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Not a surprising amount of rust for a New Englander Pilot. The rear subframe crossmember appears mostly intact and can use some treatment. Condider some rust preventative treatments to slow /stop the process would be prudent. Do some research on fluidfilm or Por-15 type agents that have been used.
The rear crossmember/mount connection rusts from the inside out. It may help to spray a liberal amount of Fluid Film into that area. It’s not magic, but it’s supposed to soak into the rust and slow down the oxidation of the remaining steel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
The rear crossmember/mount connection rusts from the inside out. It may help to spray a liberal amount of Fluid Film into that area. It’s not magic, but it’s supposed to soak into the rust and slow down the oxidation of the remaining steel.
I can see from the famous "subframe mount repair" thread, you speak from experience :p I wonder what would work best, fluid film, por15, eastwood rust encapsulator inside the crossmember.

projectfarm's youtube channel had a great watch on rust convertors and it looks like POR15 came out on top, unfortunately I cant just spray it into the crossmember...
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I may post this into the general 2003-2008 section, but does anyone have a good source for the aisin timing belt kit? I'm having trouble finding a source online. It looks like most places are OOS and the few that have backorder dates show it restocking around March.
 

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Personally? I’d spray some T9 boeshield on it once a month. For $2500, I’d expect to do some “upkeep”
like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Personally? I’d spray some T9 boeshield on it once a month. For $2500, I’d expect to do some “upkeep”
like that.
Thats a product I wasn't familiar with. Thank you for pointing it out!

Also, I ended up finding the TKH-001 in stock at of all places, walmart.

says sold and shipped by walmart, which is better than it getting drop shipped by a third party at least. Here's to hoping its legit.
 

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I can see from the famous "subframe mount repair" thread, you speak from experience :p I wonder what would work best, fluid film, por15, eastwood rust encapsulator inside the crossmember.

projectfarm's youtube channel had a great watch on rust convertors and it looks like POR15 came out on top, unfortunately I cant just spray it into the crossmember...
My opinion would be to use a product that will creep and saturate the rusted area, like Fluid Film. FF can also be renewed yearly, and it’s not supposed to damage rubber suspension bushings. There are probably other products that work in a similar fashion. You may be able to slow down the corrosion by saturating the area.

The rust converters and cover ups might not be able to get down inside the crossmember where the connection is rusting away. They look better from the outside, but the rust is still continuing underneath.

I just read a bit on the product mentioned above, T9 boeshield. Looks like it could help.
 

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The rust converters and cover ups might not be able to get down inside the crossmember where the connection is rusting away. They look better from the outside, but the rust is still continuing underneath.
Perhaps a cross member “port” could be drilled to allow one of these products to be sprayed or injected into the backside?

just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Perhaps a cross member “port” could be drilled to allow one of these products to be sprayed or injected into the backside?

just a thought.
haha all i could picture was a grease fitting and me emptying a couple of tubes of grease into the cross member to disperse all that water. Probably a terrible idea and would end up trapping pockets of water in there.
 

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I think drilling a hole in an already (possibly) rusty, corroded truss would be a bad idea.
 

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I think drilling a hole in an already (possibly) rusty, corroded truss would be a bad idea.
It’s a way to access the area and spray an anti corrosion treatment. The rear subframe already has a couple of openings where it is welded to the frame side rails. Water and salt and other shi* gets in there and sets up the internal corrosion. Maybe not in Texas, where there are just dead armadillos on the road.

Anyway, a little quarter inch drill hole or two ain’t gonna hurt anything, if it lets the OP spray a bunch of rust fighter into there.

For crying out loud, this is a 2003 from a road salt state. It’s maybe got 3 or 4 years left, at best. What the heck are you afraid of?
 

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haha all i could picture was a grease fitting and me emptying a couple of tubes of grease into the cross member to disperse all that water. Probably a terrible idea and would end up trapping pockets of water in there.
Don’t use grease. Fluid Film or the T9 Boeing stuff.
 

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It’s a way to access the area and spray an anti corrosion treatment. The rear subframe already has a couple of openings where it is welded to the frame side rails. Water and salt and other shi* gets in there and sets up the internal corrosion. Maybe not in Texas, where there are just dead armadillos on the road.

