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So about a couple months ago I hit a pothole and my lower rear shock mount broke off and I got it welded back on the same day and it stayed on till today I tried looking at some of the post here and haven’t seen anyone post it but does anyone have a part number for that driver side rear steering knuckle/ spindle not really sure of the proper term for it which also a good reason I haven’t been able to find the part any help/ suggestions will be very much appreciated
 

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have you thought about the salvage yard option, the u pick it yard near me is very reasonable on costs, its all your labor to get the part of.

also, if your in the rust belt, bolt securing the knuckle to the lower control is known to seize the metal sleeve that goes thru the rubber bushing. I broke the bolt on mine, had to drill out the bushing from the knuckle.
 

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Thank you and I will try the salvage yard option and see if I can get it from there
I just had the same problem a few weeks ago on my 2005 EX-L with 90,000 miles. The left (driver's side) lower shock mount broke off for no apparent reason. Although the knuckle was quite rusty (I live in NY) the break was quite clean and rust did not appear to be a contributing factor. See photos 1 and 2.

Since this did not look like a very complicated job and I had a lot of tools, I decided to try it myself. Part of my motivation was that the garage mechanic wanted over $1000 to do the job including a $650 new rear knuckle from Honda plus various other parts including the bearing, speed sensor and upper control arm. He said it would take them several hours of labor since everything was so rusted and pressing the old bearing out and the new one in is time consuming.

Getting the old knuckle out was indeed quite a chore; took me the better part of a day and several stubborn bolts that had to be drilled out or cut off. See photo 3 for the disassembled left rear axle.

Rather than pay $650 for a new knuckle I searched and found an "auto recycling center" (aka junkyard) that had the part for $50 plus $30 shipping. Fortunately, it came from a west coast car that did not suffer the ravages of high humidity, snow and salt. Also, much to my surprise and delight, the replacement part came complete with the bearing, hub, rear brake disc and parking brake assembly. It also had the business end of the speed sensor installed with the cable cut to about 10 inches. Since my old speed sensor was frozen in the knuckle, I just cut the cable and soldered the 2 wires from the connector end to the replacement sensor and protected it with shrink tubing and electrical tape. I was able to return the $50 part that I had bought from Amazon just in case. Also returned the $50 new upper control arm since the ball joint on the old one seemed fine and would likely give the proper camber.

Comparing the old knuckle with the new one was quite shocking. See photo 4 with the replacement on the left and the broken one on the right. You can see that the replacement also came with a nearly pristine backing plate. I had cut mine off years ago since it had rusted so much. The yellow arrow points to the broken shock mount. The red arrow points to the cut speed sensor cable. The green arrow shows the rusted out sections of my original knuckle. You can see the close up of the rust damage in photo 5 compared with the great condition of the replacement part in photo 6.
The invoice from the junkyard gave the VIN of the car that it came from so I looked it up and that car had over 250,000 miles on it when it was totaled. (Of course I don't know if that was the original knuckle assembly.)

Installing the "new" part was not difficult and I coated all the bolts with anti-seize just in case I ever needed to remove them again. The only mistake I made was that I forgot to route the hydraulic brake line through the trailing arm Y pieces and so I had to undo 4 bolts to correct that. As long as everything was apart I decided to replace the brake pads and shocks with new ones (in pairs, of course) even though it did not have to be done yet. Thank you AutoZone for the lifetime warranty on those parts.

One small but very helpful tip I found online: The parking brake cable sheath is attached to the parking brake assembly by a spring clip collar that has 6 flexible tabs holding it in place. The service manual says to use a 12mm offset box wrench to squeeze these tabs closed all at the same time in order to remove the cable. I do not have a 12mm offset but my regular one seemed to fit so I spent an hour struggling with it. I wound up cutting off 2 of the 6 tabs and was finally able to squeeze the others enough to pry it out. The tip I found (after the struggle, of course) was to use a small worm drive hose clamp around the spring clip to squeeze it. I tried this method using a 5/16" clamp on the replacement assembly (which had a cut cable) and it worked like a charm. In less than a minute I was able to pry it free.

