complex part of the car was those semaphores, the little yellowed plastic arms that swing out with little bulbs in them. It was a Euro version, with electrical tape hiding the semaphores as part of the "federalization" required at import. It's the only blue car I've ever owned. sigh...
I am so sorry to hear that you had the ghetto model. That fan was the best thing about the car. It was like a mini caged table fan about 6" in diameter. It looked basically like a mini version of this without the stand...
148710

....on a pivot arm and was on the drivers side behind the rear seat. It was designed to be a rear window defroster, but you could point it at the rear window or into the vehicle. It had an on off switch ON THE FREAKING FAN. If you wanted to turn on your the rear window defroster you had to stop the car, get out, turn on the fan and then get back in the car.

Mine also was a two dash gage model. The round speedometer/odometer and the square gas gage between the speedometer and the am radio. That was the sum total of the dash other than the ignition switch. For as simple as that car was I loved to drive that thing.
 

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I don't remember that fan even as an option. Sounds more like something an owner or dealer might add? I also don't remember a year when both the dash gauge and the reserve foot lever were offered in the same car. The fuel gauge was first offered in MY1962 type 1 (Beetle) models in all markets. My 1958 version was just a tad more, um, basic. It was the first year with a big back window though. The good news? My non-winter car was a '65 356SC cab. With a whopping 98 mighty German horsepower, almost 3x what the '58 beetle winter car sported.

The "good old days"...
 

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I don't remember that fan even as an option. Sounds more like something an owner or dealer might add? I also don't remember a year when both the dash gauge and the reserve foot lever were offered in the same car. The fuel gauge was first offered in MY1962 type 1 (Beetle) models in all markets. My 1958 version was just a tad more, um, basic. It was the first year with a big back window though. The good news? My non-winter car was a '65 356SC cab. With a whopping 98 mighty German horsepower, almost 3x what the '58 beetle winter car sported.

The "good old days"...
I think it was a 1964 or 1965. It was originally my Grandads Beatle and I suspect it was a 1965. He gave it to my folks in 1967 after he saw his first VW Fastback and had to have one....in orange no less. Looked just like this.
148730


I think the fan was a VW option as I used to have a photo that showed the behind the back seat storage are with the fan. It was not a photo of my VW. A while back a discussion of 60's VW bugs came up and I came across the photo then.

As for the gage and reserve tank, that I know was there. It was a 1200 model. This was what the dash looked like only in black.
148731


I know it had the reserve tank because it came into play a couple of times before the vehicle was passed to me. It also became a joke when I got the car that there would be no "running out of gas" while on a date.

I was heartbroken when the bug got totaled by my dad. Wasn't his fault, he needed it to go to work one day when his car was being serviced and on the way home it was accordioned in an accident by a truck from behind.

I was heart broken. That was the era when VW powered dune buggies were all the rage and I wanted to build one and put the engine in it. Our auto shop teacher built one and agreed to help me do the same. You could get the fiberglass bodies for cheep and it would have made a great auto shop project.
 

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I had the '58, no gauge but reserve lever. Friend had a '64, gauge but no reserve lever. My mother had a '65 and a '66, both with gauges and no reserve levers. The '65 was a US ("export") model for Euro delivery. The '66 had the emergency flashers shown in your red-dash picture, while the '65 did not. Most internet sources agree that the last year for the reserve valve was MY1961, replaced by the gauge in MY1962, and consistent with the cars I was exposed to at the time.

The "reserve" tank had two taps and roll on top that reduced cargo space in front. The single-tap tank was a lot flatter on top, with sufficient room to place an overnight case behind the top of the spare wheel.
 

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I’m trying to remember that far back. Grandad may have bought a 60/61 first before he bought the 65/66. If so then the 60/61 would have been the one he gave the folks. My biggest memory of all of the VW’s was the night Grandma hit a steer that was out in the road. VW vs steer. Steer won. It wasn’t long after that when my Grandad fell and hit his head on the bumper of a vehicle and died. That’s like 55 or 60 years ago.
 
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