Anyway, a little quarter inch drill hole or two ain’t gonna hurt anything, if it lets the OP spray a bunch of rust fighter into there.

For crying out loud, this is a 2003 from a road salt state. It’s maybe got 3 or 4 years left, at best. What the heck are you afraid of?
huh. Your response seemed a little aggro but whatever.

I grew up learning that drilling hole(s) into an already compromised load bearing strut is a bad idea. I ain’t afraid of s... seeing how I have zero skin in someone else’s 2003 Pilot game- but I think it was worth mentioning.
 

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huh. Your response seemed a little aggro but whatever.

I grew up learning that drilling hole(s) into an already compromised load bearing strut is a bad idea. I ain’t afraid of shit- seeing how I have zero skin in someone else’s 2003 Pilot game- but I think it was worth mentioning.
Taking a neutral stance: it depends on the size of the proposed hole and also how corroded things really are. Swiss cheesing a rusty beam is never good but an access hole or two sized appropriately that allows one to spray rust treatment in and treat the new hole may be proper. Could use a plastic plug...ymmv as we fight and hate rust that never sleeps ;)
 

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I'm all for POR-15 on surfaces that can be reached, but loose flakes need to be removed and a quick degreasing needs to happen. Use it on my '61 Impala whenever I have something apart and it is great stuff.

For those cavities, fluid film or some other dedicated cavity spray is definitely needed.

I thought in the super rusty states and north of the wall the "fluid film" type of product installers will actually drill holes in the areas like door frames and other obscured areas so they could spray in that area. They seal it off with a rubber plug that is easily removable for the next treatment.

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Synthetic rubber Alloy wheel
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I appreciate everyone’s thoughts. The treatment of the crossmember internals just never crossed my mind and will definitely be added into my agenda. I agree this is a near 20 yr old car and i don’t have much to lose in it, but im going to give it the best life i can before i finish driving it into the ground lol.

Thanks everyone and my next major update will be undertaking the timing belt. Hopefully walmart comes through and actually ships it. It went out of stock on their site hours after i posted the link and no idea if they’ll actually process my order.

ordered the honda crankshalf adapter AND that beastly 19mm socket. Hoping my cordless midtorque has enough balls and if not ill be eyeballing the high torque version and justifying it since its DIY ill still be saving money…haha
 

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huh. Your response seemed a little aggro but whatever.

I grew up learning that drilling hole(s) into an already compromised load bearing strut is a bad idea. I ain’t afraid of s... seeing how I have zero skin in someone else’s 2003 Pilot game- but I think it was worth mentioning.
Sorry for the aggro. I guess that my point is when that internal coupling pulls out of the rusted subframe, it makes a lot bigger hole than 1/4 inch. OP’s subframe is clearly rusting, and it happens from inside out. There might be enough steel in there to hang on if he soaks it with the right stuff. A couple of access holes are not going to be the cause of failure.
 

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come spring time I will lift it up and take out as much rust before I POR15 it.
First thought that was L33t 5p34k for "PORIS'" whatever that would be, :D

But it's POR-15: Professional High Performance Vehicle Restoration Products


I'm partial to Fluid Film myself.

 

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I have a 2003 from the Midwest rust belt and, compared with mine, yours looks pristine. However, I know how much salt they use in Massachusetts (went to grad school at UCONN), so the suspension and engine bay still saw tons of salt spray. I see alot of concern over the timing belt and rear subframe mounts, but having owned my '03 for almost 4 years, those would not be my first 'chores'. Here is where I would start:

1) Go buy a 2-pack of WD-40, ~12 cans of brake parts cleaner from Walmart and 2 cans of Fluid Film (as recommended above). You may need more but that's a good start. I'm not joking.

2) Spray the WD-40 liberally on the fill and drain bolt on the rear end. Do this daily for an entire week. Go to the dealer and buy 1 gallon of VTM-4 fluid. Go to Harbor Freight and get the pump fill. Crack the fill bolt first, and when you can finally get that loose, then remove the drain bolt and change the fluid. After almost 20 years you definitely want new VTM-4 fluid in a car that will use AWD, and the spare (that's hanging right there) is also probably toast (try to get a full-size spare at a boneyard for cheap).