The job is finally done (photo 7). Took me about 12 hours over a leisurely 3 days working slowly and torqueing everything to spec. Enjoyed doing the job and saving a bunch of $.

By the way, the place I bought the part from is B&R Auto Wrecking in Oregon (855-339-1932). It took about a week to ship cross country and I was very pleased with their service. In fact, I just ordered the right side knuckle from their same vehicle just to have as a spare in the likely event the the other side fails on my car. Since the part I got (including the bearing) was in such great shape, I figured the other side will be equally as good. I have a feeling that this shock mount failure is not an uncommon occurrence
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Ouch! and Nice Job! (y)
 

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I just had the same problem a few weeks ago on my 2005 EX-L with 90,000 miles. The left (driver's side) lower shock mount broke off for no apparent reason. Although the knuckle was quite rusty (I live in NY) the break was quite clean and rust did not appear to be a contributing factor. See photos 1 and 2.

Since this did not look like a very complicated job and I had a lot of tools, I decided to try it myself. Part of my motivation was that the garage mechanic wanted over $1000 to do the job including a $650 new rear knuckle from Honda plus various other parts including the bearing, speed sensor and upper control arm. He said it would take them several hours of labor since everything was so rusted and pressing the old bearing out and the new one in is time consuming.

Getting the old knuckle out was indeed quite a chore; took me the better part of a day and several stubborn bolts that had to be drilled out or cut off. See photo 3 for the disassembled left rear axle.

Rather than pay $650 for a new knuckle I searched and found an "auto recycling center" (aka junkyard) that had the part for $50 plus $30 shipping. Fortunately, it came from a west coast car that did not suffer the ravages of high humidity, snow and salt. Also, much to my surprise and delight, the replacement part came complete with the bearing, hub, rear brake disc and parking brake assembly. It also had the business end of the speed sensor installed with the cable cut to about 10 inches. Since my old speed sensor was frozen in the knuckle, I just cut the cable and soldered the 2 wires from the connector end to the replacement sensor and protected it with shrink tubing and electrical tape. I was able to return the $50 part that I had bought from Amazon just in case. Also returned the $50 new upper control arm since the ball joint on the old one seemed fine and would likely give the proper camber.

Comparing the old knuckle with the new one was quite shocking. See photo 4 with the replacement on the left and the broken one on the right. You can see that the replacement also came with a nearly pristine backing plate. I had cut mine off years ago since it had rusted so much. The yellow arrow points to the broken shock mount. The red arrow points to the cut speed sensor cable. The green arrow shows the rusted out sections of my original knuckle. You can see the close up of the rust damage in photo 5 compared with the great condition of the replacement part in photo 6.
The invoice from the junkyard gave the VIN of the car that it came from so I looked it up and that car had over 250,000 miles on it when it was totaled. (Of course I don't know if that was the original knuckle assembly.)

Installing the "new" part was not difficult and I coated all the bolts with anti-seize just in case I ever needed to remove them again. The only mistake I made was that I forgot to route the hydraulic brake line through the trailing arm Y pieces and so I had to undo 4 bolts to correct that. As long as everything was apart I decided to replace the brake pads and shocks with new ones (in pairs, of course) even though it did not have to be done yet. Thank you AutoZone for the lifetime warranty on those parts.

One small but very helpful tip I found online: The parking brake cable sheath is attached to the parking brake assembly by a spring clip collar that has 6 flexible tabs holding it in place. The service manual says to use a 12mm offset box wrench to squeeze these tabs closed all at the same time in order to remove the cable. I do not have a 12mm offset but my regular one seemed to fit so I spent an hour struggling with it. I wound up cutting off 2 of the 6 tabs and was finally able to squeeze the others enough to pry it out. The tip I found (after the struggle, of course) was to use a small worm drive hose clamp around the spring clip to squeeze it. I tried this method using a 5/16" clamp on the replacement assembly (which had a cut cable) and it worked like a charm. In less than a minute I was able to pry it free.

The job is finally done (photo 7). Took me about 12 hours over a leisurely 3 days working slowly and torqueing everything to spec. Enjoyed doing the job and saving a bunch of $.

By the way, the place I bought the part from is B&R Auto Wrecking in Oregon (855-339-1932). It took about a week to ship cross country and I was very pleased with their service. In fact, I just ordered the right side knuckle from their same vehicle just to have as a spare in the likely event the the other side fails on my car. Since the part I got (including the bearing) was in such great shape, I figured the other side will be equally as good. I have a feeling that this shock mount failure is not an uncommon occurrence View attachment 149167 View attachment 149168 View attachment 149171 View attachment 149172 View attachment 149173 View attachment 149174 View attachment 149175 .
So about a couple months ago I hit a pothole and my lower rear shock mount broke off and I got it welded back on the same day and it stayed on till today I tried looking at some of the post here and haven’t seen anyone post it but does anyone have a part number for that driver side rear steering knuckle/ spindle not really sure of the proper term for it which also a good reason I haven’t been able to find the part any help/ suggestions will be very much appreciated
Just a clarification on the parking brake cable comment in my previous post.
Attached are some photos showing cable attachment mechanism. (This sample has already been cut and removed.
Photo 1 shows the spring fingers that hold the cable sheath on the parking brake assembly. There are 6 of these and all need to be compressed simultaneously to remove the cable.
Photo 2 shows the method recommended in the service manual, a 12mm box wrench (they say to use an offset wrench). I found it very difficult to slide the wrench over the retainer and once it was on, the wrench would slide off as I tried prying the cable out of the mounting plate hole.
Photo 3 show a much easier method. Just open up a small (5/16 here) hose clamp, wrap it around the cable, slide it all the way up to the end of the fingers and tighten. Using a nut driver is easier than a screwdriver. Pry the other end out of the parking brake housing using a long screwdriver. You can adjust the clamp tightness as you pry to get just the right amount of tension to compress the spring fingers and still allow the cable to be removed.
 

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Just a clarification on the parking brake cable comment in my previous post.
Attached are some photos showing cable attachment mechanism. (This sample has already been cut and removed.
Photo 1 shows the spring fingers that hold the cable sheath on the parking brake assembly. There are 6 of these and all need to be compressed simultaneously to remove the cable.
Photo 2 shows the method recommended in the service manual, a 12mm box wrench (they say to use an offset wrench). I found it very difficult to slide the wrench over the retainer and once it was on, the wrench would slide off as I tried prying the cable out of the mounting plate hole.
Photo 3 show a much easier method. Just open up a small (5/16 here) hose clamp, wrap it around the cable, slide it all the way up to the end of the fingers and tighten. Using a nut driver is easier than a screwdriver. Pry the other end out of the parking brake housing using a long screwdriver. You can adjust the clamp tightness as you pry to get just the right amount of tension to compress the spring fingers and still allow the cable to be removed.
Nice tip! Got a box of hose clamps aching to be repurposed. We could use a repurposing thread / tips
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I just had the same problem a few weeks ago on my 2005 EX-L with 90,000 miles. The left (driver's side) lower shock mount broke off for no apparent reason. Although the knuckle was quite rusty (I live in NY) the break was quite clean and rust did not appear to be a contributing factor. See photos 1 and 2.

Since this did not look like a very complicated job and I had a lot of tools, I decided to try it myself. Part of my motivation was that the garage mechanic wanted over $1000 to do the job including a $650 new rear knuckle from Honda plus various other parts including the bearing, speed sensor and upper control arm. He said it would take them several hours of labor since everything was so rusted and pressing the old bearing out and the new one in is time consuming.

Getting the old knuckle out was indeed quite a chore; took me the better part of a day and several stubborn bolts that had to be drilled out or cut off. See photo 3 for the disassembled left rear axle.