3) 20 years of winter driving suggests the metal tranny lines, brake lines and fuel line connections (by the fuel tank) are likely just a smidge away from failure. I just needed to change the two fuel lines on mine a few weeks ago, that job seriously sucks azz.

4) The low pressure power steering return also uses a tube that runs along the frame - this also rots where the bolt brackets get tack welded to the tube - check that closely. If the power steering whines, the pump probably needs new o-rings.

5) Be prepared to rip the intake plenum off and remove the EGR valve; spray everything liberally with intake cleaner and some with brake cleaner. The passages on the plenum are likely well carbonized and will need soaking. You will likely use 2-3 cleans of brake parts cleaner if this has never been done, maybe more (I think I used 4-5), because some of the carbon will likely be hardened deposits. Get a $6 PCV valve from NAPA (or O'Reilly, etc.) and change it.

6) Your brakes may be OK now, but based on the amount of salt spray I see in your engine compartment, I suspect the calipers will need to be replaced soon. Salt eventually makes its way into the slide pins and they corrode and seize. You'll know they're bad because the shudder on this car is horrible when the calipers stick.

7) Change the air cabin filter. You won't regret it.

8) Now I'd focus on the TB. Change the radiator (this is cheap, ~$100) at the same time and if you wanted to do it all at once, you could also take the time to clean all the intake passages, change the valve cover gaskets and check the valves as one big job. Even though the miles are low, I suspect it's been started a gazillion times and therefore the exhaust valves are likely a little tight and could use some adjusting.
 

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I have a 2003 from the Midwest rust belt and, compared with mine, yours looks pristine. However, I know how much salt they use in Massachusetts (went to grad school at UCONN), so the suspension and engine bay still saw tons of salt spray. I see alot of concern over the timing belt and rear subframe mounts, but having owned my '03 for almost 4 years, those would not be my first 'chores'. Here is where I would start:

1) Go buy a 2-pack of WD-40, ~12 cans of brake parts cleaner from Walmart and 2 cans of Fluid Film (as recommended above). You may need more but that's a good start. I'm not joking.

2) Spray the WD-40 liberally on the fill and drain bolt on the rear end. Do this daily for an entire week. Go to the dealer and buy 1 gallon of VTM-4 fluid. Go to Harbor Freight and get the pump fill. Crack the fill bolt first, and when you can finally get that loose, then remove the drain bolt and change the fluid. After almost 20 years you definitely want new VTM-4 fluid in a car that will use AWD, and the spare (that's hanging right there) is also probably toast (try to get a full-size spare at a boneyard for cheap).

3) 20 years of winter driving suggests the metal tranny lines, brake lines and fuel line connections (by the fuel tank) are likely just a smidge away from failure. I just needed to change the two fuel lines on mine a few weeks ago, that job seriously sucks azz.

4) The low pressure power steering return also uses a tube that runs along the frame - this also rots where the bolt brackets get tack welded to the tube - check that closely. If the power steering whines, the pump probably needs new o-rings.

5) Be prepared to rip the intake plenum off and remove the EGR valve; spray everything liberally with intake cleaner and some with brake cleaner. The passages on the plenum are likely well carbonized and will need soaking. You will likely use 2-3 cleans of brake parts cleaner if this has never been done, maybe more (I think I used 4-5), because some of the carbon will likely be hardened deposits. Get a $6 PCV valve from NAPA (or O'Reilly, etc.) and change it.

6) Your brakes may be OK now, but based on the amount of salt spray I see in your engine compartment, I suspect the calipers will need to be replaced soon. Salt eventually makes its way into the slide pins and they corrode and seize. You'll know they're bad because the shudder on this car is horrible when the calipers stick.

7) Change the air cabin filter. You won't regret it.

8) Now I'd focus on the TB. Change the radiator (this is cheap, ~$100) at the same time and if you wanted to do it all at once, you could also take the time to clean all the intake passages, change the valve cover gaskets and check the valves as one big job. Even though the miles are low, I suspect it's been started a gazillion times and therefore the exhaust valves are likely a little tight and could use some adjusting.
this here is why I joined this forum. Good info to have. Thanks for all of this!
 
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