Rather than pay $650 for a new knuckle I searched and found an "auto recycling center" (aka junkyard) that had the part for $50 plus $30 shipping. Fortunately, it came from a west coast car that did not suffer the ravages of high humidity, snow and salt. Also, much to my surprise and delight, the replacement part came complete with the bearing, hub, rear brake disc and parking brake assembly. It also had the business end of the speed sensor installed with the cable cut to about 10 inches. Since my old speed sensor was frozen in the knuckle, I just cut the cable and soldered the 2 wires from the connector end to the replacement sensor and protected it with shrink tubing and electrical tape. I was able to return the $50 part that I had bought from Amazon just in case. Also returned the $50 new upper control arm since the ball joint on the old one seemed fine and would likely give the proper camber.

Comparing the old knuckle with the new one was quite shocking. See photo 4 with the replacement on the left and the broken one on the right. You can see that the replacement also came with a nearly pristine backing plate. I had cut mine off years ago since it had rusted so much. The yellow arrow points to the broken shock mount. The red arrow points to the cut speed sensor cable. The green arrow shows the rusted out sections of my original knuckle. You can see the close up of the rust damage in photo 5 compared with the great condition of the replacement part in photo 6.
The invoice from the junkyard gave the VIN of the car that it came from so I looked it up and that car had over 250,000 miles on it when it was totaled. (Of course I don't know if that was the original knuckle assembly.)

Installing the "new" part was not difficult and I coated all the bolts with anti-seize just in case I ever needed to remove them again. The only mistake I made was that I forgot to route the hydraulic brake line through the trailing arm Y pieces and so I had to undo 4 bolts to correct that. As long as everything was apart I decided to replace the brake pads and shocks with new ones (in pairs, of course) even though it did not have to be done yet. Thank you AutoZone for the lifetime warranty on those parts.

One small but very helpful tip I found online: The parking brake cable sheath is attached to the parking brake assembly by a spring clip collar that has 6 flexible tabs holding it in place. The service manual says to use a 12mm offset box wrench to squeeze these tabs closed all at the same time in order to remove the cable. I do not have a 12mm offset but my regular one seemed to fit so I spent an hour struggling with it. I wound up cutting off 2 of the 6 tabs and was finally able to squeeze the others enough to pry it out. The tip I found (after the struggle, of course) was to use a small worm drive hose clamp around the spring clip to squeeze it. I tried this method using a 5/16" clamp on the replacement assembly (which had a cut cable) and it worked like a charm. In less than a minute I was able to pry it free.

The job is finally done (photo 7). Took me about 12 hours over a leisurely 3 days working slowly and torqueing everything to spec. Enjoyed doing the job and saving a bunch of $.

By the way, the place I bought the part from is B&R Auto Wrecking in Oregon (855-339-1932). It took about a week to ship cross country and I was very pleased with their service. In fact, I just ordered the right side knuckle from their same vehicle just to have as a spare in the likely event the the other side fails on my car. Since the part I got (including the bearing) was in such great shape, I figured the other side will be equally as good. I have a feeling that this shock mount failure is not an uncommon occurrence View attachment 149167 View attachment 149168 View attachment 149171 View attachment 149172 View attachment 149173 View attachment 149174 View attachment 149175 .
Great job I ended up welding metal plates around it as reinforcement and hasn’t broke since but mine broke the exact same way yours did
 

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Great job I ended up welding metal plates around it as reinforcement and hasn’t broke since but mine broke the exact same way yours did
I like your solution of welding a reinforcement. The original casting should have been designed with more metal in that area. This definitely falls into the category of a pattern failure (along with the 2005 radiator problem). I considered having the shock mount welded back on but was advised against it because welding cast iron is problematic. Your solution of adding steel plates is better and hopefully it holds. You may want to consider doing some pre-emptive welding reinforcement on the other side. I bought another $50 knuckle for the passenger side from the same junked vehicle since I'm sure I will need it sooner or later.
 
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